Press

CIS in the news.

  • Tackling the ‘Deep Fake,’ House Grasps for Solution to Doctored Videos

    Date published: 
    June 13, 2019

    "Sharing Ayyub’s story with the committee, University of Maryland law professor Danielle Citron noted that the journalist awoke to find her  face had been superimposed on the body of a woman in porno in April 2018, less than 24 hours after an appearance on BBC and Al Jazeera in which she condemned Indian religious leaders who had advocated on behalf of defendants involved in an 8-year-old’s gang rape and murder.

  • Schiff Calls ‘Deepfakes’ a Nightmarish Threat to 2020 Elections

    Date published: 
    June 13, 2019

    "The law currently exempts online platforms such as Facebook for most content its users post, but Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland who testified, said the immunity should be preserved only for those that employ "reasonable content moderation practices."

    "There are some sites that literally traffic in abuse, that encourage illegality, but they should not enjoy immunity from liability," Citron said, adding that she has advised Facebook and Twitter Inc. as best practices have emerged in recent years."

  • After manipulated Zuckerberg, Pelosi videos, lawmakers grasp for ‘deepfake’ answers

    Date published: 
    June 13, 2019

    "“There are a few phenomena that come together that make deepfakes particularly troubling when they’re provocative and destructive,” Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland who has written about the dangers of deepfakes, told the House Intelligence Committee. “The first is that we know that as human beings, video and audio is so visceral, we tend to believe what our eyes and ears are telling us.”"

  • EFF asks for DOJ efforts to break Facebook encryption to be made public

    Date published: 
    June 13, 2019

    "The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has landed in appeals court to see through a case which hopes to expose the US government's anti-encryption tactics.

    On Wednesday, the civil rights group asked the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit to unseal documents relating to a ruling made by a judge to prevent the US Department of Justice (DoJ) from forcing Facebook to purposely break Facebook Messenger encryption protocols.

  • House holds hearing on "deepfakes" and artificial intelligence amid national security concerns

    Date published: 
    June 13, 2019

    "Danielle Citron, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, testified that there's no finite way to stop deepfakes from spreading, but said a combination of "law, markets and societal resiliences" are necessary to get resolution. 

    "But law has a modest role to play," Citron conceded. She explained that victims in civil claims can sue for defamation or emotional distress from the videos, but added that it's "incredibly expensive to sue and criminal law offers too few levers for us to push."

  • We Read 150 Privacy Policies. They Were an Incomprehensible Disaster.

    Date published: 
    June 12, 2019

    "“You’re confused into thinking these are there to inform users, as opposed to protect companies,” said Albert Gidari, the consulting director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

    According to Jen King, the director of consumer privacy at the Center for Internet and Society, this doesn’t mean we should throw out privacy policies entirely — we just need a fresh start.

  • Big Tech's timid deepfake defense

    Date published: 
    June 12, 2019

    ""A deepfake could cause a riot; it could tip an election; it could crash an IPO. And if it goes viral, [social media companies] are responsible," says Danielle Citron, a UMD law professor who has written extensively about deepfakes."

  • This viral Schwarzenegger deepfake isn't just entertaining. It's a warning.

    Date published: 
    June 12, 2019

    "Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and author of “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace,” is scheduled to testify before the House Intel Committee’s deepfake panel to talk about potential ways — including legislation — to stop deepfakes that could affect elections, personal lives and businesses.

  • Apple Pledges Privacy, Beefs Up Security

    Date published: 
    June 12, 2019

    ""I think there is a lot of pressure on the data companies from a lot of different directions," says Omer Tene, vice president and chief knowledge officer at the International Association of Privacy Professionals. "Apple will continue to be the most aggressive proponent of privacy as it provides them a competitive advantage."

    Yet, whether technology companies that provide services for free can wean themselves off of data remains to be seen, the EFF's Hoffman-Andrews says.

  • Alexandria rape suspect challenging DNA search used to crack case

    Date published: 
    June 10, 2019

    "Elizabeth E. Joh, who teaches policing and technology at the University of California at Davis School of Law, said she thinks legislation is needed to establish limits to law enforcement’s use of DNA.

    “There’s very little in the way of rules in terms of what’s permitted and what isn’t,” she said. “It’s still relatively new, and the kind of cases that have thus far been solved are the kinds of cases I think most people want to have solved. But that doesn’t answer the question of what the limits should be on what the government can do.”"

  • Ring Is Using Its Customers’ Doorbell Camera Video For Ads. It Says It's Allowed To.

    Date published: 
    June 7, 2019

    "Jennifer King, director of consumer privacy at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, called Ring’s practice of asking for user consent to pass imagery on to law enforcement and then using that footage for its own ads “shady.”

    “I don’t know if it’s illegal, but that seems like a violation of expectations,” she said. “There’s a difference between public service and profiteering.”"

  • Russia's Yandex Reportedly Ordered By FSB To Hand Over Encryption Keys

    Date published: 
    June 4, 2019

    "“What the Russian government aims to do is take online services out of the loop -- eliminating an important backstop for human rights and the rule of law. The Russian government's demand also poses a cybersecurity risk for all users of these online services, regardless of whether they're the target of surveillance,’’ Mayer told RFE/RL.""

  • Austria’s bid to end online anonymity triggers crackdown fears

    Date published: 
    June 2, 2019

    "People would be allowed to use pseudonyms when posting online, but platforms could be forced to hand out the users’ private information to third parties, including private persons, seeking prosecution for defamation or other crimes.

    “The chilling effect for freedom of speech is real,” said Thomas Lohninger."

  • Why Net Neutrality Advocates Remain Optimistic

    Date published: 
    June 1, 2019

    "Eshoo and her copanelists, Federal Communications Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, Reddit CEO Steven Huffman, and Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick, remained doggedly optimistic about the future of net neutrality in the United States."

  • Privacy and Civil Liberties Board Considers Three Ways for Congress to Address Controversial Surveillance Program

    Date published: 
    June 1, 2019

    "The NSA is allowed to collect records for individuals up to two times removed from targets, creating exponential growth in the total number of records. Without this “two hops” rule, the effectiveness of the program would be “greatly diminished,” according to Jonathan Mayer, a professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University."

  • The Week in Tech: Disinformation’s Huge Inaction Problem

    Date published: 
    May 31, 2019

    "“What’s not so clear yet is whether G.D.P.R. has had an effect on privacy and on corporate data practices,” said Omer Tene, vice president and chief knowledge officer at the International Association of Privacy Professionals. “Has the underlying business model of the internet changed? Is consumer privacy better? I think those questions are very much still open.”"

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