Press

CIS in the news.

  • How to Fix Silicon Valley’s Sexist Algorithms

    Date published: 
    November 23, 2016

    "But not everyone believes gender bias should be eliminated from the data sets. Arvind Narayanan, an assistant professor of computer science at Princeton, has also analyzed word embedding and found gender, racial, and other prejudices. But Narayanan cautions against removing bias automatically, arguing that it could skew a computer’s representation of the real world and make it less adept at making predictions or analyzing data.

  • Boston becomes latest city for driverless car tests, in partnership with nuTonomy

    Date published: 
    November 21, 2016

    "There are still no official plans for the public to test nuTonomy's vehicles in Boston. The cars will still be supervised by a "research driver," so they are far from "driverless," said Bryant Walker Smith, professor at the University of South Carolina, and an expert on the legal aspects of self-driving vehicles. And testing on public roads has been happening for years—Google has been doing it since 2009.

  • Fake News, Hate Speech and Social Media Abuse: What’s the Solution?

    Date published: 
    November 21, 2016

    "Underpinning the moves by the social media companies is a law (section 230 of the Communications Decency Act) that that gives them “a modicum of legal protection for the content that exists on their platforms, as long as they don’t veer off too much into editorial functions,” said Andrea Matwyshyn, law professor at Northeastern University and affiliate scholar at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School.

  • Rise of the drones: from policing the streets to painting your house

    Date published: 
    November 19, 2016

    "Such is the hype. But for every tech company with its head in the clouds, there are problems to bring them back down to earth. “There are big technical challenges,” says Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington. “There’s a bunch of PhD theses that need to be completed before you can build a drone to autonomously police an area, find intruders, and use facial recognition to know who is meant to be there. Plus, having these things stay aloft beyond a few minutes is non-trivial.”"

  • Interconnectedness and Manufacturer Responsibility in Automated Vehicles

    Date published: 
    November 18, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law and (by courtesy) the School of Engineering, and Affiliate Scholar, Center of Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, argues that AVs and many other products are now connected to their manufacturers in ways that permit the manufacturers to maintain "information, access and control over the products, product users and product uses" in ways that can "expand the legal obligations and liabilities of automotive companies toward people harmed by their ­products."

  • It’s time to get rid of the Facebook “news feed,” because it’s not news

    Date published: 
    November 18, 2016

    "Facebook's highly personalized algorithmic curation of its users' newsfeeds falls in a legal gray area with respect to CDA 230. As you know, CDA 230 provides immunity for "interactive computer services," drawing a line between that category and "information content providers." But it's not entirely clear when the former becomes the latter; in other words, it's not clear when an intermediary engages in enough editing of third-party content that it becomes an "information content provider" and loses CDA 230 immunity.

  • Thai Website Shutdowns Soar After King's Death

    Date published: 
    November 17, 2016

    "Daphne Keller at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society said internet companies doing business in countries with laws restricting speech know they will be expected to comply with the rules. One common means of doing so without deleting lawful speech elsewhere is to offer country-specific versions of services, like YouTube Thailand, said Keller.

    "The company can then honor national law on the version of the service that is targeted to, and primarily used in, that country," she said."

  • Anti-Defamation League Task Force Issues Recommendations to Stem Hate That Surged on Social Media During 2016 Presidential Campaign

    Date published: 
    November 17, 2016

    "Danielle Citron, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland and member of the Task Force added, “The ADL Task Force lays out important suggestions for platforms that harmonize with their commitment to free expression. It wisely offers strategies for enhancing the transparency and fairness of the reporting process, expanding opportunities for bystanders to assist victims, and building anti-harassment tools into platforms.”"

  • Can You Crash An Autonomous Car Ethically?

    Date published: 
    November 16, 2016

    "“These are decisions that need to be thought about or programmed in advance,” said Patrick Lin, director of the Ethics and Emerging Sciences Group at California Polytechnic State University. “Either way leads to problems.” In either case, you’re targeting a vehicle class through no fault of its own."

