Academic Writing

The Inconsequential Choice-Of-Law Question Posed By Jesner V. Arab Bank

Author(s): 
Beth Van Schaack
Publication Date: 
June 16, 2018
Publication Type: 
Academic Writing

Abstract

In Jesner v. Arab Bank, the United States (U.S.) Supreme Court has taken up the question of whether victims of human rights abuses can sue corporations and other legal entities for violations of the law of nations under the Alien Tort Statute (ATS).

Download available at ILSA Journal of International & Comparative Law. 

Internet Platforms: Observations on Speech, Danger, and Money

Author(s): 
Daphne Keller
Publication Date: 
June 13, 2018
Publication Type: 
Academic Writing

Policymakers increasingly ask Internet platforms like Facebook to “take responsibility” for material posted by their users. Mark Zuckerberg and other tech leaders seem willing to do so. That is in part a good development. Platforms are uniquely positioned to reduce harmful content online. But deputizing them to police users’ speech in the modern public square can also have serious unintended consequences. This piece reviews existing laws and current pressures to expand intermediaries’ liability for user-generated content.

Why Keep a Dog and Bark Yourself? From Intermediary Liability to Responsibility

Author(s): 
Giancarlo Frosio
Publication Date: 
November 3, 2017
Publication Type: 
Academic Writing
Since the enactment of the first safe harbours and liability exemptions for online intermediaries, market conditions have radically changed. Originally, intermediary liability exemptions were introduced to promote an emerging Internet market. Do safe harbours for online intermediaries still serve innovation? Should they be limited or expanded? These critical questions—often tainted by protectionist concerns—define the present intermediary liability conundrum.

To Filter or Not to Filter? That is the Question in EU Copyright Reform

Author(s): 
Giancarlo Frosio
Publication Date: 
October 25, 2017
Publication Type: 
Academic Writing
This article discusses the proposed introduction in EU law of an obligation for hosting providers to conclude licencing agreements with copyright holders and ensure their functioning by taking effective technological measures—such as content id technologies—to prevent copyright infringement on online platforms.

Trusting Big Data Research

Author(s): 
Neil Richards
Woodrow Hartzog
Publication Date: 
October 24, 2017
Publication Type: 
Academic Writing

ABSTRACT

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