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  • Why killer robots ‘must be stopped’

    Date published: 
    March 17, 2016

    The Campaign to Stop Killer Robots is an international coalition of 59 groups, including Human Rights Watch and the Nobel Women’s Committee.

    Spokesman Peter Asaro, an affiliate scholar at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, said an international treaty to ban the weapons was urgent.

    He told The New Daily killer robots would make it difficult to hold anyone accountable for war crimes and atrocities.

  • Tech tools contested weapons in «digital jihad»

    Date published: 
    March 17, 2016

    ""This is one of the harder questions that we will ever have to deal with," said Albert Gidari, director of privacy at Stanford Law School's Centre for Internet and Society.

    "How far are we going to go? Where does the government power end to collect all evidence that might exist, and whether it infringes on basic rights? There's no simple answer," he told dpa."

  • How Apple Helped Me Crack iPhones Like Clockwork

    Date published: 
    March 16, 2016

    "“The government is making the argument that the past is prologue” even though technology has changed, said Jeffrey Vagle, executive director of the Center for Technology, Innovation and Competition at the University of Pennsylvania Law School."

  • What Kind of Legal Rights Should Robots Have?

    Date published: 
    March 12, 2016

    "Robots. Are they people, too?

    Science fiction has long consider the legal rights of artificially intelligent beings. But as robots become an increasing presence in our societies and industries, questions about the role of robots in legal decisions, how laws are applied to robots, and the concept of “robot law” itself have begun to emerge.

  • Some self-driving cars see green light, others get a yield

    Date published: 
    March 12, 2016

    ""The devil is in the details, and once you go deeper, you discover these weird legal details you never would have guessed," says Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina, who focuses on the development of laws and regulations concerning self-driving cars. "The broader social context will shape how those are interpreted. It can mean different things if we really like the technology or if we're really afraid of the technology. We're about to see that play out.""

  • Car Makers Test Technology to Make You Pay Attention to the Road

    Date published: 
    March 11, 2016

    "But driver assistance features increasingly are playing a role, suggesting AI is being employed to fix a problem created by automation. Radar-enhanced cruise control and lane keeping technology that maintain set distance between vehicles or alert a driver to drift often are sold as safety features, but they can make drivers less attentive, saidBryant Walker Smith, a law professor at University of South Carolina who researches liability issues associated with autonomous vehicles.

  • FCC outlines proposal for regulating broadband providers' privacy practices

    Date published: 
    March 10, 2016

    "Omer Tene, Vice President of Research and Education at the policy-neutral International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), acknowledged in an interview with SCMagazine.com that there is an inherent risk in shifting authority to a new agency because “you lose the guidelines and the standards that the FTC has set forth,” including “more than 150 enforcement actions.”

  • Apple Might Be Forced To Reveal & Share iPhone Unlocking Code Widely

    Date published: 
    March 9, 2016

    "n addition, defense counsel would undoubtedly demand the right for their own third-party experts to have access not only to the source code, but to further demand the right to simulate the testing environment and run this code on their own systems in order to confirm the veracity of evidence.

  • Biometrics Are Coming, Along With Serious Security Concerns

    Date published: 
    March 9, 2016

    "Just because someone might be able to use their ear at checkout doesn’t mean it’s necessarily going to happen anytime soon, though. “Biometrics are tricky,” Woodrow Hartzog, an Associate Professor of Law at Samford University told WIRED. “They can be great because they are really secure. It’s hard to fake someone’s ear, eye, gait, or other things that make an individual uniquely identifiable. But if a biometric is compromised, you’re done. You can’t get another ear.”

  • The Shame Game

    Date published: 
    March 9, 2016

    "That doesn’t mean shaming will always have the intended effect. There’s always a chance the public won’t latch onto a given case. And even if officials wanted to maximize the amount of shame, they don’t always know how to leverage social media and PR to rack up millions of views. However, unlike public shaming spurred on by private, often anonymous, individuals, shaming that’s sanctioned by law enforcement has “a whole other imprimatur of credibility,” said Danielle Citron, a University of Maryland law professor who studies online harassment.

  • The land that kills its tinkers

    Date published: 
    March 8, 2016

    "While some proponents of both have laudable goals–protecting the intellectual property of innovators and building intelligence that can save lives–the dangers posed by each are significant.

    Technologists have warned about both at length. Jennifer Granick, for example, described in excellent detail the risk of creating a world in which black boxes make life-and-death decisions that cannot be reliably audited. Apple and others have described the risk of backdoor exploits being obtained and abused by criminals.

  • As Apple vs. FBI deepens, tech companies face these nuclear options

    Date published: 
    March 8, 2016

    "Andrea Matwyshyn, a scholar at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society and a professor at Boston's Northeastern University School of Law, said on the phone that "picking a fight with the crown jewel of our economy" may push some companies to reconsider their domestic growth in favor of investing their overseas operations where the legal landscape may be more hospitable.

  • At Supreme Court, Debate Over Phone Privacy Has A Long History

    Date published: 
    March 8, 2016

    ""The justices had phones [by 1967], and they knew that they talked about their most private stuff on those phones," says Jennifer Stisa Granick, director of civil liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. "So a case that considered warrantless wiretapping looks a lot different. ... And I think that same exact dynamic is happening here.""

  • Feds: New judge must force iPhone unlock, overturning ruling that favored Apple

    Date published: 
    March 7, 2016

    ""Judge Orenstein ruled the FBI’s request would 'thoroughly undermine fundamental principles of the Constitution’ and we agree," an Apple spokesman told Ars in a statement. "We share the judge’s concern that misuse of the All Writs Act would start us down a slippery slope that threatens everyone’s safety and privacy."

    The New York case, however, marks the first time that a federal judge has ruled in favor of a more privacy-minded Apple. More recent amicus, or friend of the court briefs, supporting Apple, have cited Judge Orenstein’s ruling.

  • The fight against 'revenge porn'

    Date published: 
    March 7, 2016

    "We know that one photo can ruin your career,” said Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and author of the book “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace.” Citron believes there’s a need for these revenge porn laws, given the inadequacy of most states’ harassment laws to encompass this behavior."

  • Sacramento-area investigators want iPhones unlocked

    Date published: 
    March 6, 2016

    "“Part of the conversation is whether the FBI has sufficient training and access to technology (to do its job). Asking the private sector to help is not the most efficient fulfillment of its law enforcement duties,” said Andrea Matwyshyn, a scholar at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society and a professor at Boston’s Northeastern University School of Law.

  • MIT Bitcoin Expo Day One Focuses on Technology

    Date published: 
    March 6, 2016

    "After lunch, Princeton University's Arvind Narayanan took the stage, drawing parallels between the histories of gold mining and telephone line installation and Bitcoin, and encouraging closer collaboration with academia and the Bitcoin community. He also discussed a paper he wrote at Princeton that concluded "only 28 out of nearly 200,000 websites registered with NameCoin led to non-trivial websites" at the time of publication."

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