Academic Writing

Comments Pertaining to Internet Users' Expression and Information Rights

Author(s): 
Daphne Keller
Publication Date: 
April 27, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing
I write as the Director of Intermediary Liability at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. My work there focuses closely on the “Right to Be Forgotten” or “Right to Be De-Listed” under EU data protection law, and under the GDPR in particular. I previously served as Associate General Counsel for Google. In that capacity I testified as a representative to the Leveson Inquiry and later traveled with company’s Advisory Council on the Right to Be Forgotten.
 

The three ‘B's’ of cybersecurity for small businesses

Author(s): 
Scott Shackelford
Publication Date: 
April 17, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Large-scale cyberattacks with eye-watering statistics, like the breach of a billion Yahoo accounts in 2016, grab most of the headlines. But what often gets lost in the noise is how often small and medium-sized organizations find themselves under attack.

Good cop cameras, bad rules: The NYPD's body-cam guidelines need fixing

Author(s): 
Harlan Yu
Publication Date: 
April 13, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Last summer, the NYPD asked New Yorkers what rules should apply to the body-worn cameras that police will soon begin wearing. The response was overwhelming: More than 25,000 people responded to the department’s survey. The community asked for policies that would make the camera program more transparent, so that the footage can make cops more accountable to the people.

Last week, the NYPD announced its new body-worn camera policy. Turns out, the NYPD isn’t actually that interested in what the public thinks.

Hungary’s government wants to shut down its most prominent university. That may be backfiring.

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
April 10, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

When Hungary’s government passed a law last week which was effectively intended to shut down Budapest’s Central European University, it surely anticipated that there would be a backlash. It probably did not anticipate mass demonstrations, or senior European politicians threatening to suspend Hungary’s membership of the European Union. Here is how Hungary’s government has gotten into this mess.

Hungary’s leader doesn’t like liberal democracy

Important New Bipartisan Bill To Advance Accountability for International Crimes in Syria

Author(s): 
Beth Van Schaack
Publication Date: 
April 10, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Following on the heels of last week’s chemical weapon attack in Syria, Senators Marco Rubio (R-FL), Ben Cardin (D-MD), Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), Bob Corker (R-TN), Bob Menendez (D-NJ), and Todd Young (R-IN) have introduced the Syria War Crimes Accountability Act of 2017, which authorizes the United States to provide technical and other forms of assistance to investigations and other credible transitional justice efforts, including a potential hybrid tribunal.

Here's How Tesla Solves A Self-Driving Crash Dilemma

Author(s): 
Patrick Lin
Publication Date: 
April 5, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

With very rare exceptions, automakers are famously coy about crash dilemmas.  They don’t want to answer questions about how their self-driving cars would respond to weird, no-win emergencies.  This is understandable, since any answer can be criticized—there’s no obvious solution to a true dilemma, so why play that losing game?

Reforming Surveillance In the Age of Donald Trump

Author(s): 
Jennifer Granick
Publication Date: 
March 25, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

On Wednesday, the Republican chair of the House Intelligence Committee, Devin Nunes (R-CA), gave a press conference in which he reported that Trump transition team members’ communications were intercepted by US intelligence agencies through “incidental collection.” This follows on Nunes’ concerns, after Michael Flynn stepped down following intelligence reports that he had talked to the Russian ambassador.

Supreme Court Says Patent Trolls Can Wait A While Before Suing

Author(s): 
Daniel Nazer
Publication Date: 
March 22, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

In a ruling this week that will cheer up patent trolls, the Supreme Court said patent owners can lie in wait for years before suing. This will allow trolls to sit around while others independently develop and build technology. The troll can then jump out from under the bridge and demand payment for work it had nothing to do with.

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