Press

CIS in the news.

  • Microsoft touts rural broadband plan at governors' meeting in Phoenix

    Date published: 
    December 1, 2017

    ""We're launching a series of pilot projects in states around the country over the course of five years," said Ryan Harkins, director of state affairs and public policy at Microsoft. 

    Harkins explained the plan during a session of the winter 2017 meeting of the Western Governors Association in Phoenix on Friday. He was part of a panel discussing the past and future of the Western United States.'

  • The Copyright Mavericks

    Date published: 
    November 30, 2017

    "Townsend-Gard dreams of a world where librarians and researchers and students don’t have to waste time on copyright determinations. “I really believe that copyright should be more like electricity, where you don’t have to figure out how it’s made,” she says. You should just be able to hit a button and get your answer."

  • SCOTUS Case Could Redefine 'Reasonable Expectatio of Privacy'

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2017

    "“A lot of what we’re getting at in the Carpenter case,” said Woodrow Hartzog, professor of law and computer science at Northeastern, “is a growing sense of discontent from the judges over the seemingly simplistic rules we crafted years ago about when and how the government can surveil and collect information about us in light of all these powerful information technologies."

  • Trump administration’s repeal of net neutrality a big gift to America’s internet providers

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2017

    "Net neutrality advocates have also expressed concern that ISPs could block certain sites outright. Barbara van Schewick, a net neutrality expert at Stanford University, writes that“Verizon told a federal court in 2013 that it should have the right to charge any website any fee Verizon liked — and if, for instance, the Wall Street Journal didn’t pay up, Verizon should be allowed to block its site.”"

  • Why Police Body Cams Aren’t What They Seem to Be

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2017

    "Few people have looked at these issues as closely as Harlan Yu at Upturn, a nonprofit based in Washington DC, who studies technology’s impact on civil rights and social justice issue.

  • The top-rated post ever in r/Nascar is about net neutrality

    Date published: 
    November 28, 2017

    "The backlash may threaten Republicans’ prospects in the US midterm elections next year. “There’s a movement afoot that Republican members of Congress ignore at their peril,” says Ryan Singel at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. Democrats may make it an issue in 2018 when all 435 seats in the House of Representatives and 33 seats in the Senate will be contested."

  • Sharing your location with your bank seems creepy, but it's useful

    Date published: 
    November 28, 2017

    "Albert Gidari, the director of privacy for the Center for Internet & Society at Stanford Law School, agreed that most of the bank's efforts with geolocation are “innocuous.”

    But he added that the always-on function seems excessive. After all, is calling your bank to tell them you're traveling that much of an inconvenience?

  • Supreme Court to weigh in over US patent battle

    Date published: 
    November 27, 2017

    "Supporters of the reviews, meanwhile, say they are a much-needed corrective for a system that has issued far too many low-quality patents. Patent office examiners spend an average of 18 hours reviewing each application, too little time to research all the evidence that might invalidate a claim, says Daniel Nazer at the Electronic Frontier Foundation."

  • The End of Net Neutrality Means ISPs Could Crack Down on Cryptocurrencies

    Date published: 
    November 27, 2017

    "“The average person goes to Coinbase to buy Bitcoin, Ethereum, or Litecoin—the average on-ramp is an exchange, and those are easy to block,” said Marvin Ammori, a lawyer who is on the board of digital advocacy group Fight for the Future, over the phone. “If Comcast is the monopoly provider in an area, the provider could decide there’s a preferred Bitcoin exchange.”"

  • Facebook to expand artificial intelligence to help prevent suicide

    Date published: 
    November 27, 2017

    "But it may be more difficult for tech firms to justify scanning conversations in other situations, said Ryan Calo, a University of Washington law professor who writes about tech.

    “Once you open the door, you might wonder what other kinds of things we would be looking for,” Calo said."

  • Campaign to Prevent Violent Traffic Stops Tells Drivers to Keep Cool

    Date published: 
    November 24, 2017

    "The ads also stop short of fully explaining the rights of a citizen in a traffic stop, according to Harlan Yu, the executive director of Upturn, a nonprofit that studies how technology affects social issues.

    “One thing that I think is missing from this is how somebody who does get stopped, where the officers are wearing body-worn cameras, how that person is able to get body-worn camera video,” Mr. Yu said."

  • Uber's massive hack: What we know

    Date published: 
    November 23, 2017

    "According to Andrea Matwyshyn, professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University, if companies help cyber criminals make money off hacks, they will only continue.

  • Should Washington begin regulating Facebook? Some lawmakers say yes.

    Date published: 
    November 23, 2017

    "Policy experts also question how the bill would actually work. Daphne Keller of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society pointed to the challenges of determining whether an ad buyer is a foreign entity, particularly if buyers rely on outside vendors to purchase ads.

    “Nobody knows how to figure out who counts as Russian,” she said. “It seems extremely easy to hide your identity.”"

  • The driverless revolution may exact a political price

    Date published: 
    November 21, 2017

    "“It was a political sign that there is fear” about the impact of the trucks, said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who researches vehicle automation. “But it is not in the long term going to hamper their deployment.”"

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