Press

CIS in the news.

Leave blank for all. Otherwise, the first selected term will be the default instead of "Any".
  • In an apparent first, Dallas police used a robot to deliver bomb that killed shooting suspect

    Date published: 
    July 8, 2016

    "The way the robot was used in the Dallas case is likely legally no different from sending an officer in to shoot a hostile suspect, according to University of Washington law professor Ryan Calo.

    Still, the Dallas Police Department's decision to use the unit in this way could have a major effect on how the public views the increasing integration of robots into daily life, he said.

  • Bomb Robots: What Makes Killing In Dallas Different And What Happens Next?

    Date published: 
    July 8, 2016

    ""Given how many police [departments] have robots and given how versatile they are and the various uses to which they've been put, including in hostage situations, I think we'll find that there have been other examples of this," says Ryan Calo, a professor at the University of Washington School of Law who studies robotics and cyberlaw. "As far as I know, this is a first time that they've used a robot to intentionally kill someone."

  • Dallas police used a robot to kill a gunman, a new tactic that raises ethical questions

    Date published: 
    July 8, 2016

    "As police departments acquire more robots that were once seen only in war zones, civilian law enforcement officers are pushing into territory forged by the CIA and the U.S. Air Force to kill terrorists, said Ryan Calo, an assistant law professor at the University of Washington in Seattle and an expert on robotics and the law.   

    “This is not the beginning of killer robotics, domestically, but it is hard to distinguish this and a drone strike,” Calo said. “The police had exhausted their other options, they thought.”

  • When Can Police Use a ‘Bomb Robot’ to Kill a Suspect?

    Date published: 
    July 8, 2016

    "“The situation definitely raises interesting questions,” said Peter Asaro, an assistant professor at the New School for Public Engagement in New York City and a co-founder of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control. “Who was controlling the bomb? Who was controlling the robot?”"

  • When Police Use Robots to Kill People

    Date published: 
    July 8, 2016

    "While the Dallas event is also an outlier, the worry is that it could be a harbinger. "I hope they don’t start designing a whole series of police-armed robots," said Peter Asaro, who studies the ethical implications of military robotics and drones at The New School. "Once it becomes standard practice, it’ll be used in other instances that aren’t as cut and dry as this one.""

  • DALLAS: Using remote-controlled robot to kill suspect may be a first

    Date published: 
    July 8, 2016

    "But Peter Asaro, an assistant professor at the New School in New York City and a co-founder of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control, wondered why, if Dallas police could detonate a bomb, they couldn’t have set off a tear gas canister attached to the robot instead.

    “There are number of critical questions,” among them whether the perceived militarization of police is appropriate, Asaro said.

  • When will we get driverless cars? Experts say public opinion is the critical factor

    Date published: 
    July 7, 2016

    ""A tragedy tends to focus discussion in a way that a broader speculation cannot," Bryant Walker Smith said. The tragedy he was referring to was therecent fatality that occurred in a Tesla Model S that was operating in Autopilot mode. When neither the driver, Joshua Brown, nor Autopilot—an autonomous driving feature—failed to brake, the car crashed into a tractor trailer, killing the driver.

  • Someone is watching your Uber driver

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2016

    "“With each degree of greater control that is exercised over the driver, Uber may find itself traveling down a path where a court might say there is an inadequate buffer of keeping these drivers independent contractors,” said Andrea Matwyshyn, a professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University."

  • Court ruling in child-porn case stirs privacy fears

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2016

    "“This is the opinion of one court judge,” said Andrea Matwyshyn, a law professor at Northeastern University. “Other courts will, at best, find this to be data. It is information about the way that one court ruled in a particular set of facts. And other courts may choose not to analyze similar facts.”"

  • EU citizens might get a ‘right to explanation’ about the decisions algorithms make

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2016

    "While the new provision may seem great at first glance, the word “solely” makes the situation a little more slippery, says Ryan Calo, a University of Washington law professor who focuses on technology. Calo explained over email how companies that use algorithms could pretty easily sidestep the new regulation.

    “All a firm needs to do is introduce a human—any human, however poorly trained or informed—somewhere in the system,” Calo said. “[V]oila, the firm is no longer basing their decision ‘solely on automated processing.'”

  • Tesla Autopilot death highlights autonomous risks

    Date published: 
    July 1, 2016

    ""The reality is that the public and regulators won't tolerate that kind of risk-taking even if over 50 years it means more people are saved," said Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law who has studied the legal and ethical ramifications of this technology for years."

  • Tesla Crash Could Hurt Industry

    Date published: 
    July 1, 2016

    ""For years people have been saying the technology is ready, and it's one of my pet peeves, because no it's not," said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and an expert on autonomous driving issues."

  • Traffic deaths climb 7.7% in 2015 to the highest toll since 2008

    Date published: 
    July 1, 2016

    ""Fatalities increased much more than vehicle miles traveled," said Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina who has studied traffic safety and new technology. "Anecdotal evidence suggests that drivers are increasingly distracted and dangerous. At some point, we need to decide whether we will actually treat distracted and aggressive driving as a socially unacceptable behavior on par with its risk.""

  • Experts: Tesla could be liable in fatal autopilot crash

    Date published: 
    July 1, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor with the school of law at the University of South Carolina who specializes in autonomous vehicle regulations, said it could be argued the notifications with Autopilot aren’t sufficient.

    “The fact that Tesla recognized and warned of misuse does not give it a get-out-of-liability-free card,” he said. “Lots of claims can be made about design of the system, level of supervision of the user and interaction.”" 

  • Man arrested after Twitter threats are made against U.S. senators

    Date published: 
    June 29, 2016

    "“The accused in this case could (and may well) raise . . . First Amendment challenges” to the Twitter ban, Scott Shackelford, a professor of cybersecurity law at Indiana University said in an email. But, he added, “the threatening nature of the Tweets in question” could be used to justify the ban."

Pages