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CIS in the news.

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  • Expert: Texas, self-driving cars may mesh well

    Date published: 
    October 7, 2015

    "Bryant Walker Smith, an associate professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law who has studied self-driving vehicle implications, said Texas not adopting any self-driving regulations may give operators like Google freedom to test.

    Austin itself can provide a good space for testing as a mixture of urban and suburban environments, he said.

    In some cases, Smith said, there might be laws only against reckless driving, so companies such as Google could test self-driving cars without having anyone in the driver's seat."

  • E.U.'s Sudden Shift on Data Is a Big Headache for Small Marketers

    Date published: 
    October 7, 2015

    ""The big companies have probably been gearing up for this for some time, but for smaller companies, this is, I think, a much greater challenge because they don't have the legal sources in house," said Omer Tene, VP-research and education at the International Association of Privacy Professionals.

  • What Digicel's Next-Level Ad-Blocking Means for Adland

    Date published: 
    October 5, 2015

    ""The FCC has a no-blocking rule," said Marvin Ammori, a First Amendment lawyer and an affiliate scholar at the Stanford Law School Center for Internet & Society, in an email. "You can't block lawful content, and ads are lawful, and an ISP cannot require a fee merely to deliver traffic. The user, not the ISP (or payment from big advertisers), should determine what content he or she receives.""

  • How our love affair with ad-blocking risks giving Internet providers even more power

    Date published: 
    October 1, 2015

    "What Digicel is doing — turning ad-blocking on by default, and charging advertisers a fee to get through the filter — might fly in the Caribbean countries where it operates. But it's less clear that it would work in the United States, said Marvin Ammori, a net neutrality lawyer and activist.

    "While not everyone loves ads, having carriers act as toll-booths for ads doesn't further user-choice, and would clearly violate our rules," said Ammori."

  • The Download on the U.S.-China Cyber Espionage Agreement

    Date published: 
    September 30, 2015

    "However, deLisle and Jeffrey Vagle, lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and executive director of its Center for Technology, Innovation and Competition, were skeptical about the agreement’s effectiveness. “It’s a gentleman’s agreement,” said Vagle, noting that it is not a treaty or a legally binding agreement.

  • The global struggle to prevent cyberwar

    Date published: 
    September 30, 2015

    "“They’re more the death-by-a-thousand cuts thing in terms of crime and espionage,” said Scott Shackelford, an assistant professor of business law at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business.

  • Entrepreneurs Explore Bitcoin's Future

    Date published: 
    September 30, 2015

    "It is difficult for society to work out a legal framework to differentiate between good and bad uses of this technology, says Arvind Narayanan, a computer scientist at Princeton University in New Jersey. “How do you regulate around Bitcoin without banning the technology itself?” he asks.

  • Coding the New 'Schoolhouse Rock'

    Date published: 
    September 29, 2015

    On a hot summer day in Meridian Hill Park, looking out over Washington, D.C., Harlan Yu is dressed in a green cotton T-shirt, blue shorts and oxford-style sneakers. Sporting a scruffy goatee, Yu, who has biked to meet me, looks nothing like the suited men and women traipsing around doing the business of governing, policymaking, lobbying and otherwise plotting the affairs of our nation.

  • Net neutrality could become the biggest face-off on corporate speech since Citizens United

    Date published: 
    September 28, 2015

    "Others are challenging the idea that Internet providers are even capable of speech. As pipes that carry consumers' Web traffic to and fro, Internet providers are just a "conduit" for people's speech, according to a group of academics including Harvard's Lawrence Lessig and Yochai Benkler, and Stanford's Barbara van Schewick.

    "It follows that when the Open Internet Rules require providers to carry others’ speech, they do not require the providers themselves to speak," they argue in their own brief.

  • Intelligent Machines: Do we really need to fear AI?

    Date published: 
    September 28, 2015

    "Picture the scenario - a sentient machine is "living" in the US in the year 2050 and starts browsing through the US constitution.

    Having read it, it decides that it wants the opportunity to vote.

    Oh, and it also wants the right to procreate. Pretty basic human rights that it feels it should have now it has human-level intelligence.

    "Do you give it the right to vote or the right to procreate because you can't do both?" asks Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington.

  • Drones vs. driverless cars: A tale of two robotics policies

    Date published: 
    September 24, 2015

    "“As a consequence, the rules were really good for Google, because they did exactly what Google wanted them to do,” said Ryan Calo, a robotics professor at the University of Washington.

    But the regulations might also lead to future complications for driverless car companies as technology advances beyond existing laws, said University of South Carolina law professor Bryant Walker Smith.

    “Google’s self-driving team may, in some ways, have buyer’s remorse for pursuing legislation so early,” said Walker Smith."

  • The iPhone is Making Encryption Trendy, But Is There A Catch?

    Date published: 
    September 24, 2015

    ""Encryption will seriously interfere with the ability to routinely intercept communication, as our national intelligence seems to be doing domestically," says Ryan Calo, who studies law and emerging technology at the University of Washington. "It's been designed, tested with usability in mind, by people with three letters after their name. It's usable, and mainstream. People don't feel weird about using it."

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