  • Google patent shows vision of self-driving cars flocking to pick up customers

    Date published: 
    November 15, 2016

    "“You could see Google as an operator of these networks, either directly owning and operating the vehicles, or closely partnered with another entity or entities that does,” said Stanford School of Law professor and autonomous-vehicle expert Bryant Walker Smith. For production of self-driving cars, Google would probably work with a carmaker, Smith said.

  • Long-Distance Search Warrant Power Coming Dec. 1

    Date published: 
    November 14, 2016

    "Google Law Enforcement and Information Security Director Richard Salgado said the Department of Justice has made assurances about what it would do concerning the amended Rule 41 “and those are taken as sincere representations.”

  • Donald Trump is about to control the most powerful surveillance machine in history

    Date published: 
    November 14, 2016

    "Secrecy is crucial because it enables more invasive and disruptive forms of surveillance, according to University of Washington Professor Ryan Calo, who has written extensively on the topic. As long as surveillance programs are secret, it’s nearly impossible to hold them in check — and without a steady stream of whistleblowers, any new programs are likely to stay secret. As Calo told The Verge, “It’s very difficult for the public to resist surveillance that they don’t know about.”"

  • Internet data pricing battle heats up in U.S. with AT&T and FCC following Canadian hearing

    Date published: 
    November 11, 2016

    "Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick told CRTC commissioners they could “absolutely” set a precedent in other jurisdictions.

    The CRTC must choose whether to deal with zero-rating complaints as it stands now on a case-by-case basis, ban it altogether or develop a set of guidelines on when it is acceptable.

    “I do believe there is precedential value,” said van Schewick, whose warmly received presentation argued against zero-rating especially when service providers own the content, stating it could harm innovation and competition.

  • Here’s How President Trump Could Destroy Net Neutrality

    Date published: 
    November 10, 2016

    "“Everything we’ve accomplished over the last ten years is now in jeopardy,” said Malkia Cyril, co-founder and executive director of the Center for Media Justice, a nonprofit group that advocates for digital freedom and inclusion. “From net neutrality to broadband privacy to prison phone reform and the Lifeline expansion, that’s all at risk now.”"

  • GDPR will require 75,000 DPOs worldwide, study shows

    Date published: 
    November 10, 2016

    "Appointing a data protection officer is just the beginning, said Omer Tene, vice-president of research and education at the IAPP. “Organisations will need to ensure DPOs are well qualified and trained in the growing body of knowledge of the privacy profession, including law, technology and data management best practices,” he said."

  • 75,000 Data Protection Officers Needed By 2018 To Handle EU Law

    Date published: 
    November 9, 2016

    ""Appointing a data protection officer is just the beginning," said IAPP VP of research and education Omer Tene, in a statement. "Organizations will need to ensure DPOs are well qualified and trained in the growing body of knowledge of the privacy profession, including law, technology and data management best practices.”"

  • Cybersecurity experts: Risk of electronic voter fraud slim but real

    Date published: 
    November 8, 2016

    "Similarly, Scott Shackelford, an associate professor of business law and ethics at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business and senior fellow at the IU Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research, has spent his sabbatical from IU this semester working as a cybersecurity research fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School and researching voter fraud methods in the U.S. and around the world.

    Shackelford’s fellowship research has focused on five major ways to manipulate the outcome of an election electronically.

  • How Realistic Is Tesla’s Plan to Drive Across the U.S. Completely Autonomously?

    Date published: 
    November 8, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, an automotive engineer and lawyer who specializes in autonomous driving, said he believes the trip is definitely possible, but that people need to understand the difference between fully autonomous driving and partial automation. In this case, partial automation means it’s not full-time self-driving, but rather a mode that can be switched on where the car can handle all the driving without the need for human input. This would classify as level 4 automation and anything under level 4 is basically advanced cruise control that can brake and steer.

  • Ex-Playboy Playmate's Charge in 'Body Shaming' Case Could Send Legal Shockwaves

    Date published: 
    November 4, 2016

    ""When you do hear about lawsuits with respect to photos on social media, it usually is in a civil action," Professor Jeffrey Vagle, executive director of the Center for Technology, Innovation & Competition at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, told NBC News. "This is a big deal because it is a criminal action.""

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