Press

CIS in the news.

  • A Guide to Getting Past Customs With Your Digital Privacy Intact

    Date published: 
    February 12, 2017

    "Those more involved subversion techniques, warns University of California at Davis law professor Elizabeth Joh, also create the risk that you’ll also arouse more suspicion, making CBP agents all the more likely to detain you or deny entrance to the country. But she has no better answer. “There’s not that much you can do when you cross the border in terms of the government’s power,” she admits."

  • Internet firms’ legal immunity is under threat

    Date published: 
    February 11, 2017

    "In May a court allowed a lawsuit to proceed against Model Mayhem, a network that connects models and photographers, for having failed to warn users that rapists have used the site to target victims. In June a judge decided that Yelp, a site for crowdsourced reviews, cannot challenge a court order to remove a defamatory review of a lawyer by a client. Courts and lawmakers are not about to abolish section 230, says Daphne Keller of the Centre for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, but it is unlikely to survive for decades."

  • 'Give Us Your Passwords'

    Date published: 
    February 10, 2017

    "“While the reasonable-suspicion standard for a border search is pretty low, it would at least preclude a blanket rule that every traveler disclose their passwords to online material and services,” said Al Gidari, the director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society."

  • Got a Self-Driving Car? Soon, No License Will Be Required

    Date published: 
    February 7, 2017

    "“If there is no driver, there is no need for a driving license, just as the passenger in a taxi needs no license to get a ride,” Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor in the School of Law at the University of South Carolina, tells Inverse. “The relevant state law questions are whether an automated vehicle requires a human driver, who that driver is, and what she must do and may not do.”"

  • U.S. House Passes Bill Requiring Warrants to Search Old Emails

    Date published: 
    February 7, 2017

    "Richard Salgado, director of law enforcement and information security at Google (GOOG, +0.47%), said in a statement the measure would "fix a constitutional flaw" in the ECPA. "While there are disagreements about other aspects of surveillance reform, there is no disagreement that emails and electronic content deserve Fourth Amendment protections," he said."

  • Uber hires NASA veteran to work on flying autonomous cars

    Date published: 
    February 6, 2017

    ""These tech companies are determined to make self-driving cars seem boring by comparison!" said Bryant Walker Smith, associate professor at the University of South Carolina and an expert in the legal implications of autonomous driving. "We're at the beginning of this technological curve, where companies are competing for public attention before they've figured out their role in this potential market.""

  • Tech Giants Have the Legal Clout to Help Stop Trump’s Refugee Ban

    Date published: 
    February 6, 2017

    "“The tech industry has been increasingly active in recent years in cases that involve the civil rights of their customers or, like in this case, their employees,” says Neil Richards, a professor at Washington University School of Law in St. Louis. “Courts do take the views of industry seriously in these cases, particularly when those views seem broader than merely guarding the bottom line.”"

  • Area law enforcement moving to deploy body cameras

    Date published: 
    February 4, 2017

    "Harlan Yu, a principal at Upturn, pointed out that the police chief has the authority to bar an officer from viewing a recording, particularly if it includes a “significant traumatic event.” Yet he added that “you can imagine a situation where the chief of police always eventually gives an officer involved in a shooting the leeway to watch the footage.”"

  • Tech Could Do More to Oppose Trump—at a Price

    Date published: 
    February 3, 2017

    "But standing up to a president also carries risks, especially for publicly traded companies, which face a legal obligation to put profit ahead of protest. “For companies that are acting in their self-interest, the process is sitting down and looking at this matrix, and trying to figure out how to be effective,” says Andrew McLaughlin, a venture partner at Betaworks and deputy chief technology officer of the United States under President Obama."

  • Facebook, Google, Apple Lead U.S. Business Charge Against Trump Travel Ban

    Date published: 
    February 3, 2017

    "The upcoming letter will be another show of unity for the industry, said Andrew Bridges, a lawyer at Fenwick & West who is not involved in the drafting of the letter but has worked with many of the same companies on unrelated matters. "My fear is that the ban, both literally and secondarily as a reflection of broader policies, is going to threaten the American economy in the most fundamental way," Bridges said, adding that given Trump's recent proposals, "Why would any global company want to have its headquarters in the U.S.?""

  • The 2,578 Problems With Self-Driving Cars

    Date published: 
    February 2, 2017

    "“Waymo’s report would seem to suggest substantial improvement,” says Bryant Walker-Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina. “But I’d want to know whether Waymo’s system could handle any of the system-initiated disengagements by achieving a minimal risk condition, say by pulling off to the side of the road, rather than immediately disengaging.”"

  • Alert: Sunrise Coming in May for New Privacy Law, Enforcer in Japan

    Date published: 
    February 2, 2017

    "Woodrow Hartzog, Starnes Professor of Law at the Cumberland School of Law at Samford University, told Bloomberg BNA that the amended act “makes some very important changes, but like with most new pieces of privacy legislation, many important terms will need to be more fully defined and interpreted.”

    Hartzog said that “under the old law, the privacy rules were largely conceived of as obligations on businesses.” Companies will probably see a rise in individuals requesting access to personal data and seeking to delete or correct that information, he said."

  • These 23 Principles Could Help Us Avoid an AI Apocalypse

    Date published: 
    February 2, 2017

    "Patrick Lin, a conference attendee and the the director of the Ethics + Emerging Sciences Group at California Polytechnic State University, says the Asilomar AI principles sprung from “a perfect storm of influences” he hadn’t encountered before. “This was a standard-setting exercise in a field that has no cohesive identity, making the exercise much more difficult,” he told Gizmodo."

  • Experts: DMV reports reveal driverless cars still need humans at the helm

    Date published: 
    February 1, 2017

    "“It’s a small glimpse into a small part of what a relatively small number of companies are doing,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a scholar with Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society.

    There are more questions that need answers, Smith said, such as what would happen if the driver didn’t intervene. Would the car know to pull to the side of the road to avoid a collision?"

  • Encryption for All: Why This American Tradition Must Be Upheld

    Date published: 
    January 31, 2017

    "While many proponents of backdoors say that they are vital to intelligence gathering processes, privacy advocates like King believe that the very premise of a backdoor is faulty. “If you put a backdoor in for law enforcement, you put it in for China, you put it in for Russia,” King says. Meaning: if you engineer a backdoor for one purpose, you can’t guarantee that it won’t be exploited for another."

  • Trump’s SCOTUS Pick Needs to Get Tech—These Cases Show Why

    Date published: 
    January 31, 2017

    "Now the Supreme Court, which will hear arguments in this case in February, must decide whether constitutional rights apply across US borders. That’s where things get interesting for tech firms who store data on servers all over the world. “It sounds like it has nothing to do with technology, until you think about cloud,” says Neil Richards, a professor at Washington University Law School."

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