Press

CIS in the news.

  • The Federal Government and California Are Officially at War Over Net Neutrality

    Date published: 
    October 1, 2018

    "Barbara van Schewick, a professor at Stanford Law School and the director of the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford, says that California’s new net neutrality law is on firm legal footing. “An agency that has no power to regulate has no power to preempt the states, according to case law,” van Schewick said in a statement Sunday.* “When the FCC repealed the 2015 Open Internet Order, it said it had no power to regulate broadband internet access providers.

  • California’s net neutrality rules face legal test

    Date published: 
    October 1, 2018

    "“I think the California bill is on strong legal ground,” said Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick.

    In removing the 2015 net neutrality rules, she pointed out, the Federal Communications Commission said it should not have the power to impose such restrictions on internet service providers.

    “If the FCC doesn’t have authority to adopt net neutrality rules then it can’t prevent the states from adopting their own net neutrality rules,” van Schewick said.

  • California just passed its net neutrality law. The DOJ is already suing

    Date published: 
    September 30, 2018

    "Barbara van Schewick, a professor at Stanford Law School, says the California bill is on solid legal ground and that California is within its legal rights.

    "An agency that has no power to regulate has no power to preempt the states, according to case law. When the FCC repealed the 2015 Open Internet Order, it said it had no power to regulate broadband internet access providers. That means the FCC cannot prevent the states from adopting net neutrality protections because the FCC's repeal order removed its authority to adopt such protections," said van Schewick."

  • During Senate Hearing, Tech Companies Push for Lax Federal Privacy Rules

    Date published: 
    September 26, 2018

    "Tech companies are rushing to get a seat at the table for a federal data privacy framework that could have major implications for their businesses. The push for regulation is a reversal from tech companies’ longtime approach to resist regulation, and is an effort to preempt the strict California Consumer Privacy Act, said Omer Tene, the vice president and chief knowledge officer of the nonpartisan International Association of Privacy Professionals.

  • The Always-On Police Camera

    Date published: 
    September 26, 2018

    "“Facial recognition is probably the most menacing, dangerous surveillance technology ever invented,” Woodrow Hartzog, a professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University, told me in an email. “We should all be extremely skeptical of having it deployed in any wearable technology, particularly in contexts [where] the surveilled are so vulnerable, such as in many contexts involving law enforcement.”"

  • Apple Watch’s new auto-911 calls after falls may tumble into legal trouble

    Date published: 
    September 25, 2018

    ""One of the interesting things here is that, whenever there's a change in the technology, it creates an inadvertent Fourth Amendment question," Joh told Ars. "It's a good example of how design can enhance or detract from privacy in accidental ways. I'm sure there are nothing but very good intentions behind this change in how this Apple Watch is going to work. But there are other considerations as well, because every time there is a change of this sort, there will be accidents, and there will be missteps.""

  • Showdown looms as states resurrect net neutrality rules

    Date published: 
    September 25, 2018

    "“There’s a lot of confusion about why people care so much about what California is doing,” said Barbara van Schewick, director of the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford University’s law school.

    “California is the fifth largest economy in the world and the most populous state. So if all of California is covered by net neutrality, that makes a big difference," she said. "But the California net neutrality bill is the first one that includes all of the protections in the 2015 order.”"

  • Facebook's new Dating service is ready to take on Tinder

    Date published: 
    September 20, 2018

    ""Given their track record with being good custodians of data, I'd be concerned," said Jen King, director of Consumer Privacy at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society. "But I feel like people who are going to opt into Facebook matching them with dates probably don't have that level of skepticism.""

  • Experts and local law enforcement speak about living in the Capital District post-9/11

    Date published: 
    September 18, 2018

    "Brian Nussbaum, an assistant professor at UAlbany’s College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity who specializes in topics includng terrorism, risk and intelligence analysis, agreed with Apple’s last statement in that it’s much better that both federal and state governments work together.

    He said that there has been much work done to address terrorism in the military, state department, risk and intelligence agencies, and in law enforcement across federal and state levels.

  • Edward Snowden on Protecting Activists Against Surveillance

    Date published: 
    September 18, 2018


    WIRED ICON

    Edward Snowden, NSA whistle-blower

    NOMINATES

    Malkia Cyril, Founder of the Center for Media Justice, cofounder of Media Action Grassroots Network

    PEOPLE GENERALLY ASSOCIATE the word radical with extreme. But I prefer to think of the word in reference to its Latin origin: radix, the root of the issue.

  • Three Ideas for Solving the Cybersecurity Skills Gap

    Date published: 
    September 18, 2018

    "Scott Shackelford, chair of the cybersecurity program at Indiana University, Bloomington, says one big cause of the shortage is the lack of a focused talent pipeline. To train more cybersecurity workers and make them available to local government and other organizations, he proposes a “Cybersecurity Peace Corps.”

  • Ariana Grande, Mac Miller, and Why We Blame Women for Male Substance Abuse

    Date published: 
    September 18, 2018

    ""It's deeply unsurprising to see a cyber mob descend. There’s a very quick snowballing that happens, where it’s maybe one or two people, then all of a sudden people almost get permission from other people doing it," Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and author of Hate Crimes in Cyberspace, tells VICE. "It seems normal, and the mob moves to pretty strong extremes.

  • Tinder date threatened to share nude photos if woman didn't agree to sex, warrant alleges

    Date published: 
    September 17, 2018

    ""It's devastating and we deal with the survivors of this kind of sexual extortion and violence all the time," said McGill education professor Shaheen Shariff who has published widely on cyberbullying and sexting. 

    "It's taking a while for institutions to accept that online sexual violence of this type is as harmful as actual physical violence.""

  • The Rise of Robocalls and Cell Scams—and How to Stop Them

    Date published: 
    September 14, 2018

    "Jen King was in a hurry to get out the door of her Bay Area home on a recent morning, and she missed a call to her cell phone because of it. The phone number that called her, she later discovered, was startling.

    “It was my home phone calling me, which was not possible,” says King, who recently finished a doctorate in information science and now works at Stanford University.

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