Press

CIS in the news.

  • Big data sellers fail to hide personal information, say funds

    Date published: 
    December 11, 2016

    "But there is no overarching US privacy law to protect consumers, with standards set individually by different states, industries and even companies, according to Albert Gidari, director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. Still, there are no signs of a backlash.

    “Ultimately, history shows how willing people are to give up some privacy for some convenience,” Mr Gidari said."

  • Michigan Just Embraced the Driverless Future

    Date published: 
    December 9, 2016

    "“As near as I can tell from the language and the context, what’s going on is a specific effort to implement a specific regime for a specific company,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a legal scholar with the University of South Carolina School of Law who studies self-driving vehicles.

  • Michigan lets autonomous cars on roads without human driver

    Date published: 
    December 9, 2016

    "But Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who tracks the technology, says Florida has almost no restrictions. Other states, he said, don't expressly prohibit such testing and have agreements with individual companies to do it. Michigan's laws also make defining who is a driver ambiguous, he said. Drivers could be companies running autonomous taxi services, engineers who start autonomous vehicles, passengers who ride in the cars and the automated systems themselves, he said."

  • Michigan gets forward-thinking self-driving laws

    Date published: 
    December 9, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina law professor who closely follows the legal issues tied to self-driving technology, said that particular bill is “somewhat confusing because it would seem to subvert many proposed restrictions on research tests and on-demand automated motor vehicle networks.”"

  • Michigan Just Passed the Most Permissive Self-Driving Car Laws in the Country

    Date published: 
    December 9, 2016

    "Still, there are some questions about the clarity of the language in SB 995 and , according to Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor of law and engineering at the University of South Carolina and a scholar at Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School. “The language is so unclear that I can’t even say what it actually does,” Smith said in an email, adding that while the final laws did change they are “still a mess.”

  • You Should Be Able to Use Tesla's Self-Driving Mode to Make Money

    Date published: 
    December 9, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina, and a specialist in the emerging legal frameworks for autonomous vehicles, says that this is part of a shift by Tesla and other automakers towards framing the vehicles they make as services rather than products.

  • The political fight behind Facebook and Google’s new terrorist content database

    Date published: 
    December 8, 2016

    "“[The database] is definitely responsive to what’s going on in Europe,” says Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland, who specializes in cyber law and harassment. “What you’re finding is just a manifestation of this code of conduct from May, coupled with pressure from the United Kingdom and European Union.”"

  • Instagram is the latest social media firm to tweak its app in an attempt to prevent harassment

    Date published: 
    December 6, 2016

    "Danielle Citron, professor of law at the University of Maryland, welcomes the changes because she said they give users more control over the content with which they interact. She noted that Instagram is merely catching up with policies already in place at Facebook. 

    “The most important thing is educating users about what is acceptable on the site,” Citron said. 

    She added that tech companies have come a long way in moderating user behavior, but that they can be more sophisticated and clear in their approach to what constitutes harassment."

  • What Elaine Chao as Transportation secretary could mean for commercial drone use

    Date published: 
    December 6, 2016

    "Ryan Calo, an assistant professor of law at the University of Washington who specializes in robotics law and policy, said fewer regulations could benefit some specific drone industries, such as delivery. That potential enterprise has been hindered by regulations that prevent drones from carrying packages unless the total weight of the drone plus the load is less than 55 pounds, as well as limitations on flying beyond visual line of sight."

  • State Justices Suppress Smartphone Evidence in Child Porn Case

    Date published: 
    December 5, 2016

    "Catherine Crump, acting director of the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic at University of California, Berkeley and co-counsel for Macabeo, said the decision is significant not so much because it safeguards phone data but rather because it resists an expansion of the grounds for warrantless police searches.

  • David Levine joins editorial board of Secrecy and Society

    Date published: 
    December 5, 2016

    "Associate Professor David S. Levine is one of 18 leading scholars from around the world - and the only law professor - serving on the founding editorial board of a new online journal dedicated to the nascent scholarly field of secrecy.

  • How Otto defied Nevada and scored a $680 million payout from Uber

    Date published: 
    December 4, 2016

    "Otto’s argument might not hold up if challenged, says Ryan Calo, a law professor who teaches a class on robotics law and policy at the University of Washington: “One question is whether or not monitoring counts if you’re not in the driver’s seat. Often customs wind up informing the law and the custom here is that other testers, like Google and Tesla, actually have a person sitting in front of the steering wheel.”

  • What will the Data Breach Landscape Look Like in 2017?

    Date published: 
    December 4, 2016

    "Omer Tene, Vice President of Research and Education for International Association of Privacy Professionals, added “Clearly, the biggest challenge for businesses in 2017 will be preparing for the entry into force of the GDPR, a massive regulatory framework with implications for budget and staff, carrying stiff fines and penalties in an unprecedented amount.”

  • Lawyers: New court software is so awful it’s getting people wrongly arrested

    Date published: 
    December 2, 2016

    "Elizabeth Joh, a criminal law professor at the University of California, Davis, told Ars that this situation was alarming. “Errors do occur in the criminal justice system, but in the past only people were to blame,” she e-mailed. “How do you blame software, and who is responsible? These kinds of systemic technology problems pose a real challenge to individual criminal defendants, who may sometimes not be aware of the source of the error—and it looks like Tyler Technologies is rejecting any responsibility.”"

  • How Algorithms Can Bring Down Minorities' Credit Scores

    Date published: 
    December 2, 2016

    "Preventing algorithmic discrimination is a challenge. It’s not easy to hold companies to the laws that would protect consumers from unfair credit practices, says Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland. “We don’t have hard and fast rules. It’s the Wild West in some respects.”"

  • Are Blockchain Patents a Bad Idea?

    Date published: 
    December 1, 2016

    "Daniel Nazer, a lawyer with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, told Fortune that applications to patent the blockchain — which is a form of software — face a high hurdle due to a Supreme Court case called Alice. That decision ruled that most, or perhaps all, software patents are abstract ideas that are ineligible for patent protection.

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