Press

CIS in the news.

  • 'A classic commons problem': Publishers are going notifications crazy

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2016

    "Publishers have quickly realized the power of mobile notifications in drawing people back to content, so naturally they’re at risk of overdoing it.

    “This is a classic commons problem,” said Andrew McLaughlin, a former partner at Betaworks. “It’s a space where if everybody behaves badly, everything gets trashed.”"

  • Some pervert cyberflashed me on the subway—And I have my iPhone to thank

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2016

    "Flashing someone is illegal, but the cyber equivalent isn’t, said Danielle Citron, a professor of law at the University of Maryland, who has written a book on cyberstalking.

    In order for what happened to me to be considered a crime—harassment—it would have to be “repeated and persistent,” according to Citron. A standard that two lewd pics probably doesn’t meet.

  • Alleged Kidnapping Raises Questions About Online Harassment

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2016

    ""We often see people who torment domestic partners will torment them and terrorize them with any tool they have, and that is on and offline," University of Maryland Professor of Law Danielle Citron told ATTN:. "It’s devastating but I’m not surprised."

    "The truth about threats is they have to be targeted at a specific person, or clear from the context that it’s targeted at a specific person and implying and suggesting that physical violence is next," Citron said.

  • Congress Is About to Expand Government Hacking Powers

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2016

    "Woodrow Hartzog, a law professor at Samford University who specializes in privacy law, says the history of computer crime law shows that vague language can lead to unintended consequences as technology evolves. “Even slight vagaries or miscalculations can result in dramatic expansions of power,” he says, citing language in the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, passed in 1986, that has created “an incredible amount of confusion” over what constitutes a crime.

  • Donald Trump’s surveillance state: All the tools to suppress dissent and kill free speech are already in place

    Date published: 
    November 27, 2016

    "“Surveillance powers have a history of abuse in totalitarian societies,” Neil Richards, a law professor at Washington University in St. Louis, told Salon. “They also have a long history of abuse in the United States, from wiretapping to new forms of digital surveillance.”

    Richards also explained that American agencies have created files on dissidents and used their power to disrupt political expression.

  • How to Fix Silicon Valley’s Sexist Algorithms

    Date published: 
    November 23, 2016

    "But not everyone believes gender bias should be eliminated from the data sets. Arvind Narayanan, an assistant professor of computer science at Princeton, has also analyzed word embedding and found gender, racial, and other prejudices. But Narayanan cautions against removing bias automatically, arguing that it could skew a computer’s representation of the real world and make it less adept at making predictions or analyzing data.

  • Area colleges advance their cyber programs

    Date published: 
    November 22, 2016

    "“They are coming to the University of Maryland, Baltimore County for promotion potential and they want to brush up on their knowledge, their professional skills and advance their career,” said UMBC director of cyber security graduate program, Dr. Richard Forno. “Not many of my students are looking to break into the field out of the blue. They are already in the field doing something with cyber but we are seeing more younger students, recent college graduates who want to continue in their education and move into cyber. That demographic is shifting a little bit.

  • Boston becomes latest city for driverless car tests, in partnership with nuTonomy

    Date published: 
    November 21, 2016

    "There are still no official plans for the public to test nuTonomy's vehicles in Boston. The cars will still be supervised by a "research driver," so they are far from "driverless," said Bryant Walker Smith, professor at the University of South Carolina, and an expert on the legal aspects of self-driving vehicles. And testing on public roads has been happening for years—Google has been doing it since 2009.

  • Who is Responsible for Autonomous Weapons?

    Date published: 
    November 21, 2016

    "Peter Asaro, a philosopher of science, technology, and media at The New School in New York City, has been working on addressing these fundamental questions of responsibility and liability with all autonomous systems, not just weapons. By exploring fundamental concepts of autonomy, agency, and liability, he intends to develop legal approaches for regulating the use of autonomous systems and the harm they cause.

  • Fake News, Hate Speech and Social Media Abuse: What’s the Solution?

