Academic Writing

Only Title II will ensure fairness among ISPs

Author(s): 
Barbara van Schewick
Publication Date: 
September 16, 2014
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Last Wednesday, more than 300,000 people contacted the White House and their representatives in Congress on a day of action calling for a free and open Internet. More than 1.4 million people have submitted comments to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on the need for strong network neutrality rules. Read more » about Only Title II will ensure fairness among ISPs

More Than 3 Million Told the FCC What They Think About Net Neutrality. Why Hasn't Obama?

Author(s): 
Marvin Ammori
Publication Date: 
September 16, 2014
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The FCC has received more than 3 million comments on Commissioner Tom Wheeler’s controversial plan to rethink net neutrality. If the last couple of million comments are anything like the first 1.1 million, 99 percent of commenters were strongly in favor of protecting net neutrality. Read more » about More Than 3 Million Told the FCC What They Think About Net Neutrality. Why Hasn't Obama?

Is the Internet about to get sloooooow?

Author(s): 
Barbara van Schewick
Publication Date: 
September 10, 2014
Publication Type: 
Other Writing
On Wednesday, millions of Americans visiting their favorite websites will encounter the same dreaded image: the spinning wheel of death. This is the symbol of the great "Internet Slowdown" -- a coordinated day of action among hundreds of organizers and some of the world's largest tech firms, including Netflix, Twitter, Etsy, Kickstarter, Mozilla, Foursquare, Reddit, and WordPress. Together they are showing the American public what most of the Internet would look like in a world without "net neutrality." In a word: slow.
 

Keep Nude Photos offline? Here's a Better Idea

Author(s): 
Woodrow Hartzog
Publication Date: 
September 4, 2014
Publication Type: 
Other Writing
"If you want to keep something private, keep it offline."
 
This has been a popular reaction to stories about the targeted attack on celebrities' cloud storage accounts that resulted in the publication of intimate photos. There's something intuitive in this way of thinking. After all, folks can't wrongfully access data that doesn't exist. But it's simplistic logic, and misguided when viewed as the ethic that should guide digital age conduct.
 

Two Reasons Why Extreme Social Surveillance Doesn't Replace Privacy

Author(s): 
Woodrow Hartzog
Publication Date: 
September 1, 2014
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

More than a few people maintain that if we all knew everything about each other, the world would be a better place. The total transparency argument takes many forms, and shades of it can be seen in the surveillance policy and discourse that holds that “more information is always better than less information,” and information asymmetries should always be remedied by more disclosure and surveillance, not less.

Read the full article. Read more » about Two Reasons Why Extreme Social Surveillance Doesn't Replace Privacy

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