Of Interest

  • Encryption vs. the FBI

    Encryption vs. the FBI

    What's the latest in the FBI's ongoing dispute with Apple over encrypted iPhones? What's at stake and what could happen next? Guest Speaker, Riana Pfefferkorn is the Cryptography Fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

  • Driverless cars could save lives, kill businesses

    Date published: 
    April 26, 2016

    ""A greater share of crashes could be attributed to a product defect," Bryant Walker Smith, assistant law professor at the University of South Carolina, said at the Michigan conference. In other words, when cars drive themselves, manufacturers - as opposed to human drivers - would be liable."

  • The Burr-Feinstein Crypto Bill Would Gut Our Cybersecurity

    Author(s): 
    Riana Pfefferkorn
    Publication Date: 
    April 26, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    In the name of saving cybersecurity, a new bill before Congress would kill cybersecurity. On April 13, Senators Richard Burr (R-NC) and Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) released an official draft of their long-awaited anti-encryption bill. The sponsors of the “Compliance with Court Orders Act of 2016” (CCOA) call it an innocuous law-and-order measure to ensure that American companies comply with court orders. In truth, it is a technologically tone-deaf and downright dangerous piece of legislation.

  • When a Robot Kills, Is It Murder or Product Liability?

    Author(s): 
    Ryan Calo
    Publication Date: 
    April 26, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    I am a law professor who writes about robotics. I’m also a big Paolo Bacigalupi fan, particularly his breakout novel The Windup Girl involving an artificial girl. So for me, “Mika Model” was not entirely new territory. For all my familiarity with its themes, however, Bacigalupi’s story revealed an important connection in robotics law that had never before occurred to me.

  • Watch live: Encryption vs. the FBI

    Date published: 
    April 26, 2016

    Please join us this Wednesday, Apr. 27 from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. PDT for a discussion on encryption.

    What's the latest on encryption? Stanford University's Riana Pfefferkorn will share what's at stake, what could happen next, and what you should know about the FBI's ongoing dispute with Apple over encrypted iPhones. 

  • Revenge porn: the industry profiting from online abuse

    Date published: 
    April 27, 2016

    "For the vast majority of online harassers, however, the benefit is not monetary but psychological, says Danielle Citron, professor at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law and author of Hate Crimes in Cyberspace.

    “You think of a site like 4chan, where people actually proclaim themselves trolls,” she says. “They derive pleasure from other people’s pain. They’re doing it for the lulz.”"

  • Europe’s Web Privacy Rules: Bad for Google, Bad for Everyone

    Author(s): 
    Daphne Keller
    Publication Date: 
    April 25, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    In a concession to regulators, Google is . . . using “geo-blocking” technology to control what European users can see. Under the new system, Google will not only remove links on, say, google.fr, but it will block users in France from seeing those links on any other Google country site, or google.com itself. Unless they use tools like virtual private networks to disguise their locations, users in those countries will see pruned search results.

  • Can't find Prince on Spotify? Here's how to listen

    Date published: 
    April 25, 2016

    ""And there's no way this would be some kind of market substitute for the original Prince song", Electronic Frontier Foundation lawyer Daniel Nazer said. The channel did something similar after Michael Jackson died in 2009 and after Whitney Houston died in 2012."

  • Second Bid by Feds to Make Apple Unlock iPhone Ends in a Whimper

    Date published: 
    April 24, 2016

    "Like the California case, the New York fight is ending "not with a bang, but with a whimper," said Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

    "The government has repeatedly insisted that Apple's help is utterly necessary in multiple matters involving access to locked iPhones," Pfefferkorn said. "Going forward, courts should refuse to keep rubber-stamping government efforts to dragoon third parties into doing law enforcement's job for it.""

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