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Challenging cybersecurity as the reason to oppose the consumer Right to Repair

The so-called 'Right to Repair' is a consumer grassroots initiative that seeks to allow technology users and consumers the ability to repair, modify, or seek third-party servicing of their electronic devices in a world where the maker of those devices prefers, if not requires, customers to use only their 'authorized' services or stores/facilities. Read more about Challenging cybersecurity as the reason to oppose the consumer Right to Repair

“Tool Without A Handle: Spirituality, Virtue, and Technology Ethics - Part 2”

This post visits some additional concepts of virtue found in Christian teaching supplementing concepts from other traditions such as Aristotle (natural law tradition), Buddhism, and Confucianism, namely:

Consumer preferences are not always the same as consumer interests;
Winning is not the most important thing;
Solitude matters as much as engagement;

If the only values applied to Internet services are to “give people what they want,” “win followers and ads at all costs,” and “maximize reach and engagement” we will be vastly underequipped to deal with the problems those services – and the people who use them - would create, both presently and yet to come. And we will fail to respond to our present moment, one characterized by trauma, wounding, and loss that should indeed motivate us to pursue new thinking and new approaches. Read more about “Tool Without A Handle: Spirituality, Virtue, and Technology Ethics - Part 2”

New Role at Stanford

"Some personal news," as they say: After five wonderful years at CIS, starting tomorrow (December 1) I'll be transitioning into a new role as a Research Scholar at the Stanford Internet Observatory. I'll continue to be a CIS affiliate (with blogging rights on this blog!), and my work will continue to focus on encryption, surveillance, and cybersecurity issues. 2021 is poised to be a consequential year for encryption policy in the U.S. Read more about New Role at Stanford

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