Publications

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The U.K. has voted for Brexit. Here’s what happens next.

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
June 24, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

After a bitter referendum campaign, the United Kingdom has voted for Brexit, making the decision to leave the European Union. This is the first time that the E.U. has lost a member and will have dramatic consequences for European politics. Although the United Kingdom has sometimes been an uncomfortable member of the E.U., it has played a crucial role, for example in helping to create a shared market across Europe and in pushing for the enlargement of the E.U. to include Eastern European countries after the end of the Cold War.

The Obama administration wanted to open up government to citizen input. Why hasn’t it worked?

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
June 20, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Beth Simone Noveck is the Jerry Hultin Global Network Professor at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering. Her new book, “Smart Citizens, Smarter State: The Technologies of Expertise and the Future of Governing,” was published by Harvard University Press. I asked her five questions by email about the book’s major arguments.

America’s founders hated general warrants. So why has the government resurrected them?

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
June 14, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Laura Donohue is a professor of law at Georgetown University  and was recently appointed as a public advocate to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. She is also the author of a new book published by Oxford University Press, “The Future of Foreign Intelligence: Privacy and Surveillance in a Digital Age.” I asked her some questions about the argument of her book.

A First Amendment For Social Platforms

Author(s): 
Nabiha Syed
Publication Date: 
June 2, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The great 21st-century platforms — Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Snapchat, and the rest — have this year found themselves in the middle of the speech wars. Twitter is struggling to contain vile trolling and harassment, and Facebook has gotten scalded on the little toe it dipped into curating journalism.

The U.S. wants to maintain cross-border data flows. That may be tough.

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
June 2, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

"Karen Kornbluh, the former U.S. ambassador to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), has a new cyber brief making the case for open cross-border data flows at the Council on Foreign Relations website (full disclosure: I authored an earlier brief in this series). Kornbluh argues that foreign jurisdictions pose an increasing threat to open flows of data across networks such as the Internet.

It’s important for SF to get body-camera rules for police right

Author(s): 
Catherine Crump
Publication Date: 
June 1, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

After months of consideration, the San Francisco Police Commission approved rules Wednesday for use of the latest innovation sweeping law enforcement nationwide — police body-worn cameras. Toney Chaplin, San Francisco’s acting police chief, had announced on his first full day in the job last month that deploying body cameras was his top priority.

Spying on Muslims is bad policy

Author(s): 
Brian Nussbaum
Publication Date: 
May 23, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

During the presidential primary, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz suggested increased surveillance and policing of Muslim neighborhoods in the United States. This suggestion has rightly provoked the ire of many people across the political spectrum. Even more than being out of step with American values, these strategies are counterproductive to good counterterrorism policy.

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