Of Interest

  • WhatsApp to Share User Data With Facebook

    Date published: 
    August 25, 2016

    "Thursday’s changes likely can’t be applied to data users have already shared with WhatsApp, said Ryan Calo, a professor of law at the University of Washington. “You can’t make a change like this retroactively under the FTC’s view of deception,” he said."

  • Apple vulnerability is surprising, but journalists should stick with iPhones

    Author(s): 
    Geoffrey King
    Publication Date: 
    August 25, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    A rare and serious vulnerability in Apple's iOS operating system has been discovered by researchers at the University of Toronto's Citizen Lab, which today published a report detailing its findings. It is the first known remote iOS vulnerability of its kind. Disturbingly, the company behind malware designed to exploit the security flaw may have also helped target an investigative journalist in Mexico in 2015, Citizen Lab said.

  • Uber to introduce self-driving cars to its fleet in coming weeks

    Date published: 
    August 18, 2016

    "Uber's move to carry people with autonomous vehicles is not surprising, given the company's history of pushing into gray areas where there is little or no regulation, said Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina professor who studies self-driving technology.

    Pennsylvania, he said, has no laws governing autonomous cars and how they relate to ride-hailing, but local laws may require a driver behind the wheel. By using human backup drivers, Uber basically is going to test the technology and take people along for the ride, he said.

  • T-Mobile's New 'Unlimited' Data Plan Throttles Video, Slows Hotspots

    Date published: 
    August 18, 2016

    "Net neutrality advocates criticized the feature on a number of fronts, including that the company's technical requirements excluded some video distributors at launch. In January, Stanford professor Barbara van Schewick said in a report that Binge On undermined net neutrality by giving people incentives to watch videos from a select group of companies. "A core principle of net neutrality is that ISPs should not pick winners and losers online by favoring some applications over others," she writes. "But that’s exactly what Binge On does," she wrote."

  • Uber to launch fleet of self-driving Volvos. Will Pittsburgh residents hop in?

    Date published: 
    August 18, 2016

    "“Uber is doing the same thing many companies have been doing,” Bryant Walker Smith, an engineering professor at the University of South Carolina, told the NewsHour. But the big news is Uber inviting the general public into its self-driving cars, he said.

    Walker Smith said that consumers should expect to see more changes in transportation in the next couple of years.

  • Uber To Roll Out Self-Driving Cars In Pittsburgh

    Date published: 
    August 18, 2016

    ""Pittsburgh is going to have some self-driving car tourism. That's exciting for them," says Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina who monitors law and policy developments in autonomous technology.

    An Uber staff member (an engineer or specially trained driver) will be inside, as the human co-pilot. So, to be clear, it's not a car without a human. "If we were putting this in terms of a tightrope walk, there would definitely be a net," Smith says.

  • Uber's big test in the steel city

    Date published: 
    August 18, 2016

    "By using human backup drivers, Uber is basically testing the technology and taking people along for the ride, said Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina professor who studies self-driving technology.

    "Part of this is marketing in the sense that they're going to be doing continued research and development of these systems," he said."

     

  • When the Cops Come A-Knocking: Handling Technical Assistance Demands from Law Enforcement

    What kind of surveillance assistance can the U.S. government force companies to provide? This issue has entered the public consciousness due to the FBI's demand in February that Apple write software to help it access the San Bernardino shooter's encrypted iPhone. Technical assistance orders can go beyond the usual government requests for user data, requiring a company to actively participate in the government's monitoring of the targeted user(s).

  • When the Cops Come A-Knocking: Handling Technical Assistance Demands from Law Enforcement (Past Event)

    August 4, 2016
    BlackHat 2016

    What kind of surveillance assistance can the U.S. government force companies to provide? This issue has entered the public consciousness due to the FBI's demand in February that Apple write software to help it access the San Bernardino shooter's encrypted iPhone. Technical assistance orders can go beyond the usual government requests for user data, requiring a company to actively participate in the government's monitoring of the targeted user(s).

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