Press

CIS in the news.

  • Signal Boost

    Date published: 
    January 12, 2017

    "“First of all, black communities been knowing that we had to code our communications,” said Malkia Cyril of the Oakland-based Center for Media Justice, who has used Signal to organize Black Lives Matter actions with other activists since 2014. “We been coding our communications since slavery. The knowledge of the need is not what’s missing for us. It’s the skills and the information.”"

  • Did defense secretary nominee James Mattis commit war crimes in Iraq?

    Date published: 
    January 11, 2017

    "At his confirmation hearing, senators should “ask about the high numbers of civilian casualties and whether there was adequate oversight and accountability,” said Beth Van Schaack, a law professor at Stanford University who served as deputy to the ambassador-at-large for war crimes issues in the Obama administration.

  • The disgusting stuff female athletes hear on social media and how they’re fighting back

    Date published: 
    January 9, 2017

    "None of these findings has surprised Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and author of the book Hate Crimes in Cyberspace.

    “It’s almost like the more different you are, the more you’re targeted for that,” said Citron, who has also experienced first-hand the type of online abuse toward women that she has spent years researching. “While men are often called mean names—and that’s not to suggest that they don’t face abuse—for women, the abuse is more likely sexually threatening and demeaning.”"

  • At Halfway Mark, Few Details About Police Body Camera Effort

    Date published: 
    December 16, 2016

    "Most large and mid-size cities with some form of a body camera program haven't been forthcoming once their programs are underway, said Harlan Yu, a principal at Upturn, a consulting firm working with civil rights groups to study police body camera programs.

    One exception is Washington, D.C., where the law requires police to release a report twice a year about body camera usage, he said."

  • Who would want access to 1 billion Yahoo accounts?

    Date published: 
    December 15, 2016

    "If this most recent attack is also state-sponsored, says Albert Gidari, the director of Privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, "it's government espionage that's really at issue."

    Gidari says the size of the breach fits the profile of a government actor, which is typically motivated by an interest in collecting "large volumes of data that gets warehoused for future reference."

  • Uber's self-driving cars put tech's 'move fast, break things' credo to the test

    Date published: 
    December 15, 2016

    "Uber might have a plausible legal argument, based on the text of the legislation, said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and a specialist in autonomous vehicle law. But the intent of the law, he said, is “in large part about building trust, and Uber is not building any trust in its systems or practices by doing this.”

  • Uber's new driverless fleet in San Francisco swiftly declared 'illegal' by California DMV

    Date published: 
    December 15, 2016

    ""I wonder how this particular step fits into Uber's long game," said Bryant Walker Smith, associate professor at the University of South Carolina and an expert in the legal implications of autonomous driving.

    Smith raised concern with the definitions around driverless vehicles years ago, which, he said is "at odds with the goal of the regime—to build trust in the systems and developers.""

  • California DMV Calls Uber’s Autonomous Autos ‘Illegal’

    Date published: 
    December 15, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina assistant professor of law and expert on autonomous car law, said Uber may have a plausible argument as the law allows some interpretation. Still, he said in an email, Uber’s actions are “in tension with the law if interpreted in context. This was a law intended to apply to aspirationally autonomous vehicles. It was in large part about building trust, and Uber is not building any trust in its systems or practices by doing this.”"

  • FCC Chair Tom Wheeler to Resign, Leaving 'Remarkable Legacy'

    Date published: 
    December 15, 2016

    ""During his tenure, despite industry roots, Wheeler proved to be a leader who heeded democracy's call," said Malkia Cyril, executive director at the Center for Media Justice. "Wheeler was a chairman willing to act in defense of the public interest, and in defiance of industry pressure and partisan politics."

  • Uber’s Robo-Car Test in SF Is a Middle Finger to Regulators

    Date published: 
    December 15, 2016

    "Uber’s got a good argument when it comes to the text of the law, if not the spirit. “Clearly California and Nevada [which has similar rules] wanted to build a regime of trust,” says Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law who studies self-driving vehicles. Those states wanted to encourage companies to test, keep the public in the know, and share information that helps everyone move forward."

  • FCC taking hard look at ‘free’ data for video services

    Date published: 
    December 14, 2016

    "Earlier this year, Stanford Law Professor Barbara van Schewick wrote a report examining T-Mobile’s Binge On zero-rated program, which offers “unlimited” streaming of content from certain providers, like Netflix, Hulu and HBO.

    In the report, van Schewick concluded that despite T-Mobile’s assurances that Binge On is open to any legal streaming provider at no cost, significant technical barriers to entry still work to discriminate against smaller streaming services.

  • DMV to Uber: Yank your self-driving cars — or else

    Date published: 
    December 14, 2016

    "“Roll back a few years, and public service commissions, taxicab (regulators), police and airport authorities were saying to Uber: ‘Stop doing what you’re doing; it’s unlawful,’” said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and expert on self-driving cars. “Sometimes it complied but often it did not.” Ultimately many jurisdictions ended up legalizing ride-hailing services.

  • State regulators demand Uber halt self-driving car program, threaten legal action

    Date published: 
    December 14, 2016

    "Uber’s argument takes the DMV’s rules literally, but goes against the spirit of the regulations, said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and scholar with Stanford Law School who specializes in autonomous driving.

    “You can make this argument, but it’s not one that’s going to make you friends,” he said."

  • Self-driving Ubers arrive in San Francisco

    Date published: 
    December 14, 2016

    "The law can be read that way, but doing so might cause tension between Uber and state regulators, according to Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and scholar with Stanford Law School who specializes in autonomous driving. He acknowledged that risk is unlikely to deter the company that built its entire ride-hailing business model by operating in a similar legal gray area.

  • Uber self-driving cars hit the streets of San Francisco

    Date published: 
    December 14, 2016

    "Uber's stance seems likely to upset both state officials and competitors, said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who tracked California's law as it was drafted in 2012. While an attorney could argue that Uber is reading the letter of California law correctly, Smith said, testing permits were "envisioned as a gateway, as an interim step" to launching self-driving cars on public roads.

  • Google self-driving car project steps out on its own as ‘Waymo’

    Date published: 
    December 13, 2016

    "While the self-driving car project was in Alphabet’s “X” unit for “moonshots,” there was much speculation over what the business plan or “end game” was, said Bryant Walker Smith, a risk, technology and mobility expert at Stanford University.

    The birth of Waymo, Smith said, “starts to sound like something that’s more consumer oriented.”"

  • Google reveals 8 secret letters from FBI

    Date published: 
    December 13, 2016

    "“We minimized redactions to protect privacy interests, but the content of the NSLs remain as they were when served. We are also publishing the correspondence reflecting the lifting of the nondisclosure restrictions,” Richard Salgado, Google’s director for law enforcement and information security, wrote on the company’s blog."

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