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  • Experts Question The FBI’s Thinking In Keeping iPhone Hack A Secret

    Date published: 
    March 31, 2016

    "Riana Pfefferkorn, the cryptography fellow at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society, told BuzzFeed News that responsible disclosures can enable companies like Apple to “to alert their users, come up with a fix, and push it out to their users through software updates.” But from the Justice Department’s perspective, a successful security patch can also represent the loss of a law enforcement tool. “The key thing is that Apple can’t fix what they don’t know about, so the DOJ wouldn’t lose this method if they keep it secret,” Pfefferkorn said.

  • Terrain may alter future encryption-security fights

    Date published: 
    March 29, 2016

    "“The entire process is confined to executive-branch agencies. It is not a creature of Congress. As to whether a company could proactively seek review of an exploit, I doubt that there is a provision for that,” said Riana Pfefferkorn, a fellow at The Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School."

  • VENUE Act aims to lessen ease of filing patent lawsuits in Eastern District of Texas

    Date published: 
    March 28, 2016

    "“The VENUE Act would make it harder for companies to file a suit in districts that don’t have meaningful connection to the suit,” Daniel Nazer, staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Mark Cuban Chair to Eliminate Stupid Patents, told the Southeast Texas Record. “This bill is really about making sure disputes are filed somewhere that makes sense.”"

  • U.S. Says It Has Unlocked iPhone Without Apple

    Date published: 
    March 28, 2016

    "“Courts should be skeptical going forward when the government claims it has no other option besides compelling a device maker’s assistance,” said Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

    “Now that the F.B.I. has accessed this iPhone, it should disclose the method for doing so to Apple,” she added. “Apple ought to have the chance to fix that security issue, which likely affects many other iPhones.”"

  • FBI Hacks Into San Bernardino Shooter's iPhone Without Apple's Help, Drops Case

    Date published: 
    March 28, 2016

    "“I think Apple will fight as hard as they can, but the moment the FBI withdraws the motion, Apple will have a difficult time finding anything out,” said Riana Pfefferkorn, a fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society who filed an amicus ‘friend of the court’ brief in the case supporting Apple."

  • California lawmaker pushes for driver-free robot car testing on public roads

    Date published: 
    March 25, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina, says, “A law that gives individual communities more flexibility in working with these developers could be a good thing.” But he also points out that Google shaped the original autonomous vehicle legislation in California, which disadvantaged systems that the company was not pursuing, such as automated lorries.

  • Honda Asked Takata To Change Air Bag in 2009

    Date published: 
    March 25, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and an expert in automotive safety and regulation, said Honda could make an argument that “it’s always improving its products — for instance, that airbags are getting safer every year,” he said. “I’m not sure how a jury would approach or examine that.”"

  • It’s Your Fault Microsoft’s Teen AI Turned Into Such a Jerk

    Date published: 
    March 25, 2016

    "So what now? It was unfortunate that the chat bot was deployed under the Microsoft brand name, with Tay’s Twitter responses seeming to come from Tay, not learned from anyone else, says Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington who studies AI policy. In the future, he proposes, maybe we’ll have a mechanism for labeling so that the process of where Tay is pulling responses from is more transparent."

  • Editorial: Body camera policies must benefit both police and the policed

    Date published: 
    March 24, 2016

    ""By allowing pre-report viewing, statements from officers will always appear more accurate and more credible than other witnesses statements, which would unnecessarily tilt the justice system even further against criminal defendants," said Harlan Yu, a principal with technology consulting firm Upturn, which last yearcollaborated on a camera policy "scorecard" compiled by the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, which represents more than 200 national organizations.

  • The Tricky Ethics of Living Longer

    Date published: 
    March 24, 2016

    "“We can't cherry-pick the costs or savings to focus on,” says Patrick Lin, director of the Ethics + Emerging Sciences Group at California Polytechnic State University. Instead, he says,to fairly examine the ethics involved, we should consider impacts both on the individual and society level. “Yes, healthier people may mean lower health costs and more productivity, but that's a partial picture at best.

  • Experts weigh in on Brussels attacks

    Date published: 
    March 23, 2016

    "At least 34 people are reported dead after a series of blasts at Zaventem International airport and Maelbeek metro station in Brussels on Tuesday.

    The attacks come four days after Salah Abdeslam, the main suspect in the jihadist terror attack in Paris on Nov. 13 last year, was arrested in the Molenbeek area of the Belgian capital.

    Brian Nussbaum, expert on terrorism and Richard Lachmann, a political sociologist at Rockefeller College in New York, give Metro their opinions on the devastating attacks.

  • T-Mobile Now Exempting Porn From Its Usage Caps

    Date published: 
    March 22, 2016

    "Critics like the EFF and Stanford Professor Barbara van Schewick argue that the program violates net neutrality by putting some companies (and now some porn providers) at a distinct disadvantage, but T-Mobile have countered by arguing that consumers (and now content partners) can opt out of the program at any time."

  • Should We Preemptively Ban Killer Robots Of The Future?

    Date published: 
    March 21, 2016

    "Paradoxically, the human factor is also cited by those in favor of the development of lethal autonomous weapons. "Robots aren't scared," Steve Groves, from the conservative U.S. think tank Heritage Foundation, told CBS last May. "They don't have fits of madness. They don't react to rage."

  • Apple 'privacy czars' grapple with internal conflicts over user data

    Date published: 
    March 21, 2016

    "Key principles include keeping customer data on their devices - rather than in the cloud, on Apple servers - and isolating various types of data so they cannot be united to form profiles of customers.

    Such privacy guidelines can cut against engineers' instincts to "collect all the data, because sometime down the road it may be useful," said Albert Gidari, director of privacy at Stanford University's Center for Internet and Society."

  • Apple showdown with FBI over terrorist’s iPhone reaches crucial stage

    Date published: 
    March 20, 2016

    “It is up to Congress to legislate this issue,” added Albert Gidari, privacy director at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society. “I expect we will see proposals soon enough.”

    As with the New York case, Pym’s ruling is expected to be a prelude to further maneuvering by Apple and the Justice Department. In fact, Stanford’s Gidari, citing the public posturing between the two sides, expects the FBI to try to force Apple to unlock the iPhone even if appeals are underway.

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