Publications

Reconciling Copyright with Cumulative Creativity: The Third Paradigm

Author(s): 
Giancarlo Frosio
Publication Date: 
June 1, 2018
Publication Type: 
Book
Reconciling Copyright with Cumulative Creativity: The Third Paradigm examines the long history of creativity, from cave art to digital remix, in order to demonstrate a consistent disparity between the traditional cumulative mechanics of creativity and modern copyright policies. 
 

Government Hacking Makes Everyone Less Safe

Author(s): 
Jennifer Granick
Publication Date: 
September 13, 2018
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Last week, the Justice Department filed criminal charges against a North Korean operative for a malware attack that endangered hospital systems and crippled the computers of businesses, governments, and individuals around the world. Americans might be surprised to learn that the software used for this 2017 attack — known as “WannaCry” — was based on a hacking tool created by the U.S. government itself.

Comments on the Australian Assistance and Access Bill 2018

Author(s): 
Riana Pfefferkorn
Publication Date: 
September 9, 2018
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Comments submitted to the Australian Government's Department of Home Affairs on its exposure draft of the Assistance and Access Bill 2018.

Security Risks of Government Hacking

Author(s): 
Riana Pfefferkorn
Publication Date: 
September 5, 2018
Publication Type: 
White Paper / Report

Abstract: As the use of encryption and other privacy-enhancing technologies has increased, government officials in the United States have sought ways to ensure law enforcement’s capability to access communications and other data in plaintext. One of those methods is government hacking, also called “equipment interference.” Government hacking allows investigators to exploit hardware and software vulnerabilities to gain remote access to target computers.

Online labor markets may look competitive. They aren’t.

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
August 2, 2018
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

People often think that online markets are far more efficient and competitive than traditional ones. This may not be so. In a new National Bureau of Economic Research paper, Arindrajit Dube, Jeff Jacobs, Suresh Naidu and Siddharth Suri find that a highly important online labor market is characterized by power relations so that workers lose out, and the people and organizations who hire them enjoy market power. I asked Suresh Naidu what this research means.

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