Press

CIS in the news.

  • California's plan to protect net neutrality will shield consumers from telecom bullies

    Date published: 
    April 20, 2018

    "At the hearing, Barbara van Schewick, director of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, succinctly put the kibosh on this notion. She observed that from 2015 through 2017, Comcast repurchased $16 billion of its own stock. "If they took this money they could deploy a fiber network to 80 to 160 million people in the United States." She could have gone further: In 2017, Comcast, Verizon and AT&T earned a combined profit of $82.3 billion on revenues of more than $371 billion.

  • Government hacking tactics questioned at OURSA

    Date published: 
    April 20, 2018

    "Jennifer Granick had harsh words at the Our Security Advocates Conference for the growing state of mass surveillance and government hacking in the United States.

    Granick, surveillance and cybersecurity counsel at the American Civil Liberties Union, took the stage at OURSA on Tuesday to discuss the state of modern surveillance and hacking performed by the U.S. government, arguing that both cross the line of traditional legal searches.

  • OpSec for activists

    Date published: 
    April 20, 2018

    "We caught up with Malkia Cyril, founder and executive director of the group, to talk about organizing, digital privacy, and what comes next for Defend Our Movements. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

  • All-woman tech panel warns of inadequate online legal protections

    Date published: 
    April 18, 2018

    "Jennifer Granick, surveillance and cybersecurity counsel at the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), noted that “increasingly, modern surveillance is mass surveillance” which can be facilitated by new technologies and the internet.

    Secretive large scale surveillance differs from warrant-directed searches by the volume and depth of data and could be abetted by the ease of converting in-home appliances with microphones and cameras into “surveillance machines”, she said."

  • Bad news for AT&T and Comcast: Calif. Senate panel OKs net neutrality bill

    Date published: 
    April 18, 2018

    "Wiener's legislation is "the only state-level bill that fully restores all of the 2015 net neutrality protections," Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick told the committee. "That's why it's widely viewed as a net neutrality model bill, and that's why [former] FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, who literally wrote the 2015 order, supports this bill."

  • Tesla Keeps Using Disputed Crash Stat to Defend Autopilot

    Date published: 
    April 18, 2018

    "“If Tesla’s going to keep asserting that, and particularly if they’re going to keep crediting NHTSA for it, then I think they need to provide the necessary analysis, caveats and qualifications behind that number,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina’s School of Law, who studies driverless-car regulations.

  • How Government Pressure Has Turned Transparency Reports From Free Speech Celebrations To Censorship Celebrations

    Date published: 
    April 17, 2018

    "Indeed, as Europe is pushing for more and more use of platforms to censor, it's important that someone gets them to understand how these plans almost inevitably backfire. Daphne Keller at Stanford recently submitted a comment to the EU about its plan, noting just how badly demands for censorship of "illegal content" can turn around and do serious harm.

  • Net neutrality rules move past first hurdle in California

    Date published: 
    April 17, 2018

    "Stanford Law School professor Barbara van Schewick countered that stance, saying internet providers could simply pay for the infrastructure themselves. Meanwhile, a lack of competition means residents in parts of the state have access to only one internet provider, a situation she says the lack of net neutrality regulations will exacerbate.

    "The problem is not that we need to get them more money that they don't already have," she said. "The problem is that we don't have competition.""

     

  • Google Responds to Troubling Report of Apps Tracking Kids

    Date published: 
    April 17, 2018

    "Scott Shackelford, associate professor of Business Law and Ethics at Indiana University's Kelley School of Business, and Cybersecurity Program Chair, at IU-Bloomington told us "This important study highlights the sad fact that tech companies are simply not doing enough to comply with the regulatory requirements Congress has put into place to help protect vulnerable, and impressionable, kids."

  • When Mr. Gates Went to Washington

    Date published: 
    April 14, 2018

    "Tom Rubin, a former senior lawyer at Microsoft who is now a lecturer at Stanford University, sees many parallels between the government scrutiny of Microsoft and of Facebook, which he discussed with a class on tech policy at the school this past week.

    “They both involve an allegation that a digital gatekeeper, with insufficient internal controls, drove for dominance by harming the ecosystem in which it operates,” said Mr. Rubin, who was an assistant United States attorney before joining Microsoft.

  • Why WhatsApp is Brazil’s go-to political weapon

    Date published: 
    April 13, 2018

    "Nor would WhatsApp breaking its encryption for Brazil’s Supreme Court actually alleviate the problem, according to Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. The right to private conversations is vital to democracy according to Pfefferkorn, who described public policy attempts to undermine the app’s encryption as “an extremely dangerous path to walk down.”

  • AI is an excuse for Facebook to keep messing up

    Date published: 
    April 13, 2018

    "Beyond that, the kinds of content Zuckerberg focused on in the hearings were images and videos. From what we know about Facebook’s automated system, at its core, it’s a search mechanism across a shared database of hashes. If a video of a beheading goes up that has been previously been identified as terrorist content in the database — by Facebook or one of its partners — it’ll be automatically recognized and taken down.

  • Can Big Automakers Be Trusted With Big Data?

    Date published: 
    April 13, 2018

    "“It's not just that automated vehicles will be supercomputers,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who studies the impact of autonomous technology on society. “They'll be mobile supercomputers powered by big batteries, fed by all kinds of capable sensors both inside and outside the vehicle, and connected back to huge companies with even greater collective computing resources.”"

  • Cops Around the Country Can Now Unlock iPhones, Records Show

    Date published: 
    April 12, 2018

    "“The availability and affordability of these tools undercuts law enforcement's continual assertions that they need smartphone vendors to be forced to build 'exceptional access' capabilities into their devices," Riana Pfefferkorn, cryptography fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, told Motherboard in a Twitter message."

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