Press

CIS in the news.

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  • Study of 1 million sites shows just how closely we’re watched

    Date published: 
    June 1, 2016

    "Studying a million websites is hard. To do it, Arvind Narayanan – who heads the Web Transparency and Accountability Project at Princeton University – built a tool called OpenWPM with graduate student Steven Englehardt. OpenWPM can visit and log in to websites automatically, taking more than a dozen measurements of each one. It took two weeks to crawl through the top million websites, as ranked by web traffic firm Alexa.

  • Do driverless cars mean I’ll never need to take my driving test?

    Date published: 
    June 1, 2016

    "“The things we expect to happen the fastest will take the longest. It’s the things we don’t ever see coming that arrive soonest.” This sounds like a quote that would be misattributed to Sartre on the internet, but I see his point.

    There are, Smith says, myriad legal issues, which means manufacturers and developers may have to take the aggressive stance of, say, Uber (it is everywhere!) to push legislative changes through."

  • The moral of the killer robot

    Date published: 
    June 1, 2016

    (Google Translate version)

    "The American philosopher Peter Asaro is one of the leaders of the global resistance against fighting robots. "Unlike humans, they are not able to make moral and legal considerations."

  • EU hate speech deal shows mounting pressures over internet content blocking

    Date published: 
    May 31, 2016

    ""Other countries will look at this and say, 'This looks like a good idea, let's see what leverage I have to get similar agreements,'" said Daphne Keller, former associate general counsel at Google and director of intermediary liability at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

    "Anybody with an interest in getting certain types of content removed is going to find this interesting.""

  • Digital shift opens door to ransomware attacks

    Date published: 
    May 30, 2016

    "When a victim pays the ransom — typically in digital bitcoins — the thieves provide a digital key to unlock the system. Yet hackers who aren't motivated by money could refuse to offer a key, said Brian Nussbaum, a former security intelligence analyst who teaches computer security at State University of New York at Albany.

  • Kaur and Archuleta: A Sikh, a Mormon, and a dozen Interfaith University Graduates

    Date published: 
    May 27, 2016

    "If I had been a Christian, I would be a preacher, she said to me. You are - you have found your way! I replied. Valarie Kaur is easily one of the best speakers I have ever heard, and I am a preacher. With great care, Valarie called and emailed students the week prior to her address so she could answer their questions when she spoke at our Baccalaureate service at Chapman University this year.

  • A New Way to Report College Sexual Assault

    Date published: 
    May 27, 2016

    "Collecting sexual assault reports online introduces some new concerns. Hackers could try to get access to the data, exposing the identities of both survivors and alleged perpetrators. Encryption and other security practices can reduce that risk but not completely eliminate it, said Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland who studies privacy. Both Callisto and Lighthouse encrypt their data."

  • Ivan the Terminator: Russia Is Showing Off Its New Robot Soldier

    Date published: 
    May 26, 2016

    "Peter Asaro, a spokesman for the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots and an artificial intelligence expert at The New School, similarly said Russian drones wouldn't be an immediate game changer in the rising tensions between Russia and the West.

    "It's already pretty well acknowledged that if Russia wants to invade the Baltics, they can do it in 24 hours and NATO can't do much about it," Asaro said. "Them having some super sophisticated robot isn't going to change that."

  • What to Do When a Robot Is the Guilty Party

    Date published: 
    May 25, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith from the University of South Carolina proposed regulatory flexibility for rapidly evolving technologies, such as driverless cars. “Individual companies should make a public case for the safety of their autonomous vehicles,” he said. “They should establish measures and then monitor them over the lifetime of their systems. We need a diversity of approaches to inform public debate.”

  • First White House AI workshop focuses on how machines (plus humans) will change government

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2016

    "Intelligent machines won’t be ruling the world anytime soon – but what happens when they turn you down for a loan, crash your car or discriminate against you because of your race or gender?

    On one level, the answer is simple: “It depends,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who specializes in the issues raised by autonomous vehicles."

  • White House to come to UW, engage in discussions on artificial intelligence and law

    Date published: 
    May 23, 2016

    "In relation to the role of government in AI, Ryan Calo, assistant law professor at the UW and faculty director of the Tech Policy Lab, and one of the speakers, suggests that the government isn’t trying to control the use of AI, but realizes its technological significance.

    “The White House realizes that people must channel resources to research AI and to remain globally competitive,” Calo said. 

  • Safe or Good? We All Have Choices to Make

    Date published: 
    May 23, 2016

    "In contrast, courts have not forced individuals to reveal the passcodes used to secure their mobile devices.[2] What gives? Albert Gidari, the director of privacy at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, explains that the Fifth Amendment protects thoughts, not things: “Unlike disclosing passcodes, you are not compelled to speak or say what’s ‘in your mind’ to law enforcement,” Gidari said.

  • Apple’s Touch ID rules may be designed to protect human rights

    Date published: 
    May 23, 2016

    "I spoke to Geoffrey King, the technology program coordinator at the Committee to Protect Journalists, a group devoted to reducing the danger to reporters worldwide and publicizing jailed and missing writers. Journalists and activists often receive the brunt of a government’s worst behavior in the interests in shutting them up and shutting them down. “We protect the people who anger everybody else,” King noted.

  • White House, University of Washington Co-host Artificial Intelligence Workshop

    Date published: 
    May 23, 2016

    "UW Law Professor Ryan Calo, says imagine you’ve been placed on no-fly list.

    “It’s not as though there’s some dossier that you could look at and see exactly what’s going on. It’s the result of artificial intelligence in that sense, combing through lots of information and spitting out a likelihood that you’re a problem,” he said. “How do you appeal that? What recourse do you have?”

  • Huge new study shows that Google is watching you everywhere you go

    Date published: 
    May 20, 2016

    "All of this might sound terrifying, but as assistant professor Arvind Narayanan and graduate student Steven Englehardt explain, the preeminence of Google, Facebookand others like them means that we only have a few major companies that we need to keep track of, rather than hundreds or thousands of smaller companies.

    “Only a small number of companies have trackers that are really prevalent,” says Narayanan. “This suggests that external oversight and public pressure can lead to positive change.”"

  • Google patent: Glue would stick pedestrian to self-driving car after collision

    Date published: 
    May 19, 2016

    "Stanford School of Law professor and autonomous car expert Bryant Walker Smith praised Google -- once he stopped laughing about the patent.

    "The idea that cars should be safe for people other than the ones in them is the next generation of automotive safety," Smith said. "Manufacturers have gotten remarkably good at protecting the occupants of the vehicle, but there's been much less attention to protecting the people outside. I applaud anybody for thinking, as they should, about people outside of the vehicle."

  • Paying without passwords and PINs

    Date published: 
    May 16, 2016

    Back in 2000, ING Direct Canada – the digital bank that became Tangerine Bank – piloted a “biometric” mouse that would scan users’ fingerprints to help bypass the need for passwords.

    “Installing the mouse involved 16 different registry changes,” says Charaka Kithulegoda, Tangerine’s chief information officer, referring to changes to computer settings. “We said, ‘The tech works great, the concept works, but the experience is awful.’”

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