Press

CIS in the news.

  • The $4 trillion question

    Date published: 
    March 17, 2017

    "“Privacy preferences vary among individuals, over time, and between stated belief and actual practice,” Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina, said in an e-mail. “I would like a more candid conversation about data collection and especially use, particularly when that use may be adverse to the individual.”"

  • Irish leader's White House visit has serious undertones

    Date published: 
    March 16, 2017

    "Kenny has to "walk a tightrope," said Henry Farrell, a professor of political science and international affairs at George Washington University. Farrell said Kenny "does not want to be seen as too close to Trump or to be identified with Trump and the same time he wants to preserve a relationship with a guy who is going to be president of the United States" for the next four years."

  • Sean Spicer just suggested that Obama used British intelligence to spy on Trump. Britain isn’t happy.

    Date published: 
    March 16, 2017

    "Some people writing on intelligence and surveillance note that close working relations such as this can allow intelligence agencies to evade domestic controls. Jennifer Granick, in her new Cambridge University Press book, American Spies: Modern Surveillance, Why You Should Care, and What To Do About It, notes that Five Eyes countries aren’t supposed to spy on one another’s citizens. However, she says that the NSA has prepared policies that would allow it to spy on Five Eyes citizens without permission. She furthermore suggests that:

  • Internal Metrics Show How Often Uber’s Self-Driving Cars Need Human Help

    Date published: 
    March 16, 2017

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina law professor and a member of the US Department of Transportation’s Advisory Committee on Automation in Transportation, said it’s difficult to draw conclusions about the progress of Uber’s self-driving car program based on just one week of disengagement metrics, adding that the figures suggest that safety drivers appear to intervene regularly out of caution — even in cases where an accident may not be imminent.

  • Blocked Immigration Ban Proves Trump’s Tweets Will Haunt His Presidency

    Date published: 
    March 15, 2017

    "“Words have power and words spoken by the president have power,” says Neil Richards, a constitutional law professor at Washington University. “The medium by which those words are expressed is irrelevant.”

    “One of the reasons that presidents in the past have been reluctant to make blunt controversial statements is they can then be used against them either as a matter of politics or, as in this case, in litigation,” Richards says. “I think it shows that perhaps Twitter is not the best medium for weighing in on complicated questions of policy.”"
  • Facebook data 'off-limits' for spy tools

    Date published: 
    March 14, 2017

    "Malkia Cyril, executive director of the Center for Media Justice, said: "When technology companies allow their platforms and devices to be used to conduct mass surveillance of activists and other targeted communities, it chills democratic dissent and gives authoritarianism a licence to thrive.

    "It's clear there is more work to be done to protect communities of colour from social media spying, censorship and harassment.""

  • Facebook bars developers from using data for surveillance

    Date published: 
    March 13, 2017

    "It was also unclear how the companies would enforce their policies, said Malkia Cyril, executive director of the Center for Media Justice, a nonprofit that opposes government use of social media for surveillance. Inside corporations, "is the will there, without constant activist pressure, to enforce these rules?" Cyril said."

  • California’s Finally Ready for Truly Driverless Cars

    Date published: 
    March 11, 2017

    "One thing missing from the regs: any driving test to pass before letting the robot fly solo. Instead, companies will “self-certify” their vehicles. “That’s like me going to the DMV and saying, believe me, I’m an excellent driver,” says Ryan Calo, who studies robotics law at the University of Washington School of Law. “It makes me a little nervous, honestly.” He would rather see a common requirement, or at least have a third party check the cars out before they hit the public streets."

  • Assange: WikiLeaks will help tech firms defend against CIA hacking

    Date published: 
    March 10, 2017

    "Although it would be “unheard of” for the federal government to prosecute a company for using leaked classified information to improve its products, there “are some issues with the fact that the information is classified,” said Jennifer Granick, director of civil liberties at Stanford Law School’s Center for internet and Society.

    Given uncertainty about the views of the Justice Department, “I can see why legal counsel at big companies might hesitate to reach out to Julian Assange to negotiate access to classified information,” she said."

  • California Gives the Green Light to Self-Driving Cars

    Date published: 
    March 10, 2017

    "California is not the first jurisdiction to pass rules governing the deployment of fully automated vehicles. Michigan has a law contemplating driverless fleets, and Florida has a law that its drafter says covers this, too. “But this would make California the most consciously permissive jurisdiction in the world,” says Ryan Calo, a professor at the University of Washington who teaches a course on robot law. “I question the wisdom of self-certification, especially with players that are not as sophisticated. I think it would be wiser to have third parties audit the technology.”"

  • With the latest WikiLeaks revelations about the CIA – is privacy really dead?

    Date published: 
    March 9, 2017

    "“I don’t think there’s been absolute privacy in the history of mankind,” said Albert Gidari, director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. “You walk out in public and it’s no longer private. You shout from one window to another and someone will hear you in conversation.”

    “At the same time things are more intrusive, persistent, searchable, they never die. So our conception of what is or isn’t risk from a privacy perspective does change and evolve over time.”"

  • Nameless and shameless

    Date published: 
    March 9, 2017

    "As Shaheen Shariff, professor of integrated studies at McGill University explains, the protection of a pseudonym allows people to easily throw out insults and discriminatory comments without taking responsibility for their words."

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