Publications

Men, Fathers, and Work-Family Balance

Author(s): 
Emily Baxter
Publication Date: 
February 4, 2015
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

University of Oregon Sociologist Scott Coltrane and colleagues correctly stated that there is a “mismatch between the workplace and workforce” in the United States today. While about half of American families in the 1970s had a breadwinning father and a homemaking mother, only about one-third of families today fit that description. Dual-earner couples have become the norm in American society, thanks to women’s expanded workforce participation; both partners work in 59.1 percent of married couples with children, and 68.2 percent of single mothers are also employed outside the home. Read more » about Men, Fathers, and Work-Family Balance

The Decision That Could Finally Kill the Revenge-Porn Business

Author(s): 
Danielle Citron
Woodrow Hartzog
Publication Date: 
February 3, 2015
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Co-authored by Danielle Citron and Woodrow Hartzog.

Revenge-pornography websites are a reminder that preying on the vulnerable has long been big business. And while various laws protect people against scam artists, extortionists, manipulators, and other unscrupulous enterprises, the law has not been able to keep up with all malicious businesses. Read more » about The Decision That Could Finally Kill the Revenge-Porn Business

Intellectual Privacy: Rethinking Civil Liberties in the Digital Age

Author(s): 
Neil Richards
Publication Date: 
January 22, 2015
Publication Type: 
Academic Writing

Abstract:

Most people believe that privacy and free speech are always at odds. People all over the world have struggled with how to reconcile the problems of media gossip with our commitment to free and open public debate for over a century. The rise of the Internet has made this problem more urgent. We live in an age of corporate and government surveillance of our lives. And our free speech culture has created an anything-goes environment on the web, where offensive and hurtful speech about others is rife. Read more » about Intellectual Privacy: Rethinking Civil Liberties in the Digital Age

New Republican Bill Is Network Neutrality in Name Only

Author(s): 
Barbara van Schewick
Morgan Weiland
Publication Date: 
January 20, 2015
Publication Type: 
Academic Writing

After a year of debates and a month before the Federal Communication Commission’s (FCC’s) rulemaking on network neutrality, the GOP has finally joined the party. Through a draft bill released late last week, congressional Republicans have taken a step in the direction of supporting network neutrality. That’s a good thing, and moves them closer to the existing consensus. Roughly four million Americans submitted comments to the FCC calling for real network neutrality rules over the past year, and polls show that both Republicans and Democrats overwhelmingly support a ban on fast lanes. Read more » about New Republican Bill Is Network Neutrality in Name Only

Network Neutrality and Quality of Service: What a Nondiscrimination Rule Should Look Like

Author(s): 
Barbara van Schewick
Publication Date: 
January 16, 2015
Publication Type: 
Academic Writing

Over the past ten years, the debate over “network neutrality” has remained one of the central debates in Internet policy. Governments all over the world have been investigating whether legislative or regulatory action is needed to limit the ability of providers of Internet access service to interfere with the applications, content, and services on their networks. Read more » about Network Neutrality and Quality of Service: What a Nondiscrimination Rule Should Look Like

Will the FCC ruin the Internet?

Author(s): 
Barbara van Schewick
Publication Date: 
November 7, 2014
Publication Type: 
Other Writing
The results of the midterm election confirm Americans' widespread discontent with Washington gridlock on a range of issues.
 
In the last few months, millions of people contacted the White House, Congress and federal agencies to demand action on one of those issues -- protecting a free and open Internet.
 

Does the FCC really not get it about the Internet?

Author(s): 
Brett Frischmann
Publication Date: 
October 31, 2014
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The key to an open Internet is nondiscrimination and in particular, a prohibition on discrimination or prioritization based on the identity of the user (sender/receiver) or use (application/content). I explain why at length in my book, Infrastructure: The Social Value of Shared Resources (2012). Read more » about Does the FCC really not get it about the Internet?

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