    Date published: 
    November 21, 2016

    "Underpinning the moves by the social media companies is a law (section 230 of the Communications Decency Act) that that gives them “a modicum of legal protection for the content that exists on their platforms, as long as they don’t veer off too much into editorial functions,” said Andrea Matwyshyn, law professor at Northeastern University and affiliate scholar at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School.

  • Rise of the drones: from policing the streets to painting your house

    Date published: 
    November 19, 2016

    "Such is the hype. But for every tech company with its head in the clouds, there are problems to bring them back down to earth. “There are big technical challenges,” says Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington. “There’s a bunch of PhD theses that need to be completed before you can build a drone to autonomously police an area, find intruders, and use facial recognition to know who is meant to be there. Plus, having these things stay aloft beyond a few minutes is non-trivial.”"

  • Interconnectedness and Manufacturer Responsibility in Automated Vehicles

    Date published: 
    November 18, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law and (by courtesy) the School of Engineering, and Affiliate Scholar, Center of Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, argues that AVs and many other products are now connected to their manufacturers in ways that permit the manufacturers to maintain "information, access and control over the products, product users and product uses" in ways that can "expand the legal obligations and liabilities of automotive companies toward people harmed by their ­products."

  • It’s time to get rid of the Facebook “news feed,” because it’s not news

    Date published: 
    November 18, 2016

    "Facebook's highly personalized algorithmic curation of its users' newsfeeds falls in a legal gray area with respect to CDA 230. As you know, CDA 230 provides immunity for "interactive computer services," drawing a line between that category and "information content providers." But it's not entirely clear when the former becomes the latter; in other words, it's not clear when an intermediary engages in enough editing of third-party content that it becomes an "information content provider" and loses CDA 230 immunity.

  • Thai Website Shutdowns Soar After King's Death

    Date published: 
    November 17, 2016

    "Daphne Keller at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society said internet companies doing business in countries with laws restricting speech know they will be expected to comply with the rules. One common means of doing so without deleting lawful speech elsewhere is to offer country-specific versions of services, like YouTube Thailand, said Keller.

    "The company can then honor national law on the version of the service that is targeted to, and primarily used in, that country," she said."

  • Anti-Defamation League Task Force Issues Recommendations to Stem Hate That Surged on Social Media During 2016 Presidential Campaign

    Date published: 
    November 17, 2016

    "Danielle Citron, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland and member of the Task Force added, “The ADL Task Force lays out important suggestions for platforms that harmonize with their commitment to free expression. It wisely offers strategies for enhancing the transparency and fairness of the reporting process, expanding opportunities for bystanders to assist victims, and building anti-harassment tools into platforms.”"

  • Can You Crash An Autonomous Car Ethically?

    Date published: 
    November 16, 2016

    "“These are decisions that need to be thought about or programmed in advance,” said Patrick Lin, director of the Ethics and Emerging Sciences Group at California Polytechnic State University. “Either way leads to problems.” In either case, you’re targeting a vehicle class through no fault of its own."

  • Google patent shows vision of self-driving cars flocking to pick up customers

    Date published: 
    November 15, 2016

    "“You could see Google as an operator of these networks, either directly owning and operating the vehicles, or closely partnered with another entity or entities that does,” said Stanford School of Law professor and autonomous-vehicle expert Bryant Walker Smith. For production of self-driving cars, Google would probably work with a carmaker, Smith said.

  • Long-Distance Search Warrant Power Coming Dec. 1

    Date published: 
    November 14, 2016

    "Google Law Enforcement and Information Security Director Richard Salgado said the Department of Justice has made assurances about what it would do concerning the amended Rule 41 “and those are taken as sincere representations.”

  • Donald Trump is about to control the most powerful surveillance machine in history

    Date published: 
    November 14, 2016

    "Secrecy is crucial because it enables more invasive and disruptive forms of surveillance, according to University of Washington Professor Ryan Calo, who has written extensively on the topic. As long as surveillance programs are secret, it’s nearly impossible to hold them in check — and without a steady stream of whistleblowers, any new programs are likely to stay secret. As Calo told The Verge, “It’s very difficult for the public to resist surveillance that they don’t know about.”"

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