Press

CIS in the news.

  • How Russian Trolls Used Silicon Valley’s Influence to Create Divisions

    Date published: 
    October 31, 2017

    "“I am worried that disinformation disrupts democracy,” said Malkia Cyril, founder and executive director of the Center for Media Justice in Oakland. “This is a global affair, and it’s something we should all be afraid (of).”

    Cyril and others have been pushing companies like Facebook to hire more humans and rely less on algorithms to assist in weeding out disinformation on their platforms."

  • A Marketer’s Guide To GDPR

    Date published: 
    October 31, 2017

    "Either way, if the ePrivacy regs don’t include legitimate interest, “that’s bad news for ad tech companies,” said Omer Tene, VP of research and education at the International Association of Privacy Professionals.

    “Unless there ends up being a legitimate interest revision in there, it’s hard to see how ad tech players can conceivably comply with the ePrivacy regulations,” Tene said. “This is something it’s extremely important for advertising intermediaries to be attentive to.”"

  • Info Wars: Inside the Left’s Online Efforts to Out White Supremacists

    Date published: 
    October 30, 2017

    "It would be hard to introduce a single federal law against doxxing, says Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and author of “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace,” because it runs the risk of conflicting with the First Amendment. She points out that while there are various state and federal laws in place to combat stalking, harassment and clear threats, these don’t always apply when someone’s name, address or phone number is published online. That information, after all, can be already available in the White Pages.

  • An Electric Semi Definitely Won’t Work—But Seven in a Row Might

    Date published: 
    October 26, 2017

    "On the other hand, stringing together seven trucks would represent “some advanced platooning,” said Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant law professor at the University of South Carolina who focuses on autonomous driving, in an e-mail. That number is well beyond the two or three that most platoon developers are initially aiming for, and more than any single carrier usually has traveling together at the same time, he added."

  • Twitter bans ads from two Russian media outlets, cites election meddling

    Date published: 
    October 26, 2017

    ""Banning any particular person, group or country is just bad policy - in other parts of the world, platforms will come to be viewed as a tool of U.S. or other foreign policy and it will give authoritarian regimes more excuses to ban speech," Albert Gidari, who as a lawyer has represented tech companies, said in an email. Gidari is now privacy director at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society."

  • Amazon’s Latest Way Into Your Life Is Through the Front Door

    Date published: 
    October 25, 2017

    "Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington who specializes in legal issues related to technology, said Amazon’s new service relies on the same kind of trust homeowners commonly extend to services to which they hand over their keys. But he said those agreements often involve in-person interactions, which won’t happen when homeowners allow Amazon to unlock its doors.

    “It raises questions about how do you specify and police expectations when the relationship is one mediated almost entirely by technology?” Mr. Calo said."

  • NAACP’s American Airlines warning is a wake-up call to corporate America

    Date published: 
    October 25, 2017

    "Malkia Cyril, a Black Lives Matter activist in Oakland, Calif., praised the new approach. “For the NAACP to more vocally expand its portfolio of issues to include corporate accountability is an amazing step for black communities in this country,” she said. “When we talk about racism in this country, we so often talk about government oppression and not about the role these corporations are playing in the lives of black people. I hope demanding accountability from American Airlines is only the tip of the iceberg.”"

  • What Does the FBI's New 'Black Identity Extremist' Label Really Mean to Black Organizing?

    Date published: 
    October 25, 2017

    Malkia Cyril is the founder and executive director of the Center for Media Justice, an organization best known for its leadership in the fight for net neutrality. But Cyril, who uses the pronouns “they” and ”them,” is now embroiled in a related but distinct fight—one they call “protecting Black dissidents from the FBI.” It’s a fight they’ve been preparing for since they were born to parents who were members of the Black Panther Party.

  • Tulane, Southern law clinics offer entrepreneurs intellectual property help

    Date published: 
    October 22, 2017

    ""We get questions all the time about, 'Can you help me with my patent?' But we couldn't until we got certification," said Elizabeth Townsend Gard, a Tulane Law School faculty member and co-director of the Tulane Center for IP, Media & Culture.

    Townsend Gard said in each of the past three years, her intellectual property class has done about 100 trademark searches for people.

  • A Big Test of Police Body Cameras Defies Expectations

    Date published: 
    October 20, 2017

    "“This is the most important empirical study on the impact of police body-worn cameras to date,” said Harlan Yu from Upturn, a Washington, D.C., nonprofit consulting company that studies how technology affects social issues. It was not directly involved in the research. “The results call into question whether police departments should be adopting body-worn cameras, given their high cost.”"

  • What happens to your email after you die?

    Date published: 
    October 18, 2017

    "Albert Gidari, director of privacy for Stanford University Law School’s Center for Internet and Society in California, thoroughly disagrees with his colleagues on the east coast. He told Quartz (in an email, of course) that the Massachusetts decision was “nonsense” and that this question didn’t even really need resolving.

  • 2017’s States Most Vulnerable to Identity Theft & Fraud

    Date published: 
    October 18, 2017

    "What measures can authorities undertake in order to avoid cases like the recent Equifax leaks? Should credit bureaus be tested for security breaches by authorities on a regular basis? If so, would the CFPB play a larger role in regulation and enforcement of bureaus? 

  • No One Knows What a Self-Driving Car Is, And It's Becoming a Problem

    Date published: 
    October 12, 2017

    "This could prove a problem for automakers as well as customers. “What you call something can be a kind of implicit promise that the feature is capable of behaving safely under certain circumstances,” says Ryan Calo, who specializes in cyber law and robotics at the University of Washington’s School of Law. A judge or jury could interpret Autopilot or ProPilot as a pledge that a vehicle can, well, pilot itself, regardless of the fine print."

  • Smart cities are making the places we live more vulnerable to attacks

    Date published: 
    October 12, 2017

    "Brian Nussbaum, assistant professor at the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs at the State University of New York at Albany, said in the report that “the real question is the tier below these large global cities.”

    “The NYPD [New York Police Department] has 35,000 police officers, which is almost three times the size of the FBI, so they have the capacity to specialize and work on these things in ways that even the top 20 cities in terms of population don’t.”"

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