Press

CIS in the news.

  • Is Police Use of Force About to Get Worse—With Robots?

    Date published: 
    September 22, 2016

    "Ryan Calo, a professor at the University of Washington who’s a leading expert on the intersection of robots and law, said making law enforcement agencies draft policies about how and when they can use robots and drones forces them to think through scenarios in advance. “If you want to put a Taser on a drone and tase a mentally ill person,” Calo said, “or if you want to follow someone around with a drone, that’s where you need to have a process in place that you’ve properly vetted with the leadership.”"

     

  • Germany to create world’s first highway code for driverless cars

    Date published: 
    September 21, 2016

    "Driverless cars may end up being a form of public transport rather than vehicles you own, says Ryan Calo at Stanford University, California. That is happening in the UK and Singapore, where government-provided driverless “pods” are being launched.

    That would go down poorly in the US, however. “The idea that the government would take over driverless cars and treat them as a public good would get absolutely nowhere here,” says Calo."

  • Influencers: Calling it 'critical infrastructure' won't protect the vote

    Date published: 
    September 21, 2016

    ""Local election boards also need access to top tier security experts to assist them in their selection and implementation of voting systems," says Andrea Matwyshyn, a law professor at Northeastern University. "Justice Department oversight and enforcement is urgently needed to ensure that suboptimally conscientious jurisdictions are forced to remediate vulnerable voting systems expeditiously.""

  • Why Unions Should be Concerned about Driverless Cars

    Date published: 
    September 21, 2016

    "“Automation is something anybody who works in or gets income from the transportation sector should be aware of and should be thinking about,” Stanford Law School Scholar Bryant Walker Smith told InsideSources. “There will be profound changes. There will be some opportunities but a lot of challenges for those employed.”

  • Drone Security Guard Scolds Intruders from the Sky

    Date published: 
    September 20, 2016

    "Ryan Calo, an assistant professor at the University of Washington who specializes in law and robotics, says that although the idea of drones confronting humans is unusual, he doesn’t foresee significant objections to the idea. “The beauty of this is that it would be in an environment where people shouldn’t be going,” he says."

  • Regulators release guidance for driverless technology

    Date published: 
    September 20, 2016

    "“Traditional regulations are going to take too long,” said Bryant Walker Smith, an expert on self-driving cars at the University of South Carolina. He says the DOT seems to be learning from past missteps.

    He says, for example, by the time regulators on the aviation side of things finished a lengthy rule-making process on drones, “those rules were already out of date.”"

  • California's proposed DMV rules for driverless cars could change in the wake of federal guidelines

    Date published: 
    September 20, 2016

    "“California is an example of the difficulties of regulating and how an effort to encourage and facilitate automated driving has actually complicated and in some ways impeded it,” said Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor of law and engineering at the University of South Carolina and an affiliate scholar at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School.

  • Feds preview rules of the road for self-driving cars

    Date published: 
    September 20, 2016

    "One self-driving technology expert said the overall tenor of the guidance signaled that the federal government truly has embraced autonomous driving. “In terms of just attitude, this is huge,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who closely tracks the technology. He also cautioned that many details remain unclear."

  • Is there such a thing as “rape culture” on campuses in Canada?

    Date published: 
    September 19, 2016

    "Who are the key players and actors on the issue of sexual violence on university campuses across Canada and internationally?

    Shaheen Shariff, Associate Professor with the Faculty of Education, Director of Define the Line Projects at McGill University has been awarded a $2.5 million Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Partnership Grant to address sexual violence on university campuses across Canada and internationally.

  • Emergency mobile alert on New York explosion suspect sent after incident

    Date published: 
    September 19, 2016

    "Elizabeth Joh, a law professor at the University of California, Davis, said that while desperate times call for desperate measures, it’s important to weigh those measures carefully. “The gravity of the situation is obvious,” she told the Guardian. “But that everyone with a camera and immediate access to social media should be enlisted by means of the cellphone [WEA] is a different question. It’s a difficult balance to strike.”"

  • Will tracking digital harassment help defend against internet trolls?

    Date published: 
    September 19, 2016

    "The Justice Department prosecuted just 10 cyberstalking cases between 2009 and 2012, according to Danielle Citron, a professor of law at the University of Maryland who studies online harassment. In 2015 and 2016, Clark introduced language in reports attached to Department of Justice appropriations bills that urged it to prioritize these crimes. She hopes that having data on prosecutions will show whether Justice Department officials heeded those instructions.

  • Feds Preview Rules of the Road for Self-Driving Cars

    Date published: 
    September 19, 2016

    "One self-driving technology expert said the overall tenor of the guidance signaled that the federal government truly has embraced autonomous driving. "In terms of just attitude, this is huge," said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who closely tracks the technology. He also cautioned that many details remain unclear."

  • U.S. to release guidelines on driverless vehicles

    Date published: 
    September 19, 2016

    "Driverless-car advocates are lauding what they see as regulatory flexibility, noting that the guidelines seemed to be more of a loosely defined framework as opposed to a list of hard-and-fast rules.

    “These aren’t regulations in the formal sense,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a lawyer and assistant professor at the University of South Carolina. “They are not announcing this as a set policy.”"

  • Lyft sees robot taxis approaching fast

    Date published: 
    September 19, 2016

    "Transportation expert Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of North Carolina who’s associated with Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society, said Zimmer’s timeline for autonomous vehicles aligns with his own and those of many others.

  • Federal officials plan aggressive approach to driverless cars

    Date published: 
    September 19, 2016

    "“Some companies will conclude that existing law is perfectly flexible and accommodating for whatever they want to do,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who heads the Emerging Technology Law Committee of the Transportation Research Board. “Some companies may be more conservative and want [legal] structures upfront.”

    But just when those companies will want regulations in place also is open to debate.

  • Self-Driving Cars Gain Powerful Ally: The Government

    Date published: 
    September 19, 2016

    "Over all, the government’s endorsement will speed up the rollout of autonomous cars, experts said, potentially within the next five years.

    “It helps companies by providing some cover. If a car crashes, courts may look to these guidelines to help us determine what was reasonable and not,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina."

  • The Feds Just Got Real About Self-Driving Cars (It’s About Time)

    Date published: 
    September 19, 2016

    "The key is that NHTSA doesn’t specify, or even care, how automakers check those boxes, as long as they do. “This marks an attitudinal change,” says Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law who studies self-driving vehicles. Rather than mandating an approach (like using sans serif font for the vehicle identification number and the exact kinematic viscosities of brake fluid), the agency will be openminded.

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