Press

CIS in the news.

  • When Law Enforcement Comes Knocking, Companies Can Start Fighting

    Date published: 
    August 4, 2016

    "Touching on cases like the Snowden or the Lavabit incidents, the duo strongly emphasized that companies should start asking themselves a couple of questions before law enforcement actually comes knocking at their door. Knowing what they collect, how they store it, for how long, why, what can it access, does it encrypt data and where are keys stored – are only a few of them.

  • The rise of police body cameras: Who's doing it right?

    Date published: 
    August 4, 2016

    "“There’s a real fear among many civil rights advocates and communities that body-worn cameras will become just another tool for surveillance,” Mr. Yu tells the Monitor by phone.

    A number of police departments have pushed back against the criteria for body camera policies outlined in the study, says Dr. Yu, including Fresno, Calif., a city which failed every one of the eight categories outlined in the report."

  • Sites Spying on You in Weird New Ways, Princeton Study Exposes

    Date published: 
    August 4, 2016

    ""Several features of the web...are being used or abused, depending on how one looks at it, by these tracking companies and various entities in the ad tech ecosystem," said study co-author Arvind Narayanan, an associate professor of computer science at Princeton. "They're being used in sneaky ways to track where users are going across the web.""

  • Pittsburgh police release body-cam policy synopsis

    Date published: 
    August 3, 2016

    "Release of the synopsis was not enough to satisfy the Washington, D.C.-based Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and Upturn, a technology consultant, which Tuesday released a report that gave Pittsburgh low marks for its transparency on body-worn cameras. The groups said Pittsburgh was one of only three U.S. police departments of the 50 it surveyed whose policy could not be found in the public domain. The others were Detroit and Aurora, Colo.

  • Apple’s New Privacy Technology May Pressure Competitors to Better Protect Our Data

    Date published: 
    August 3, 2016

    "Arvind Narayanan, an assistant professor at Princeton University, is hopeful that Apple’s privacy stand will pressure other companies to follow suit. The popularity of Snapchat’s disappearing messages, and the occasional outcry when a company is caught doing something that looks unseemly, show that people do care about privacy, even if the tech industry provides few opportunities to express that, he says.

  • Chicago Police body camera policies score high

    Date published: 
    August 2, 2016

    "Harlan Yu, a principal at Upturn, said the discussion of when an officer should turn on a body camera is extremely important after O’Neal’s death.  

    “Looking at Chicago’s policies, or at least the policies itself, it fully satisfied our criteria,” Yu said. “Presumably, in that situation, the officer was required to have the camera on. Obviously, the question is whether an officer violates that policy, what procedures are in place and what does the department do in those cases. I think that remains to be seen.”"

  • Activists give Boston’s body camera pilot program a mixed review

    Date published: 
    August 2, 2016

    "Harlan Yu, a principal at Upturn, lauded Boston police for prohibiting use of facial recognition technology that would let officers take an image and use it to glean information about an individual. He said it is a policy that “departments across the country should take note of.”

    The activists say officers could tailor their statements to reflect only what can be seen in the video, and leave out anything the camera did not capture. There is also concern the policy gives police an advantage over other witnesses.

  • Memphis Police Department’s body camera policy receives low scores from national group

    Date published: 
    August 2, 2016

    "“No department received a green light on this criteria,” said Harlan Yu, a principal at Upturn, who worked on the score card with the Leadership Conference. “However, six department policies have partial prohibitions in place, for certain critical incidents like officer shootings.” 

    “Even if it is not a full implementation and all officers don’t have them, I think it is important that these policies be available, even during the pilot stage, to ensure when there is a full implementation that the policies are appropriate,” Yu said about Memphis."
  • Arizona police agencies get low marks for body camera policies

    Date published: 
    August 2, 2016

    "“They got six red and two yellows and no greens, so I think hopefully this scorecard helps community advocates in Phoenix identify areas where the department policies could improve,” said Harlan Yu, a principal technologist at Upturn, the consulting firm that helped create the report.

  • July is a hot month for zero rating

    Date published: 
    July 27, 2016

    "The Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications (BEREC) concluded a consultation on its guidelines for net neutrality on 18 July.  As I describe in my comments, the EU law for open internet access never mentions the terms net neutrality, zero rating, or specialised services, but BEREC has developed 43 pages of de facto rules based upon these introduced terms.  Moreover amendments related to these items were unanimously rejected by the European Parliament

  • Future Safety of Autonomous Vehicles Highlighted at Conference

    Date published: 
    July 27, 2016

    "Autonomous vehicles’ rollout face tough value judgements that compare to rushing a drug to market before its dangers are fully known, said Patrick Lin, Cal Polytechnic Univ. professor for emerging technologies.  “It also looks like a lot of the autonomous vehicle research is using human subjects.  Human Guinea pigs,” he said.

  • Tesla's Master Plan 2.0: AI experts, auto insiders, and Tesla customers weigh in

    Date published: 
    July 26, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law and School of Engineering, is one of the leading thinkers in the autonomous vehicle world with insight into the legal aspects of driverless vehicles on the road.

    Smith has "no criticisms" about Tesla Master Plan part deux. "It's good that Tesla is sharing its vision with the public," he said. "In other contexts, Tesla does need to be more concrete and share more of the data and analyses that underlie its conclusions. But this is not one of those contexts."

  • Police robots: Departments lack rules on whether they can kill

    Date published: 
    July 26, 2016

    "Ryan Calo, who teaches robotics law at the University of Washington, agreed.

    "Robots raise special concerns in society," Calo said, pointing to movie depictions of autonomous killer robots and their use in war zones. Law enforcement agencies need to take steps to ensure the public that robots are being used appropriately, he said.

    He said the frequent use of robots to kill would go beyond what the country is ready for. "I just cannot imagine in our society right now, that we would tolerate robots that were routinely armed.""

  • T-Mobile adds ABC, Disney and others to Binge On as Legere jabs Verizon's Go90

    Date published: 
    July 26, 2016

    "T-Mobile has come under fire from net neutrality advocates who claim that the technical requirements to join Binge On give an unfair edge to content providers who can afford to make their offerings compliant. Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick published a paper earlier this year saying Binge On is "likely illegal" due in part to those requirements.

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