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CIS in the news.

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  • Uber tracking raises privacy concerns

    Date published: 
    November 19, 2016

    "The FTC has cracked down on companies that violate their own privacy policies on how they handle data, but have a lot of latitude as long as they comply with their own policies, said University of Washington law professor Ryan Calo.

  • Frankenstein’s paperclips

    Date published: 
    June 25, 2016

    "Deep learning, with its ability to spot patterns and find clusters of similar examples, has obvious potential to fight crime—and allow authoritarian governments to spy on their citizens. Chinese authorities are analysing people’s social-media profiles to assess who might be a dissident, says Patrick Lin, a specialist in the ethics of AI at Stanford Law School.

  • Why the US government should take Tesla up on its offer to share Autopilot data

    Date published: 
    June 23, 2016

    "While the proposition was informal, the Department of Transportation, said Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina who specializes in legal aspects of autonomous driving, "should absolutely jump at Tesla's offer."

    This kind of data, Smith said, is invaluable—and all kinds of organizations should be involved in sharing their information. "Government vehicles could also give us tremendous insight into the performance of drivers, vehicles, and roadways," he said.

  • Your Self-Driving Car Will Be Programmed to Kill You—Deal With It

    Date published: 
    June 23, 2016

    "Patrick Lin, the director of the Ethics + Emerging Sciences Group at California Polytechnic State University, says we humans are a fickle lot, and that we don’t always know what we want or what we can live with.

    “What we intellectually believe is true and what we in fact do may be two very different things,” he told Gizmodo. “Humans are often selfish even as they profess altruism. Car manufacturers, then, might not fully appreciate this human paradox as they offer up AI and robots to replace us behind the wheel.”"

  • Binge On doesn't live up to T-Mobile's claims, researchers say

    Date published: 
    June 22, 2016

    "But earlier this year a Stanford professor and net neutrality expert published a lengthy document claiming that Binge On "harms competition, innovation and free speech," and is likely illegal. The program constrains consumer choice by enabling users to watch video from Binge On providers but not their competitors, Barbara van Schewick wrote, and gives an unfair edge to content providers that can afford to make their video compliant with the service."

  • How to find bad drivers on the road near you

    Date published: 
    June 22, 2016

    "“We’re losing some of the granularity between car and driver that we’ve had in other contexts,” said Andrea Matwyshyn, a professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University.

    What if “bad drivers” get tracked using the app’s notifications? Do you have the right to know where any given driver might be at any time, even if he or she is on the other side of town?

    In a word, yes.

  • Legislating Against Revenge Porn: The Constitutional Pitfalls

    Date published: 
    June 21, 2016

    "Revenge porn is a relatively new, yet extremely contentious topic. The act of violating someone's privacy in this manner, exposing their most intimate of moments to world is an indefensible act of sexual harassment that can cause immense psychological and reputational harm. "Criminalizing nonconsensual pornography is…appropriate and necessary to convey the proper level of social condemnation for this behaviour," argues prominent law professor, Danielle Citron."

  • Tech Companies Fight Back After Years of Being Deluged With Secret FBI Requests

    Date published: 
    June 21, 2016

    "“Many small companies don’t read these things carefully,” Albert Gidari, a prominent national security attorney who worked on many cases involving such letters, told The Intercept during an interview.

    He said that years ago, small companies would come to him for advice on national security letters — concerned they were not even allowed to get a lawyer. Things have gotten better since then, he says — but not a whole lot. “Small companies really have no advocate.”"

     

  • Apple Tries to Peek at User Habits Without Violating Privacy

    Date published: 
    June 16, 2016

    "One reason that differential privacy hasn’t been adopted more widely is that it is difficult to get right. “It’s not quite something you can deploy in a plug-and-play fashion,” said Arvind Narayanan, an assistant professor of computer science at Princeton University. “It requires a certain level of expertise. It needs a lot of careful thinking about your data.”

  • 7 lessons from BuzzFeed’s ‘FOIA-friendly newsroom’

    Date published: 
    June 14, 2016

    "If BuzzFeed reporters are having trouble getting records, they can turn to Nabiha Syed, the company's assistant general counsel. She often handles the tough public records cases, including negotiations and appeals when requests are denied.

    “Lawyers should be the bad cop, and you should be good cop,” she said. Syed writes “very formal” appeals letters to agencies and often includes case law to back up her arguments, a tactic that she says has been successful.

  • This hacker is fighting ISIS by spamming its Twitter accounts with porn

    Date published: 
    June 14, 2016

    "Shouting down web-based terrorist recruiting cells, that’s a good thing, said Ryan Calo, professor of law at the University of Washington and co-director of the Tech Policy Lab.

    Porn on Twitter, maybe not such a good thing, he said. It could be offensive to religious Muslims (or Christians or Jews), the overwhelming majority of whom are not terrorists and want nothing to do with sexually explicit images.

  • 'Net neutrality' rules for fair internet access win in court

    Date published: 
    June 14, 2016

    "This decision is huge for the FCC's authority," said Marvin Ammori, a longtime net-neutrality advocate. "We won big on everything." That sets the stage for what Ammori and several analysts see as the next big battle. That will likely involve "zero rating" — the practice of exempting preferred video services from customer data caps."

  • The Tiny European Country That Became A Global Leader In Digital Government

    Date published: 
    June 14, 2016

    "Governments at all levels in the United States will pursue digital city initiatives, but society “will be slow to embrace such innovations because of the enormous failures in security” that have occurred in the country, such as the breach of systems at the federal Office of Personnel Management, said Albert Gidari, director of privacy at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School.

  • T-Mobile adds PBS, other partners to Binge On

    Date published: 
    June 14, 2016

    ""Binge On allows some providers to join easily and creates lasting barriers for others, especially small players, non-commercial providers, and start-ups," Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick wrote earlier this year. "As such, the program harms competition, user choice, free expression, and innovation.""

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