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Artificial intelligence art -- who owns the copyright?

If your pet dog Hans takes a selfie, does he own the copyright? A recent decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (“Ninth Circuit”) is instructive. It says that a monkey can’t own the copyright to his selfie. The reason? Only humans can own a copyright under U.S. law. But who owns artificial intelligence (“AI”) created artwork? This entry addresses that issue.

Stanford Law School Appoints Jennifer King as Director of Consumer Privacy, Center for Internet and Society

Stanford Law School today announced the appointment of Dr. Jennifer King as Director of Consumer Privacy at the Center for Internet and Society (CIS). Dr. King will lead the center’s research efforts in consumer privacy. Dr. King joins Albert Gidari, Consulting Director of Privacy, who focuses on government surveillance and enforcement, cross border data issues, and electronic surveillance.

Taking Information Down from Source Websites Under Data Protection Law

Canada's Office of the Privacy Commissioner has concluded that an existing law, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA), gives individuals legal power to make individual websites take down information. This goes well beyond the rights recognized by the European Court of Justice in its “right to be forgotten” case, and raises the following important questions

A Right to Be Forgotten in Canada?

Should Canada adopt its own version of the “right to be forgotten”? The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) recently concluded, in a Draft Position Paper, that such a right actually exists already. According to the OPC, Canada’s Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) gives individuals legal power to make search engines like Google de-list search results about them, and to make individual websites take down information. In a Comment filed last week, I argued that this interpretation of PIPEDA will create far more problems than it solves.

Understanding & Improving Privacy "Audits" under FTC Orders

This new white paper, entitled “Understanding and Improving Privacy ‘Audits’ under FTC Orders,” carefully parses the third-party audits that Google and Facebook are required to conduct under their 2012 Federal Trade Commission consent orders.  Using only publicly available documents, the article contrasts the FTC’s high expectations for the audits with what the FTC actually received (as released to the public in redacted form). 

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