Publications

Setting the Record Straight: Carriers Can Help Veterans and Comply with California’s Net Neutrality Law

Author(s): 
Barbara van Schewick
Publication Date: 
March 25, 2021
Publication Type: 
Other Writing
On Wednesday, Politico reported on a leaked email from the Department of Veterans Affairs, expressing concern that California’s net neutrality law could force some wireless providers to end a program that exempted the V.A.’s telehealth app from their customers’ data caps.
 
Veterans across the country and in California shouldn’t have to worry they’ll go over their data caps by talking to their doctor or mental health provider online. In fact, no American or Californian should.
 
But California’s net neutrality law is not the problem here.

Banning Trump from Twitter and Facebook isn’t nearly enough

Author(s): 
Ryan Calo
Woodrow Hartzog
Publication Date: 
January 15, 2021
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Social media finally pulled the plug on Donald Trump. Days after Trump incited a riot at the U.S. Capitol, Twitter permanently banned the president from its platform, and many other social media companies like Facebook, YouTube and Snapchat suspended Trump’s accounts as well.

Read full article Read more about Banning Trump from Twitter and Facebook isn’t nearly enough

The FTC Zoom Case: Does the FTC Need a New Approach?

Author(s): 
Woodrow Hartzog
Publication Date: 
November 10, 2020
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

It was inevitable. On Monday, Zoom joined an exclusive club of tech companies – Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Microsoft, Google, Uber, Snap, and more. This club involves companies that have been under a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) consent decree. In a weird sense, for tech companies, being enforced against by the FTC for a privacy or security violation has become an initiation ritual to being recognized in the pantheon of the tech company big leagues. Read more about The FTC Zoom Case: Does the FTC Need a New Approach?

A Duty of Loyalty for Privacy Law

Author(s): 
Woodrow Hartzog
Publication Date: 
October 29, 2020
Publication Type: 
Academic Writing

It wasn’t supposed to be like this. When the Internet emerged in the mid-1990s, it was heralded as an unprecedented technology of human empowerment; a place where human beings could meet, learn, and express themselves, transforming our society for the better. It was also hailed as a realm of privacy, in which those empowered humans could read, connect and communicate on their own terms, safely cocooned in bubbles of anonymity where, as the famous New Yorker cartoon put it, ‘no one knows you are a dog.’  Read more about A Duty of Loyalty for Privacy Law

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