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International Justice Day Round-Up III: Salvadoran Amnesty Law, Germany Apologizes to Namibia over Genocide, Corporate Criminality, and Colombia Ceasefire

Author(s): 
Beth Van Schaack
Publication Date: 
July 20, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

This is Part III of an international criminal justice round-up covering ten of the top developments in the field this spring and summer. Part I is here and covers the Habrécase, the travel of President Al-Bashir of Sudan, and the Open Society Justice Initiative’s report on crimes against humanity in Mexico.  Part II—which covered sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) in the Bemba case, the ICC Statute aggression amendments’ 30thratification by Palestine, and more justice for Chile—is 

International Justice Day Round-Up II: Bemba, the Crime of Aggression, and More Justice for Chile

Author(s): 
Beth Van Schaack
Publication Date: 
July 19, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

This is Part II of an International Justice Day Top-10 Round Up.  Part I—which discussed the recent judgment against Hissène Habré in the Extraordinary African Chambers, the consequences (vel non) of recent travel of President Al-Bashir to ICC States Parties, and the Open Society Justice Initiative’s finding that crimes against humanity have been committed in Mexico—is here.

International Justice Day Round-Up I: Habre, Bashir Travel, Crimes Against Humanity in Mexico

Author(s): 
Beth Van Schaack
Publication Date: 
July 18, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The field of international criminal justice has witnessed a number of important developments this spring and summer—enough to merit a proverbial top-ten list. In honor of International Justice Day on July 17th (whose official tag is #JusticeMatters), this three-part series provides background and analysis of some key judgments, jurisprudential developments, and events.

Microsoft just won a big privacy fight with the government. Here’s what that means.

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
July 15, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Over the past couple of years, the U.S. government and Microsoft have been fighting a legal battle over whether Microsoft has to provide customers’ email that is stored on company servers located in Ireland. On Thursday, a federal appeals court ruled against the government, saying Microsoft was under no legal obligation to provide the data.

This case has been very closely watched, as it has very important implications for how the U.S. legal system deals with a world where data moves easily across borders.

An open letter from technology sector leaders on Donald Trump’s candidacy for President

Author(s): 
Andrew McLaughlin
Marvin Ammori
Publication Date: 
July 15, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

We are inventors, entrepreneurs, engineers, investors, researchers, and business leaders working in the technology sector. We are proud that American innovation is the envy of the world, a source of widely-shared prosperity, and a hallmark of our global leadership.

Police Robots Could Reduce the Use of Deadly Force

Author(s): 
Yana Welinder
Publication Date: 
July 14, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The use of robots inevitably changes the equation for how police apply "use of force," a term that is broadly defined by the International Association of Chiefs of Police as the "amount of effort required by police to compel compliance by an unwilling subject."

Police Robots Need to Be Regulated to Avoid Potential Risks

Author(s): 
Elizabeth Joh
Publication Date: 
July 14, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The robot used by the Dallas police department to kill Micah Johnson — the sniper who fired into a peaceful protest and killed five police officers, injuring others — was originally designed to defuse explosives. The police attached a pound of the explosive C4 to the robot, creating a makeshift weapon out of a design that was not intended to inflict harm on people. The robot was also remote-controlled, not autonomous.

Four Days to Save the Open Internet in Europe: An Open Letter

Author(s): 
Barbara van Schewick
Publication Date: 
July 14, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Cross-posted from the World Wide Web Foundation.

The post below is an open letter to European citizens, lawmakers and regulators, from our founder and Web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee, Professor Barbara van Schewick, and Professor Larry Lessig. Join the conversation in the comments below or on Twitter using #savetheinternet or #netneutrality.

We have four days to save the open Internet in Europe

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