Press

CIS in the news.

  • Civil rights groups urge Facebook to fix 'racially biased' moderation system

    Date published: 
    January 18, 2017

    "“These posts are threatening our lives,” said Malkia Cyril, executive director of the Center for Media Justice, who monitors threats posted on Black Lives Matter Facebook pages. “To be bombarded by this hateful violent rhetoric day in and day out ... the photos of lynchings, photos of dead black people at the hands of white Ku Klux Klan members … it’s vicious. It’s scary.”"

  • How FamilyTreeNow Makes Stalking Easy

    Date published: 
    January 17, 2017

    "Companies rarely get in trouble if someone the uses personal information they sell in an unauthorized way, creating a “Wild West” where data brokers and people-search engines aren’t closely regulated, says Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and the author of Hate Crimes in Cyberspace. “There are businesses that from low to high, small to big, that don’t care about FCRA,” Citron said. “They are scofflaws.”

  • Devices sprout ears: What do Alexa and Siri mean for privacy?

    Date published: 
    January 14, 2017

    "For the Echo, however, it’s more complicated. “The cost of the device is not the ultimate revenue for these companies – advertising and personal information are what's at the end of the rainbow for them,” explains Albert Gidari, the director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, in an email to the Christian Science Monitor."

  • EPA Charges Against Fiat Chrysler Put Software In The Legal Spotlight

    Date published: 
    January 14, 2017

    "“Evidence and context comes into play,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a former transportation engineer who teaches technology and mobility law at the University of South Carolina Law School and is an advisor to the Transportation Dept. on automation. Are there going to be memos explaining how engineers designed the software to get around federal testing procedures? As opposed to a design decision that generates inconsistent results?

  • Four Questions For: Ryan Calo

    Date published: 
    January 14, 2017

    "How do you draw the line between prosecuting a robot that does harm and its creator? Who bears the burden of the crime or wrongdoing?

    I recently got the chance to respond to a short story by a science fiction writer I admire. The author, Paulo Bacigalupi, imagines a detective investigating the “murder” of a man by his artificial companion. The robot insists it killed its owner intentionally in retaliation for abuse and demands a lawyer.

  • Signal Boost

    Date published: 
    January 12, 2017

    "“First of all, black communities been knowing that we had to code our communications,” said Malkia Cyril of the Oakland-based Center for Media Justice, who has used Signal to organize Black Lives Matter actions with other activists since 2014. “We been coding our communications since slavery. The knowledge of the need is not what’s missing for us. It’s the skills and the information.”"

  • Did defense secretary nominee James Mattis commit war crimes in Iraq?

    Date published: 
    January 11, 2017

    "At his confirmation hearing, senators should “ask about the high numbers of civilian casualties and whether there was adequate oversight and accountability,” said Beth Van Schaack, a law professor at Stanford University who served as deputy to the ambassador-at-large for war crimes issues in the Obama administration.

  • The disgusting stuff female athletes hear on social media and how they’re fighting back

    Date published: 
    January 9, 2017

    "None of these findings has surprised Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and author of the book Hate Crimes in Cyberspace.

    “It’s almost like the more different you are, the more you’re targeted for that,” said Citron, who has also experienced first-hand the type of online abuse toward women that she has spent years researching. “While men are often called mean names—and that’s not to suggest that they don’t face abuse—for women, the abuse is more likely sexually threatening and demeaning.”"

  • National cybersecurity expert weighs in on Russia hacking hearings

    Date published: 
    January 5, 2017

    "National expert Dr. Richard Forno, who is the assistant director of the University of Maryland Baltimore County's cybersecurity program, tells NewsChannel 7 Investigates he was most impressed the committee did not in his view conflate the issues of national security and hacking.

    Forno said there may be similarities between national security and hacking, but those are two separate issues.

    He was also happy to hear data integrity brought up as a national concern.

    Forno agreed the motive was likely election interference.

  • Google Publishes 8 Secrets from FBI Requests

    Date published: 
    January 4, 2017

    "“In our continued effort to increase transparency around government demands for user data, today we begin to make available to the public the National Security Letters (NSLs) we have received where, either through litigation or legislation, we have been freed of nondisclosure obligations,” stated Google’s director of law enforcement, Richard Salgado."

  • Give your car a conscience: Why driverless cars need morals

    Date published: 
    January 4, 2017

    "“We’re talking about self-driving cars, up to two tonnes of steel and machine that could crash into homes and people,” says ethicist Patrick Lin of California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. “We definitely can’t leave it up to manufacturers to do what they want.” It’s time to engage low gear – we have a moral mountain to climb."

  • Trump's 'throw-up-your-hands' approach to cybersecurity worries experts

    Date published: 
    January 3, 2017

    ""The idea that you just sort of throw up your hands and say, 'nothing can ever be secure so why try,'—that's a really dangerous posture and it's really a fundamental challenge to how cybersecurity has been handled in the United States and in other countries across the world for the last several decades," Eichensehr says."

  • Amazon Echo search warrant could spur new prosecution methods, expert says

    Date published: 
    January 3, 2017

    "yan Calo, a professor at the UW School of Law who specializes in privacy, robotics and cyberlaw issues, says the Bentonville Police Department’s fishing expedition is “unlikely to yield anything.” The reason is that the Echo sends information up to Amazon’s cloud only when it hears a wake word, usually “Alexa” or “Echo.”

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