Press

CIS in the news.

  • Congress Is Considering Letting 100,000 Self-Driving Cars Hit the Road

    Date published: 
    July 20, 2017

    "These new robo-cars won’t have to meet existing safety standards for manned automobiles, but manufacturers will have to petition the National Highway Safety and Transportation Bureau, a federal agency tasked with reducing vehicle-related crashes, for an exemption, explained Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor and self-driving car expert at Stanford University. That means that automakers will need to make a clear case that their self-driving technology is safe enough to drive alongside cars with humans at the wheel."

  • Cyberattack on Ukrainian clinics, pharmacies worries experts

    Date published: 
    July 19, 2017

    "Scott Shackelford, the chair of the Cybersecurity Program at Indiana University in Bloomington, said that the past progress toward setting international norms for behavior in cyberspace "is in danger of eroding."

    "What's needed is leadership, and right now that's in dangerously short supply, especially coming from Washington," he said."

  • Elon Musk's Freak-Out Over Killer Robots Distracts from Our Real AI Problems

    Date published: 
    July 17, 2017

    "Musk has spoken out before about AI end times, in 2014 he likened working on the technology to “summoning the demon.” His propensity for raising sci-fi scenarios comes despite being very directly exposed to some of the near-term questions raised by artificial intelligence. “It’s always interesting hearing Elon Musk talk about AI killing us when a person died in a car he built that was self-driving,” says Ryan Calo, who works on policy issues related to robotics at the University of Washington."

  • Report faults California’s electronic monitoring of youth

    Date published: 
    July 17, 2017

    "“We learned that the monitors may be setting kids up for failure,” said Catherine Crump, director of the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic at Berkeley Law, which partnered with the East Bay Community Law Center to produce the report. “The terms are too onerous, kids are monitored for too long, and the rules are arbitrarily enforced.”"

  • Will Massive Net-Neutrality Protest Change the FCC’s Mind?

    Date published: 
    July 12, 2017

    "But Barbara van Schewick, a law professor and net-neutrality expert at Stanford University, believes that the FCC's independence has its limits. "Chairman Pai is up for re-nomination," she said, adding that Republican lawmakers were "burnt really badly'' by their repeal of the commission's impending internet-privacy rules earlier this year. "I think that has demonstrated to a lot of members that these are issues that their constituents care about passionately.""

  • Women in IT Security: Eight Women to Watch

    Date published: 
    July 10, 2017

    "Jennifer Stisa Granick is an attorney, educator and the director of civil liberties for the Center for Internet and Society (CIS) at Stanford Law School. A prominent advocate for intellectual property law, free speech and privacy, she has represented a number of high-profile hackers, including internet activist Aaron Swartz.

  • Sorry, But You Need to Care About Blac Chyna and Rob Kardashian

    Date published: 
    July 8, 2017

    "Yet, those fighting to criminalize nonconsensual porn at an national level worry about the detrimental effects of a Kardashian revenge porn battle. "We’ve had momentum over the last couple years," says Danielle Citron, who teaches law at the University of Maryland. "Big celebrity moments like Jennifer Lawrence's nude photo leak have played a important educative role. But this moment could take us backward.""

  • LinkedIn, HiQ spat presents big questions for freedom, innovation

    Date published: 
    July 8, 2017

    "“It seems like the crux of the dispute is a business decision on LinkedIn’s part about building out their analytics functionality, and they view HiQ as a competitor (or) threat,” Scott Shackelford, chairman of the cybersecurity program at Indiana University in Bloomington, wrote in an email. “I’m all for protecting the privacy of users who demand it, but it seems like the question here is how (far) ... can firms go to guard against data scraping of public profiles.”"

  • Justice Eludes 298 Killed in the Shoot-Down of Malaysia Air Flight 17

    Date published: 
    July 7, 2017

    "“They’ve got to keep the public pressure on because that is what finally made the Lockerbie case move forward—this glaring impunity,” said Beth Van Schaack, a professor at Stanford Law School and a former State Department official who has blogged about the MH17 case. “People kept the fight alive, and eventually they were able to take the case forward.” Justice in the aircraft incident, she said, “is a 10-year process, not a two-year process.”"

  • Trolling victim takes neo-Nazi website to court

    Date published: 
    July 7, 2017

    "US laws around hate on the internet date back to the earliest chat rooms and bulletin boards. By the '90s, they'd begun to address electronic harassment. But the laws were narrow and generally addressed a method, say harassment over the phone, rather than a broad range of intimidating behavior, says Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and author of the book "Hate Crimes in Cyberspace." And they aren't used often, she says.

  • 51 Times That the Aggregator Distractify Says Its Copyright Was Violated

    Date published: 
    July 6, 2017

    "Daniel Nazer, a staff attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, said facts and story concepts generally can’t be copyrighted. Short phrases like headlines or titles likely wouldn’t be subject to copyright, either, he said.

    “There’s only so many ways to say that someone used a Spotfiy playlist to break up with someone, and that fact is no more copyrightable than the fact that the president fired the F.B.I. director,” he said."
  • Chicago Schools to Students: Submit to Our Choices for Your Futures or No Diploma

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2017
    Hey, Chicago parents: Are you ready for a bunch of government officials to decide whether your teen has appropriate post-high-school plans?
     
    If you're not, too bad. Your city's school district is pushing forward with its plan to demand—as a requirement to graduate—that seniors prove to the school that they have a plan for the future. What's more, this plan has to match what school administrators think your kid's future should look like.
     

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