Press

CIS in the news.

  • 50 years later, Black Lives Matter takes up Panthers’ fight

    Date published: 
    October 14, 2016

    "“It’s a vehicle for us to explain issues that have been ignored by mainstream media,” said Malkia Cyril. A Black Lives Matter activist in Oakland, she’s the daughter of the late Janet Cyril, who ran the Black Panthers’ free breakfast program. “When black people were able to live-stream the violence of police officers on Facebook Live,” she said, “that changed the dynamic of power.”"

  • Experts praise White House AI report but split on regulation

    Date published: 
    October 14, 2016

    "Ryan Calo a law professor at University of Washington, said when human lives are involved, government should sign off on new technology.

    “My basic view is that someone is going to have to sign off on this stuff, especially when we’re talking about artificial intelligence that acts directly with the world in a physical way,” Calo said. "

  • Apple and Samsung reach Supreme Court in patent row

    Date published: 
    October 11, 2016

    ""That would be the understanding the majority of law professors would advocate for," suggested Prof Andrea Matwyshyn from Northwestern University in Boston.

    She said while design of, say, a carpet could be considered the be-all-and-end-all of its success, a smartphone is a far more complex device. Design is important, but not the only factor.

    The fact that Apple is pushing for full damages is a strategy that suggests extreme confidence in its ability to stay ahead of the curve in technology, Prof Matwyshyn said.

  • As License-Plate Tracking Increases, Privacy Advocates Press for More Regulation

    Date published: 
    October 11, 2016

    "Nevertheless, there are some avenues for reform. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration offers grants for states to buy ALPRs for “highway safety” and Catherine Crump, associate director of Berkeley Law’s Samuelson Law, Technology, and Public Policy Clinic, says the federal government could require states to adopt official ALPR policies as a condition of receiving those funds.

  • Subpoena to Encrypted App Provider Highlights Overbroad FBI Requests for Information

    Date published: 
    October 11, 2016

    "According to Al Gidari, the director of privacy at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society and a former attorney for many of the major technology companies — requests for transactional data for an application like Signal should probably require a court order rather than a subpoena, or what’s known as a 2703 (d) order.

    “I would say that upstream and downstream providers as listed in the Signal subpoena is outside the scope” of what FBI can ask for, he wrote in an email. He compared this information to “email header information.”

  • Crime-prediction tool PredPol amplifies racially biased policing, study shows

    Date published: 
    October 9, 2016

    "Malkia Cyril, executive director of the Oakland-based Center for Media Justice, says Oakland's legislators don't care that PredPol hasn't proven to be effective.

    "Predictive policing is clearly not a solution, and it'll transfer existing bias and existing iniquities in the current policing system into a predictive approach," Cyril said. "It's not technology that makes the place a city more efficient and a better place to live. For us, it'll make the city unlivable.""

  • Appeals court restores previously-dismissed surveillance lawsuit

    Date published: 
    October 8, 2016

    "Riana Pfefferkorn, a legal researcher and attorney at Stanford University, told Ars:

    With there being a fair number of cases out there that have taken a pretty dim view of plaintiff standing in these sorts of mass surveillance cases—he will have an uphill battle unless he has an extra ace up the sleeve to show that he was personally subjected to the surveillance that he was challenging."

  • Will Yahoo Face Lawsuits Over Email Surveillance?

    Date published: 
    October 6, 2016

    "That order grants Yahoo immunity, said Albert Gidari, director of privacy at Stanford University's Center for Internet and Society. "I think it is pretty clear that if Yahoo rendered technical assistance to the government pursuant to a FISA order or directive, it faces no liability for doing so and is immunized for doing so," Gidari said in an email.

  • Sony brings hammer down on Wiener’s Katy Perry drag-queen video

    Date published: 
    October 5, 2016

    "Ben Depoorter, a professor at UC Hastings College of the Law who is an expert in copyright law, says this is typical of entertainment companies that worry about alienating potential buyers by having their performers associated with politics. Exhibit A is the country group the Dixie Chicks, who criticized then-President George W. Bush on stage in 2003 and faced a backlash that nearly ended their careers.

  • Ambiguity surrounds IC body camera policy as deadline nears

    Date published: 
    October 5, 2016

    "Harlan Yu, a principal at Upturn, a technology consulting firm, studies how new technologies affect civil rights. He said for a policy to be beneficial to the campus community, it needs to succeed in all criteria.

    “I would look closely at the scorecard, at each of our eight criteria, and see that the campus police eventually scores a green in each of their criteria,” Yu said.

  • Robot Law, book review: People will be the problem

    Date published: 
    October 5, 2016

    "In 2012, Ryan Calo and Michael Froomkin -- law professors at the Universities of Washington and Miami respectively -- sensed that robots were at approximately the stage of the internet circa 1988, and began to think about how to preemptively create good policy about them. Where, they asked, were the legal conflicts going to be? What new laws will be needed, what existing laws can be adapted, what metaphors will apply?

  • Robots Are Developing Feelings. Will They Ever Become "People"?

    Date published: 
    October 4, 2016

    "Robots can show emotions without actually having emotions, though. "Robots are now designed to exhibit emotion," says Patrick Lin, director of the Ethics + Emerging Sciences Group at California Polytechnic State University. "When we say robots have emotion, we don't mean they feel happy or sad or have mental states. This is shorthand for, they seem to exhibit behavior that we humans interpret as such and such.""

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