Of Interest

  • iSchools 2019 Dissertation Award results announced: Dr. Maia Jacobs is winner, Dr. Jennifer King runner-up

    Date published: 
    January 18, 2019

    The iSchools are pleased to announce that Dr. Maia Jacobs of the Georgia Tech iSchool has been named winner of the 2019 iSchools Doctoral Dissertation Award. The runner up is Dr. Jennifer King of the UC Berkeley iSchool. The iSchools organization congratulates both honorees on their achievement. The pair will be recognized at the upcoming iConference 2019 in Washington DC.

  • Objections to Magistrate Judge's Report and Recommendation

    Author(s): 
    Jennifer Granick
    Riana Pfefferkorn
    Publication Date: 
    January 16, 2019
    Publication Type: 
    Litigation Brief

    Objections to Magistrate Judge's Report and Recommendation to deny the Petition, plus supporting documents (supporting declaration of Jennifer Granick, administrative motion, proposed orders).

  • The Bold Robocar Roaming Las Vegas Without a Human Backup

    Date published: 
    January 16, 2019

    "“Traditional wisdom was companies like Google, Waymo, or Toyota, or GM, or even Uber are going to be really responsible, because if something bad happens it will affect their entire business,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law who studies automated vehicle policy. “I would like to see a little more sharing by all companies about their approach, other than just the superficial ‘trust us.’”"

  • The problem with Brexit is that there’s no obvious next step

    Author(s): 
    Henry Farrell
    Publication Date: 
    January 16, 2019
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    No one was surprised that British Prime Minister Theresa May’s proposed Brexit deal was rejected Tuesday by the House of Commons. What was surprising was that the vote was 432 to 202. Normally, such a humiliating defeat would lead to the resignation of the prime minister. That is highly unlikely to happen: May will continue as prime minister, while Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s motion of no confidence is unlikely to succeed. However, it’s hard to see an alternative deal that would pass muster with both the House of Commons and the European Union.

  • Fake Porn Videos Are Terrorizing Women. Do We Need a Law to Stop Them?

    Date published: 
    January 15, 2019

    "This raises the question of whether Congress could draft a law narrow enough to help victims of deepfakes without such unintended consequences. As a cautionary tale, Annemarie Bridy, a law professor at the University of Idaho, points to the misuse of the copyright takedown system in which companies and individuals have acted in bad faith to remove legitimate criticism and other legal content.

    Still, given what’s at stake with pornographic deep fake videos, Bridy says, it could be worth drafting a new law.

  • When can police compel you to give up your cell phone password?

    Date published: 
    January 11, 2019

    "“That’s at odds with the way that the case law has been developing in other courts,” said Riana Pfefferkorn, associate director of surveillance and cybersecurity at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

    For a firm answer on whether Florida law enforcement can require someone to provide their passcode, Stanford’s Pfefferkorn said, the state’s Supreme Court will need to weigh in.

    “The takeaway is that this guy is unlucky enough to be in a court that is kind of at odds with the other courts that have considered” this issue, she said."

  • What Homeland Security Can Learn from Casinos

    Author(s): 
    Brian Nussbaum
    Publication Date: 
    January 11, 2019
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    At first glance, the problems of homeland security and cybersecurity may seem an odd fit for the Center for Gaming Research and the Special Collections and Archives at UNLV’s Lied Library, but in some important ways it actually fits quite well.

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