Blog Posts: Filtered

Can a New Broadcasting Law in Europe Make Internet Hosts Monitor Their Users?

The European Commission is making major steps forward in its new Digital Single Market strategy. One important part, the Platform Liability consultation, pointedly asked whether Internet intermediaries should “do more” to weed out illegal or harmful content on their platforms – in other words, to proactively police the information posted by users. Read more about Can a New Broadcasting Law in Europe Make Internet Hosts Monitor Their Users?

DMCA Classic, DMCA Turbo: Major new empirical research on notice and takedown operations

Good data about Notice and Takedown can be hard to find. Jennifer Urban and Laura Quilter’s seminal 2006 study has long been the gold standard, combining rigorous number-crunching with what must have been incredibly tedious substantive review of the copyright claims in DMCA notices. Read more about DMCA Classic, DMCA Turbo: Major new empirical research on notice and takedown operations

Policy Debates over EU Platform Liability Laws: New Human Rights Case Law in the Real World

This is the last of four posts on the European Court of Human Rights’ (ECHR) rulings in Delfi v. Estonia and MTE v. Hungary. In both cases, national courts held online news portals liable for comments posted by their users – even though the platforms did not know about the comments. Read more about Policy Debates over EU Platform Liability Laws: New Human Rights Case Law in the Real World

Litigating Platform Liability in Europe: New Human Rights Case Law in the Real World

This is the third of four posts on the European Court of Human Rights’ (ECHR) rulings in Delfi v. Estonia and MTE v. Hungary. In both cases, national courts held online news portals liable for comments posted by their users – even though the platforms did not know about them. These rulings effectively required platforms to monitor and delete user comments in order to avoid liability. Read more about Litigating Platform Liability in Europe: New Human Rights Case Law in the Real World

Policing Online Comments in Europe: New Human Rights Case Law in the Real World

This is the second of four posts on real-world consequences of the European Court of Human Rights’ (ECHR) rulings in Delfi v. Estonia and MTE v. Hungary. Both cases arose from national court rulings that effectively required online news portals to monitor users’ speech in comment forums. The first case, Delfi, condoned a monitoring requirement in a case involving threats and hate speech. Read more about Policing Online Comments in Europe: New Human Rights Case Law in the Real World

New Intermediary Liability Cases from the European Court of Human Rights: What Will They Mean in the Real World?

Last summer, the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) delivered a serious setback to free expression on the Internet. The Court held, in Delfi v. Estonia, that a government could compel a news site to monitor its users’ online comments about articles.* This winter, the Court’s lower chamber ruled the other way in MTE v. Read more about New Intermediary Liability Cases from the European Court of Human Rights: What Will They Mean in the Real World?

Series Conclusion and Summary: Intermediaries and Free Expression Under the GDPR, in Brief

Europe’s pending General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) threatens free expression and access to information on the Internet.  The threat comes from erasure requirements that work in ways the drafters may not have intended -- and that are not necessary to achieve the Regulation’s data protection purposes.  Read more about Series Conclusion and Summary: Intermediaries and Free Expression Under the GDPR, in Brief

Pages