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  • Meet ‘Ross,’ the newly hired legal robot

    Date published: 
    May 16, 2016

    "A future where ROSS, or similar robot lawyers, is used across the country might not be too far away, according to Ryan Calo, a law professor and writer who focuses on the intersection of technology and law. “The use of complex software in the practice of law is commonplace — for instance, in managing discovery,” said Calo. “Watson is a tool — in law or medicine or another context — to assist professionals in making judgments. Eventually, I bet not using these systems will come to be viewed as antiquated and even irresponsible, like writing a brief on a typewriter.”'

  • Attorneys Joust Over Copyright Law's Legacy

    Date published: 
    May 13, 2016

    "Attorney Andrew Bridges with Fenwick & West said adjudication is the only fair way to handle accusations that can lead to being kicked off the Internet. 

    "Who decides who's an infringer? There's only one competent authority to decide who's an infringer and that's a court. 

    "Every motion picture studio and record label has been accused of copyright infringement at least three times. And I bet they would not like to have their Internet service terminated. 

  • The Feds Are Arming Themselves to Drive Drones Out of Airports

    Date published: 
    May 13, 2016

    "All of which begs the question, is this that big a deal? “We need to figure out what kind of danger drones actually prose,” says Ryan Calo, who specializes in law as it applies to robotics, at the University of Washington. “Is it enough to spend millions of dollars protecting against them at every airport?”"

  • How Should ‘Sextortion’ Be Punished?

    Date published: 
    May 11, 2016

    "“Law is our teacher. It educates us,” said Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and the author of Hate Crimes in Cyberspace. “It can help shape cultural attitudes even if there aren’t a thousand new cases brought.”"

  • Google: Payday Loans Are Too Harmful to Advertise

    Date published: 
    May 11, 2016

    "Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington, thinks that though this isn’t the first effort Google has made to curb what it deems dangerous advertising (even within the financial sector) it’s a substantial one that will have an effect for both consumers and payday lenders. “It’s one thing to have a bunch of lawmakers take a stand. It’s quite another to have the main search engine not carry ads,” Calo says. “It has a signaling function.

  • Tech groups want next president to emphasize cybersecurity

    Date published: 
    May 5, 2016

    "Andrew McLaughlin, former Obama administration deputy chief technology officer and now head of content organization at Medium, proposed in a tweet Tuesday night: “Trump’s win endangers GOP Senators. America’s tech community should rally to defeat Richard Burr, for his idiotic war on Internet security.” (Burr tweeted support for Trump on Wednesday.)

  • Will artificial intelligence revolutionize cybersecurity?

    Date published: 
    May 4, 2016

    ""Just imagine a world in which bots are out there looking for vulnerabilities and other bots or artificial intelligence is simultaneously poking holes, plugging holes, poking back," said Ryan Calo, a law professor and director of the Tech Policy Lab at the University of Washington, a think tank that examines cybersecurity and AI policy."

  • Woman forced to unlock her iPhone using her fingerprint in unprecedented move that has divided legal experts

    Date published: 
    May 4, 2016

    "However, Albert Gidari, director of privacy at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, said the order does not appear to violate the Fifth Amendment as courts traditionally interpret it.

    He said: 'Unlike disclosing passcodes, you are not compelled to speak or say what's "in your mind" to law enforcement. "Put your finger here" is not testimonial or self-incriminating.'"

     

  • Texting A Person While They’re Driving Could Land You In Jail

    Date published: 
    May 3, 2016

    "But Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor of law and engineering at the University of South Carolina, thinks the textalyzer bill, Gallatin v. Gargiulocase, and Snapchat suit might suggest an upcoming shift in how society takes on distracted driving. Smith was a transportation engineer before he studied law and he specializes in how emerging technology affects driving. “People often see distracted driving as a socially acceptable sin, a kind of inside joke writ large, an innocuous guilty pleasure in which everyone indulges,” Smith told Vocativ.

  • After Two Abandoned iPhone Cases, FBI’s Next Encryption Battle Unclear

    Date published: 
    May 2, 2016

    "Riana Pfefferkorn, the cryptography fellow at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society, believes the Justice Department will continue to pursue a multi-pronged strategy, pressing the encryption issue on lawmakers, in meetings with tech companies, and in the courts. But following San Bernardino and New York, it will mount litigation below the public’s radar.

  • CPJ alarmed by WhatsApp block in Brazil

    Date published: 
    May 2, 2016

    ""Journalists in Brazil regularly rely on WhatsApp for their reporting," said CPJ Technology Program Coordinator Geoffrey King. "Blocking access to such a widely used platform is an overreach that violates the open nature of the Internet and disproportionally damages the free flow of information.""

  • Who's Responsible When a Self-Driving Car Crashes?

    Date published: 
    May 1, 2016

    "Features such as Pilot Assist exist in what tech policy expert and University of South Carolina assistant professor Bryant Walker Smith calls the “mushy middle of automation,” where carmakers still require human drivers to pay attention. “It's not always clear where the line between the human and the machine falls,” he says.

    In the long run, “from the manufacturer's perspective,” Smith says, “what they may be looking at is a bigger slice of what we all hope will be a much smaller [liability] pie.”"
  • The government wants your fingerprint to unlock your phone. Should that be allowed?

    Date published: 
    April 30, 2016

    "But Albert Gidari, the director of privacy at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, said the action might not violate the 5th Amendment prohibition of self-incrimination.

    "Unlike disclosing passcodes, you are not compelled to speak or say what's 'in your mind' to law enforcement," Gidari said. "'Put your finger here' is not testimonial or self-incriminating.""

  • New Rules Mean It's Payback Time in Patent Cases

    Date published: 
    April 30, 2016

    ""There's no doubt that Octane Fitness has made a difference. It's increased the risk of bringing really frivolous litigation," Nazer said. "We don't know the extent to which these judgments are being collected on. At the end, there's a lot TBD.""

  • Why the names of six people who complained of sexual assault were published online by Dallas police

    Date published: 
    April 29, 2016

    "Balancing the desire for greater transparency and the need to protect the privacy of victims can be a difficult issue for the authorities. And some police departments may not have in-house expertise to know which data should be kept anonymous, said Arvind Narayanan, a computer science professor at Princeton who researches privacy issues.

    “Depending on what one is looking to release, it can be anywhere from easily doable to impossible,” said Narayanan."

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