Publications

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Apple vulnerability is surprising, but journalists should stick with iPhones

Author(s): 
Geoffrey King
Publication Date: 
August 25, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

A rare and serious vulnerability in Apple's iOS operating system has been discovered by researchers at the University of Toronto's Citizen Lab, which today published a report detailing its findings. It is the first known remote iOS vulnerability of its kind. Disturbingly, the company behind malware designed to exploit the security flaw may have also helped target an investigative journalist in Mexico in 2015, Citizen Lab said.

Hanging Internet Users Out to Dry

Author(s): 
Marshall Erwin
Publication Date: 
August 12, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Over the past few months, a team at Mozilla has been looking closely at the recent remote hacking cases currently winding their way through the courts. Because the cases involve the possible disclosure of a potential Firefox vulnerability, we wanted to understand both the best outcome for our users and, more generally, the circumstances when courts would be the appropriate venue for such disclosures.

Rio 2016 — A Gold Medal For Cybersecurity?

Author(s): 
Scott Shackelford
Publication Date: 
August 12, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

In many cases athletes train for years, if not decades, to reach the pinnacle of their sports and represent their respective nations in the Olympic Games. Increasingly, such specters, though, are attracting another breed of competitor with very different motivations; they are perhaps out for gold, but not of the Olympic variety.

Chemical Weapons Use Returns to Syria

Author(s): 
Beth Van Schaack
Publication Date: 
August 8, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

This post is the latest installment of our “Monday Reflections” feature, in which a different Just Security editor examines the big stories from the previous week or looks ahead to key developments on the horizon.

Opinion: How to make democracy harder to hack

Author(s): 
Scott Shackelford
Publication Date: 
July 29, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

With the alleged Russian government hack of the Democratic National Convention email servers, and further leaks expected over the coming months that could influence an election, the drama of the 2016 US presidential race highlights an important point: Nefarious hackers don't just pose a ri

Why you should read Max Gladstone’s fantasy novels if you’re interested in politics

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
July 26, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Max Gladstone’s new book, “Four Roads Cross,” is the latest in his Craft Sequence. These books depict a world in which magic works — but looks a lot like corporate financial law. This is a world of political conflict between two different understandings of society. One is a traditional world of gods and their followers — where the world consists of intimate personal relations, local knowledge and the occasional human sacrifice. The other is abstract rules, quantifiable knowledge and contractual relations.

International Justice Day Round-Up III: Salvadoran Amnesty Law, Germany Apologizes to Namibia over Genocide, Corporate Criminality, and Colombia Ceasefire

Author(s): 
Beth Van Schaack
Publication Date: 
July 20, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

This is Part III of an international criminal justice round-up covering ten of the top developments in the field this spring and summer. Part I is here and covers the Habrécase, the travel of President Al-Bashir of Sudan, and the Open Society Justice Initiative’s report on crimes against humanity in Mexico.  Part II—which covered sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) in the Bemba case, the ICC Statute aggression amendments’ 30thratification by Palestine, and more justice for Chile—is 

International Justice Day Round-Up II: Bemba, the Crime of Aggression, and More Justice for Chile

Author(s): 
Beth Van Schaack
Publication Date: 
July 19, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

This is Part II of an International Justice Day Top-10 Round Up.  Part I—which discussed the recent judgment against Hissène Habré in the Extraordinary African Chambers, the consequences (vel non) of recent travel of President Al-Bashir to ICC States Parties, and the Open Society Justice Initiative’s finding that crimes against humanity have been committed in Mexico—is here.

International Justice Day Round-Up I: Habre, Bashir Travel, Crimes Against Humanity in Mexico

Author(s): 
Beth Van Schaack
Publication Date: 
July 18, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The field of international criminal justice has witnessed a number of important developments this spring and summer—enough to merit a proverbial top-ten list. In honor of International Justice Day on July 17th (whose official tag is #JusticeMatters), this three-part series provides background and analysis of some key judgments, jurisprudential developments, and events.

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