Press

CIS in the news.

  • Kamala Harris’ Crusade Against ‘Revenge Porn’

    Date published: 
    February 1, 2019

    "“She was in the heart of Silicon Valley and she didn’t take no nonsense,” says Danielle Citron, the law professor. “I think her preference is, ‘It’s good for business, but let’s figure out how it’s good for society.’ I don’t think she’s cowed by anybody.”"

  • Oral Arguments to Begin in Major Net Neutrality Case

    Date published: 
    February 1, 2019

    "A federal appeals court in Washington D.C. will hear arguments Friday in a challenge to the Federal Communications Commission's 2017 decision to end net neutrality. The challengers, a coalition of tech companies and digital rights advocates, are asking the court to reinstate Obama-era rules that barred internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon from blocking or prioritizing internet traffic. The FCC defends the rollback as encouraging innovation and easing unnecessary regulatory burdens.

  • San Francisco Could Be First to Ban Facial Recognition Tech

    Date published: 
    January 31, 2019

    "“This is the first piece of legislation that I’ve seen that really takes facial recognition technology as seriously as it is warranted and treats it as uniquely dangerous,” says Woodrow Hartzog, professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University."

  • Lawmakers plunge into "deepfake" war

    Date published: 
    January 31, 2019

    "Lawmakers don't get many chances to get this right, says Citron. "You gotta write this correctly." One or two over-broad or ineffective bills and an appetite for a deepfakes law might turn into backlash.

  • Despite 'transparency' claims, Facebook stops watchdogs from monitoring ads

    Date published: 
    January 30, 2019

    "The propublica tool, much like ours, was aimed to provide users with valuable information about political ads to help shed more light on a process that has historically been very secretive," Marshall Erwin, Mozilla's head of trust and security, told Mashable over email. "Major tech companies need to provide more transparency into political advertising, and support researchers and other organizations, like Mozilla, working in good faith to strengthen our democratic processes.""

  • How to Spot Manipulative 'Dark Patterns' Online

    Date published: 
    January 30, 2019

    "Woodrow Hartzog, a Northeastern University professor of law and computer science, examines dark patterns in his book "Privacy’s Blueprint" (Harvard University Press, 2018). “In the aggregate,” he says, the practice “amounts to this collective machine that is trying to extract every ounce of data and value from us.""

  • Facebook Hires Up Three of Its Biggest Privacy Critics

    Date published: 
    January 30, 2019

    "Jen King, director of consumer privacy at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society, thinks it's a sign Facebook may be ready to actually take privacy seriously. "It's possible that Facebook has finally gotten the memo and is really trying to make change," King told WIRED.

  • How Can Patients Make Money Off Their Medical Data?

    Date published: 
    January 29, 2019

    "“Not everything works better when we put dollar (or in the case of data, cent) figures on it,” Neil M. Richards, a law professor at Washington University in St. Louis, said in a Jan. 25 email.

    “Rather than making sure that data brokers pay as they go or provide micro-payments to people whose data they use at some market rate that is likely under-compensatory, we should make sure data brokers can be trusted to act in the public interest,” said Richards, who focuses on genomic science and the law and ethics of human information management."

  • Google Maps v Apple Maps - Which app is truly the best for getting around?

    Date published: 
    January 28, 2019

    "In response to the AP report, Jonathan Mayer, a Princeton computer scientist, said: “If you're going to allow users to turn off something called ‘location history’, then all the places where you maintain location history should be turned off.

    “That seems like a pretty straightforward position to have.”"

  • Internet’s gatekeepers

    Date published: 
    January 27, 2019

    "The Supreme Court appropriately understood the importance of the internet to the way politics and free expression occur right now,” says Neil Richards, a professor at Washington University Law School, who specialises in First Amendment law.

  • Michigan leans on manufacturing history in bid to become a hub for autonomous vehicles

    Date published: 
    January 27, 2019

    "“I think a lot of policymakers [here] recognize that they don’t just want to be manufacturers [anymore],” University of South Carolina law professor Bryant Walker Smith, who studies autonomous vehicles, told VentureBeat. “Michigan’s done a better job than other states in really thinking through research and development as part of a strategy.”"

  • Court Overturns Decision in Illinois’ Landmark Biometric Privacy Case

    Date published: 
    January 25, 2019

    "Woodrow Hartzog, professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University, agreed, noting the opinion could impact future surveillance and data rules in the U.S.

    “Many have argued for years that privacy harms extend far beyond things like identity theft and extreme mental anguish,” Hartzog added. “This case recognizes that people are harmed when companies interfere with people’s ability to maintain their biometric privacy.”"

  • Modern technology, including cameras and cellphones, helped to save Olivia Ambrose

    Date published: 
    January 24, 2019

    "“The idea of wiring up a city and placing cameras on every corner in the hope you’re going to proactively respond to crime, you’re not going to see that be effective on a wide scale,” said Jennifer King, director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

    The Ambrose investigation, King said, “is the best case of what we want to see public surveillance do. It was there as a retrospective investigative tool.”"

  • Waymo to put factory for autonomous vehicles in Michigan

    Date published: 
    January 24, 2019

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina law professor who studies autonomous vehicles, said the announcement shows that Waymo, which was spun off from Google and is part of parent company Alphabet, has plans to integrate itself into the existing auto industry.

    “You can’t reinvent everything. Coming to Michigan in some ways is your complete recognition of that,” Smith said. “Michigan is where you go in the United States to be fully immersed in automotive culture and industry.”"

  • iSchools 2019 Dissertation Award results announced: Dr. Maia Jacobs is winner, Dr. Jennifer King runner-up

    Date published: 
    January 18, 2019

    The iSchools are pleased to announce that Dr. Maia Jacobs of the Georgia Tech iSchool has been named winner of the 2019 iSchools Doctoral Dissertation Award. The runner up is Dr. Jennifer King of the UC Berkeley iSchool. The iSchools organization congratulates both honorees on their achievement. The pair will be recognized at the upcoming iConference 2019 in Washington DC.

  • The Bold Robocar Roaming Las Vegas Without a Human Backup

    Date published: 
    January 16, 2019

    "“Traditional wisdom was companies like Google, Waymo, or Toyota, or GM, or even Uber are going to be really responsible, because if something bad happens it will affect their entire business,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law who studies automated vehicle policy. “I would like to see a little more sharing by all companies about their approach, other than just the superficial ‘trust us.’”"

  • Fake Porn Videos Are Terrorizing Women. Do We Need a Law to Stop Them?

    Date published: 
    January 15, 2019

    "This raises the question of whether Congress could draft a law narrow enough to help victims of deepfakes without such unintended consequences. As a cautionary tale, Annemarie Bridy, a law professor at the University of Idaho, points to the misuse of the copyright takedown system in which companies and individuals have acted in bad faith to remove legitimate criticism and other legal content.

    Still, given what’s at stake with pornographic deep fake videos, Bridy says, it could be worth drafting a new law.

  • Pedestrians and e-scooters are clashing in the struggle for sidewalk space

    Date published: 
    January 11, 2019

    "In some situations, multibillion-dollar scooter companies may be held liable, but in others, reckless scooter riders, local governments or their insurers could be forced to compensate injured pedestrians, according to Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who is teaching a technology law class next semester exploring ­e-scooter regulation.

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