The Center for Internet and Society strives to improve both technology and law, encouraging decision makers to design both as a means to further democratic values.

  • Aguiar v. Webb

    We defended a documentary filmmaker who was sued for copyright infringement for clips appearing in his documentary about Count Dante, an enigmatic, Chicago martial arts legend.

  • Associated Press v. Meltwater

    Meltwater News ("Meltwater") is a search engine and research tool that allows users to search for and obtain information about news items that have been made publicly available on the Internet.

  • Bouchat v. Baltimore Ravens and NFL, et al.

    We filed an amicus brief in the Fourth Circuit in support of the Baltimore Ravens and the NFL urging the Fourth Circuit to grant rehearing or rehearing en banc, after a divided panel ruled that the Raven’s incidental use of a copyrighted logo in historical game films was not a fair use.

  • Brave New Films v. Savage

    After Original Talk Radio Network, the nationwide distributor of Michael Savage’s radio show, issued a takedown notice against a video critical of Savage’s portrayal of Muslims, we filed a lawsuit that convinced the company to withdraw its objections to our client’s film.

  • Brave New Films v. Viacom

    After Viacom issued a takedown notice against a parody of the Colbert Report, we filed a lawsuit that convinced Viacom to withdraw its objections.

  • Cariou v. Prince

    We filed an amicus brief in the Second Circuit on behalf of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts urging the appeals court to reverse a district court decision that ignored established fair use principles that many artists rely upon in creating their work.

  • Comcast Corporation v. Federal Communications Commission

    Comcast Corp. v. FCC is a 2010 United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia case holding that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) does not have ancillary jurisdiction over Comcast’s Internet service under the language of the Communications Act of 1934.

  • Fairey v. The Associated Press

    We represented visual artist Shepard Fairey in connection with the AP’s claim that his iconic “Hope” poster in support of President Obama’s campaign infringes the AP’s copyrights.

  • Federal Communications Commission Preserving the Open Internet Proceeding

    In 2005, on the same day the FCC re-classified DSL service and effectively reduced the regulatory obligations of DSL providers, the FCC announced its unanimous view that consumers are entitled to certain rights and expectations with respect to their broadband service, including the right to:

  • Federal Communications Commission Proceeding Regarding Comcast’s Blocking of BitTorrent

  • Gaylord v. U.S. Postal Service

    We filed an amicus brief in the Federal Circuit on behalf of the Warhol Foundation and Warhol Museum, contemporary artists and law professors in support of the U.S. Postal Service, urging affirmance of the district court’s finding of fair use.

  • Golan v. Holder

    The FUP filed this suit on behalf of a University of Denver conductor and others, challenging Congress’s restoration of copyright to works that had entered the public domain.

  • Kahle v. Gonzales

    In this case, two archives challenged statutes that extended copyright terms unconditionally—the Copyright Renewal Act and the Copyright Term Extension Act (CTEA)—as unconstitutional under Copyright Clause and the First Amendment.

  • Lang v. Morris

    Sarah Morris is a well-known multimedia artist and filmmaker. In 2007, she debuted her "Origami" series, 24 paintings in which she reworked, redesigned, and reshaped origami crease patterns on canvas.

  • Lennon v. Premise Media

    Yoko Ono and EMI sued a documentary filmmaker for using a short clip from the John Lennon song “Imagine” as part of a critique of the lyrics of the song.  We defended the filmmaker and successfully argued that the use of the copyrighted song was fair use.

  • Murphy v. Millennium Radio Group, LLC, Craig Carton and Ray Rossi

    We filed an amicus brief in the Third Circuit on behalf of Brave New Films urging affirmance of the district court’s finding of fair use and rejection of plaintiff’s DMCA claims.

  • Rowling v. RDR Books

    We defended the publisher of the Harry Potter Lexicon against suit from J.K. Rowling and Warner Brothers.

  • Salinger v. Colting, et al.

    We filed an amicus brief on behalf of a group of library associations and others asking the Second Circuit to reverse a lower court’s injunction of the publication of 60 Years Later: Coming through the Rye an unauthorized story based on J.D. Salinger’s in Catcher In The Rye.

  • Shloss v. Estate of Joyce

    After the Estate of James Joyce refused to allow a scholar to quote Joyce in her book, we successfully defended her right under the fair use doctrine to use the quotes she needed to illustrate her scholarship.  After we prevailed in the case, the Estate paid $240,000 of our client’s legal fees.

  • Sony v. Tenenbaum

    We filed an amicus brief on behalf of the Electronic Frontier Foundation asking the First Circuit to affirm the district court’s reduced damages award in Sony v. Tenenbaum, a file-sharing case in which a jury originally ordered a college student to pay $675,000 for infringing copyright in 30 songs.