Academic Writing

Too Good to Be True?

Author(s): 
Riana Pfefferkorn
Publication Date: 
September 10, 2019
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The client shows his lawyer a video he says he took on his cell phone. It shows the defendant saying things that, if seen by the jury, will be a slam dunk for the client’s case. The attorney includes the video in her list of evidence for trial, but the defendant’s lawyers move to strike. They claim it’s a fake. What’s the plaintiff’s lawyer—and the judge—to do?

Welcome to trial practice in the new world of "deepfake" videos.

The FTC Can Rise to the Privacy Challenge, but Not Without Help From Congress

Author(s): 
Woodrow Hartzog
Publication Date: 
August 9, 2019
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Editor's note: This piece originally appeared on TechTank.

Facebook’s recent settlement with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has reignited debate over whether the agency is up to the task of protecting privacy. Many people, including some skeptics of the FTC’s ability to rein in Silicon Valley, lauded the settlement, or at least parts of it.

Further Submission to PJCIS Regarding Assistance and Access Act

Author(s): 
Riana Pfefferkorn
Publication Date: 
June 14, 2019
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Submission to Australia's Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security (PJCIS) regarding its review of the Assistance and Access Act that had passed into law in early December 2018.

Build Your Own Intermediary Liability Law: A Kit for Policy Wonks of All Ages

Author(s): 
Daphne Keller
Publication Date: 
June 11, 2019
Publication Type: 
Other Writing
In recent years, lawmakers around the world have proposed a lot of new intermediary liability (IL) laws. Many have been miscalibrated – risking serious collateral damage without necessarily using the best means to advance lawmakers’ goals. That shouldn’t be a surprise. IL isn’t like tax law or farm subsidies. Lawmakers, particularly in the United States, haven’t thought much about IL in decades.

Want to See My Genes? Get a Warrant

Author(s): 
Elizabeth Joh
Publication Date: 
June 11, 2019
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Someone broke into a church in Centerville, Utah, last November and attacked the organist who was practicing there. In March, after a conventional investigation came up empty, a police detective turned to forensic consultants at Parabon NanoLabs. Using the publicly accessible website GEDmatch, the consultants found a likely distant genetic relative of the suspect, whose blood sample had been found near the church’s broken window.

Pages