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  • Uber tracking raises privacy concerns

    Date published: 
    November 19, 2016

    "The FTC has cracked down on companies that violate their own privacy policies on how they handle data, but have a lot of latitude as long as they comply with their own policies, said University of Washington law professor Ryan Calo.

  • WhatsApp to Share User Data With Facebook

    Date published: 
    August 25, 2016

    "Thursday’s changes likely can’t be applied to data users have already shared with WhatsApp, said Ryan Calo, a professor of law at the University of Washington. “You can’t make a change like this retroactively under the FTC’s view of deception,” he said."

  • Uber to introduce self-driving cars to its fleet in coming weeks

    Date published: 
    August 18, 2016

    "Uber's move to carry people with autonomous vehicles is not surprising, given the company's history of pushing into gray areas where there is little or no regulation, said Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina professor who studies self-driving technology.

    Pennsylvania, he said, has no laws governing autonomous cars and how they relate to ride-hailing, but local laws may require a driver behind the wheel. By using human backup drivers, Uber basically is going to test the technology and take people along for the ride, he said.

  • T-Mobile's New 'Unlimited' Data Plan Throttles Video, Slows Hotspots

    Date published: 
    August 18, 2016

    "Net neutrality advocates criticized the feature on a number of fronts, including that the company's technical requirements excluded some video distributors at launch. In January, Stanford professor Barbara van Schewick said in a report that Binge On undermined net neutrality by giving people incentives to watch videos from a select group of companies. "A core principle of net neutrality is that ISPs should not pick winners and losers online by favoring some applications over others," she writes. "But that’s exactly what Binge On does," she wrote."

  • Uber's big test in the steel city

    Date published: 
    August 18, 2016

    "By using human backup drivers, Uber is basically testing the technology and taking people along for the ride, said Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina professor who studies self-driving technology.

    "Part of this is marketing in the sense that they're going to be doing continued research and development of these systems," he said."

     

  • Uber To Roll Out Self-Driving Cars In Pittsburgh

    Date published: 
    August 18, 2016

    ""Pittsburgh is going to have some self-driving car tourism. That's exciting for them," says Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina who monitors law and policy developments in autonomous technology.

    An Uber staff member (an engineer or specially trained driver) will be inside, as the human co-pilot. So, to be clear, it's not a car without a human. "If we were putting this in terms of a tightrope walk, there would definitely be a net," Smith says.

  • Uber to launch fleet of self-driving Volvos. Will Pittsburgh residents hop in?

    Date published: 
    August 18, 2016

    "“Uber is doing the same thing many companies have been doing,” Bryant Walker Smith, an engineering professor at the University of South Carolina, told the NewsHour. But the big news is Uber inviting the general public into its self-driving cars, he said.

    Walker Smith said that consumers should expect to see more changes in transportation in the next couple of years.

  • Ford plans to mass produce a 'no driver required' autonomous vehicle by 2021

    Date published: 
    August 16, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, an expert in legal aspects of autonomous driving, said that Ford's move points to how it plans to emphasize transportation as a service, since the Ford customers will be sharing the vehicles.

    "This is a good thing for everyone," said Smith. "Users won't have to pay upfront for a car that could be obsolete in a few years, and Ford won't have to depend on these customers to maintain those vehicles. Users can pay-as-they-ride, and Ford can get-paid-as-they-ride."

  • Facebook Can’t Win Against Ad Blockers, and Here’s the Proof

    Date published: 
    August 15, 2016

    "Narayanan concludes in his post that Facebook’s anti-ad-blocking campaign is doomed, at least if it continues in the current vein of acting as if the social network can somehow neutralize ad blockers completely.

    “This is a simple proof of concept, but the detection method could easily be made much more robust without incurring a performance penalty,” he writes. “All of this must be utterly obvious to the smart engineers at Facebook, so the whole ‘unblockable ads’ PR push seems likely to be a big bluff.”"

  • Facebook Has Difficult Road to Make Ads Unblockable

    Date published: 
    August 15, 2016

    "“Facebook engineers could try harder to obfuscate the differences. For example, they could use non-human-readable element IDs to make it harder to figure out what’s going on, or even randomize the IDs on every page load. We’re surprised they’re not already doing this, given the grandiose announcement of the company’s intent to bypass ad blockers,” Arvind Narayanan and Grant Storey of the CITP wrote in a post analyzing the situation."

  • Donald Trump wants ‘extreme vetting’ to stop terrorists at border

    Date published: 
    August 15, 2016

    "“The policies and ‘pillars’ that were offered as solutions were often vague, and it is not clear they’d actually solve the serious challenges that exist in the region,” said Brian Nussbaum, a terrorism analyst at Rockefeller College of Public Affairs & Policy at the University at Albany, State University of New York. “As in several other areas of policy, Trump’s approach to foreign policy and national security seems a bit nebulous, focused on slogans rather concrete policies.”"

  • Indiana businesses targeted as ransomware viruses spread across U.S.

    Date published: 
    August 15, 2016

    "Hackers’ favorite targets include health systems and local governments, said Scott Shackelford, a professor of business law and ethics in the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University.

    “If you look at the trend lines in the last two years, it’s becoming more common,” he said. “For a long time, this was part of a long-term trend of cyber extortion. This was run-of-the-mill behavior in Eastern Europe, Brazil and Latin America.”"

  • An Internet Freedom Fighter

    Date published: 
    August 15, 2016

    "Even the most fervent internet user has to log off sometimes. That’s what Barbara van Schewick had in mind for her family vacation at a farmhouse near Cologne. But it’s hard to escape your work when you are one of the world’s most sought-after internet consultants.

    Even on vacation, Ms. van Schewick, who heads Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society, spends her days reading emails and writing position papers.

    “I shouldn’t be sitting in front of the computer,” she says. “But the battle is really on now.”

  • Navy looking at teaching robots how to behave

    Date published: 
    August 14, 2016

    "Peter Asaro, vice-chair of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control — which is campaigning for a treaty to ban “killer robots” — questions whether a machine can be programmed to make the sort of moral and ethical choices that a human does before taking someone’s life.

    Soldiers must consider whether their actions are justified and risks that they take are proportionate to a threat, he said.

  • Bridgewater, N.S. Sexting Case Will Test Canada's New Law

    Date published: 
    August 14, 2016

    "McGill University education professor Shaheen Shariff studied the "digitally empowered'' generation of kids in a 2013 project that used surveys and focus groups involving 1,088 tweens and teens in two Canadian and two U.S. cities.

    Shariff estimates that over half of participants confirmed receiving or sending intimate images, adding that the figures on the prevalence of sexting will vary among studies.

  • Kämpferin fürs freie Internet

    Date published: 
    August 12, 2016

    "Auch einer der größten Fans des Internets schaltet gern mal ab. Und eigentlich hatte Barbara van Schewick genau das jetzt vor. Aus dem glutheißen Südwesten der USA ist die deutsche Professorin, die an der Eliteuni Stanford das renommierte Center for Internet and Society leitet, ins sommerfeuchte Rheinland geflogen.

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