Press

CIS in the news.

  • The Bold Robocar Roaming Las Vegas Without a Human Backup

    Date published: 
    January 16, 2019

    "“Traditional wisdom was companies like Google, Waymo, or Toyota, or GM, or even Uber are going to be really responsible, because if something bad happens it will affect their entire business,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law who studies automated vehicle policy. “I would like to see a little more sharing by all companies about their approach, other than just the superficial ‘trust us.’”"

  • Fake Porn Videos Are Terrorizing Women. Do We Need a Law to Stop Them?

    Date published: 
    January 15, 2019

    "This raises the question of whether Congress could draft a law narrow enough to help victims of deepfakes without such unintended consequences. As a cautionary tale, Annemarie Bridy, a law professor at the University of Idaho, points to the misuse of the copyright takedown system in which companies and individuals have acted in bad faith to remove legitimate criticism and other legal content.

    Still, given what’s at stake with pornographic deep fake videos, Bridy says, it could be worth drafting a new law.

  • Pedestrians and e-scooters are clashing in the struggle for sidewalk space

    Date published: 
    January 11, 2019

    "In some situations, multibillion-dollar scooter companies may be held liable, but in others, reckless scooter riders, local governments or their insurers could be forced to compensate injured pedestrians, according to Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who is teaching a technology law class next semester exploring ­e-scooter regulation.

  • When can police compel you to give up your cell phone password?

    Date published: 
    January 11, 2019

    "“That’s at odds with the way that the case law has been developing in other courts,” said Riana Pfefferkorn, associate director of surveillance and cybersecurity at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

    For a firm answer on whether Florida law enforcement can require someone to provide their passcode, Stanford’s Pfefferkorn said, the state’s Supreme Court will need to weigh in.

    “The takeaway is that this guy is unlucky enough to be in a court that is kind of at odds with the other courts that have considered” this issue, she said."

  • A Man Sent 1,000 Men Expecting Sex And Drugs To His Ex-Boyfriend Using Grindr, A Lawsuit Say

    Date published: 
    January 10, 2019

    "Some cyberlaw experts fear a ruling against Grindr will put the creativity of the internet as we know it at risk. They say that requiring platforms to more closely monitor users would give an advantage to tech giants like Facebook, Twitter, and Google while hindering smaller startups with niche audiences, including Grindr. It would be more expensive to start new businesses online because of the cost of hiring watchdogs, said Jennifer Granick, surveillance and cybersecurity counsel at the American Civil Liberties Union.

  • Anatomy of an Electric Scooter Crash

    Date published: 
    January 10, 2019

    "“I share the frustration that a new technology—which, if widely deployed and given the same amount of infrastructure support that cars have, could ultimately be much safer—is being negatively compared to an existing transportation technology that is dramatically more dangerous in frequency and severity than scooters,” said Bryant Walker Smith, co-director of University of Michigan’s Project in Law and Mobility."

  • How Microsoft has (so far) avoided tough scrutiny over privacy issues

    Date published: 
    January 10, 2019

    "“They’ve been around the block, they’ve been the evil perpetrator before, and they’ve already learned how to play very nicely with regulators,” Jennifer King, director of consumer privacy at the Center for Internet and Society Stanford Law School, tells Fast Company. “That’s one of the reasons you don’t see Microsoft executives being hauled in to Congress: They have a long-standing relationship, through lobbyists, policymakers–they’ve been in this space for decades.”"

  • Palmer Luckey's second act: Oculus founder gets serious about national security

    Date published: 
    January 9, 2019

    "But Peter Asaro, a professor at The New School who studies technology ethics and is a spokesman for the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, said there are still questions about the accuracy of Anduril's products.

    "What are the error rates for misidentifying things?" Asaro told CNN Business. "You don't really know unless you can test the system.""

  • What Autonomous Cars Can Teach Us About Driving - The Big Picture

    Date published: 
    January 7, 2019

    "Patrick Lin is director of the Ethics + Emerging Sciences Group at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and he constructs grisly thought experiments like the one above to highlight the fundamental issue facing the deployment of autonomous vehicles on our roads. Autonomous vehicles have the potential to dramatically reduce the incidences of death and injury on our roads, ease congestion, and reduce emissions. The problem is not the capability of autonomous vehicle technology. It's deciding how that capability should be used.

  • GDPR Will Pick Up Momentum In 2019

    Date published: 
    January 2, 2019

    "“For a reform of this scope and magnitude, it’s only expected that several months will pass before enforcement comes into focus,” said Omer Tene, VP and chief knowledge officer at the International Association of Privacy Professionals. “2018 wasn’t even a full year for GDPR.”"

  • Fake-porn videos are being weaponized to harass and humiliate women: ‘Everybody is a potential target’

    Date published: 
    December 30, 2018

    "Danielle Citron, a University of Maryland law professor who has studied ways to combat online abuse, says the country is in desperate need of a more comprehensive criminal statute that would cover what she calls “invasions of sexual privacy and assassinations of character.” “We need real deterrents,” she said. “Otherwise, it’s just a game of whack-a-mole.”"

  • California Could Soon Have Its Own Version of the Internet

    Date published: 
    December 29, 2018

    "Others note that California’s rules aren't radical departures from how the internet already works. "I think that California, like Brussels, certainly might set the bar for compliance on several important tech issues," says Woodrow Hartzog, a professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University. "But this might not lead to balkanization in the way we’re seeing in China and Russia."

  • Your corner store could be Congress' next privacy challenge

    Date published: 
    December 21, 2018

    "Harlan Yu, the Executive Director of Upturn who has studied the use of body-worn cameras, said that it is safe to assume that data collection in the brick-and-mortar world "is just going to grow larger over the coming years.""

  • Top cybersecurity legislation of 2019

    Date published: 
    December 21, 2018

    "“With the breaking news of the dramatic passage of California’s new privacy law, AB 375, the strictest privacy measure in the nation, along with the coming into force of the European GDPR and SCOTUS decision in Carpenter – it’s clear privacy has risen to the top of policymakers’ agenda worldwide,” said Omer Tene, Chief Knowledge Officer of the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP). “Now, industry will need to adapt.” Support for a national law that addresses privacy issues has grown.

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