Press

CIS in the news.

  • What will the Data Breach Landscape Look Like in 2017?

    Date published: 
    December 4, 2016

    "Omer Tene, Vice President of Research and Education for International Association of Privacy Professionals, added “Clearly, the biggest challenge for businesses in 2017 will be preparing for the entry into force of the GDPR, a massive regulatory framework with implications for budget and staff, carrying stiff fines and penalties in an unprecedented amount.”

  • Lawyers: New court software is so awful it’s getting people wrongly arrested

    Date published: 
    December 2, 2016

    "Elizabeth Joh, a criminal law professor at the University of California, Davis, told Ars that this situation was alarming. “Errors do occur in the criminal justice system, but in the past only people were to blame,” she e-mailed. “How do you blame software, and who is responsible? These kinds of systemic technology problems pose a real challenge to individual criminal defendants, who may sometimes not be aware of the source of the error—and it looks like Tyler Technologies is rejecting any responsibility.”"

  • How Algorithms Can Bring Down Minorities' Credit Scores

    Date published: 
    December 2, 2016

    "Preventing algorithmic discrimination is a challenge. It’s not easy to hold companies to the laws that would protect consumers from unfair credit practices, says Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland. “We don’t have hard and fast rules. It’s the Wild West in some respects.”"

  • Are Blockchain Patents a Bad Idea?

    Date published: 
    December 1, 2016

    "Daniel Nazer, a lawyer with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, told Fortune that applications to patent the blockchain — which is a form of software — face a high hurdle due to a Supreme Court case called Alice. That decision ruled that most, or perhaps all, software patents are abstract ideas that are ineligible for patent protection.

  • Some pervert cyberflashed me on the subway—And I have my iPhone to thank

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2016

    "Flashing someone is illegal, but the cyber equivalent isn’t, said Danielle Citron, a professor of law at the University of Maryland, who has written a book on cyberstalking.

    In order for what happened to me to be considered a crime—harassment—it would have to be “repeated and persistent,” according to Citron. A standard that two lewd pics probably doesn’t meet.

  • Alleged Kidnapping Raises Questions About Online Harassment

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2016

    ""We often see people who torment domestic partners will torment them and terrorize them with any tool they have, and that is on and offline," University of Maryland Professor of Law Danielle Citron told ATTN:. "It’s devastating but I’m not surprised."

    "The truth about threats is they have to be targeted at a specific person, or clear from the context that it’s targeted at a specific person and implying and suggesting that physical violence is next," Citron said.

  • Congress Is About to Expand Government Hacking Powers

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2016

    "Woodrow Hartzog, a law professor at Samford University who specializes in privacy law, says the history of computer crime law shows that vague language can lead to unintended consequences as technology evolves. “Even slight vagaries or miscalculations can result in dramatic expansions of power,” he says, citing language in the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, passed in 1986, that has created “an incredible amount of confusion” over what constitutes a crime.

  • 'A classic commons problem': Publishers are going notifications crazy

    Date published: 
    November 29, 2016

    "Publishers have quickly realized the power of mobile notifications in drawing people back to content, so naturally they’re at risk of overdoing it.

    “This is a classic commons problem,” said Andrew McLaughlin, a former partner at Betaworks. “It’s a space where if everybody behaves badly, everything gets trashed.”"

  • Donald Trump’s surveillance state: All the tools to suppress dissent and kill free speech are already in place

    Date published: 
    November 27, 2016

    "“Surveillance powers have a history of abuse in totalitarian societies,” Neil Richards, a law professor at Washington University in St. Louis, told Salon. “They also have a long history of abuse in the United States, from wiretapping to new forms of digital surveillance.”

    Richards also explained that American agencies have created files on dissidents and used their power to disrupt political expression.

  • How to Fix Silicon Valley’s Sexist Algorithms

    Date published: 
    November 23, 2016

    "But not everyone believes gender bias should be eliminated from the data sets. Arvind Narayanan, an assistant professor of computer science at Princeton, has also analyzed word embedding and found gender, racial, and other prejudices. But Narayanan cautions against removing bias automatically, arguing that it could skew a computer’s representation of the real world and make it less adept at making predictions or analyzing data.

  • Area colleges advance their cyber programs

    Date published: 
    November 22, 2016

    "“They are coming to the University of Maryland, Baltimore County for promotion potential and they want to brush up on their knowledge, their professional skills and advance their career,” said UMBC director of cyber security graduate program, Dr. Richard Forno. “Not many of my students are looking to break into the field out of the blue. They are already in the field doing something with cyber but we are seeing more younger students, recent college graduates who want to continue in their education and move into cyber. That demographic is shifting a little bit.

  • Boston becomes latest city for driverless car tests, in partnership with nuTonomy

    Date published: 
    November 21, 2016

    "There are still no official plans for the public to test nuTonomy's vehicles in Boston. The cars will still be supervised by a "research driver," so they are far from "driverless," said Bryant Walker Smith, professor at the University of South Carolina, and an expert on the legal aspects of self-driving vehicles. And testing on public roads has been happening for years—Google has been doing it since 2009.

  • Who is Responsible for Autonomous Weapons?

    Date published: 
    November 21, 2016

    "Peter Asaro, a philosopher of science, technology, and media at The New School in New York City, has been working on addressing these fundamental questions of responsibility and liability with all autonomous systems, not just weapons. By exploring fundamental concepts of autonomy, agency, and liability, he intends to develop legal approaches for regulating the use of autonomous systems and the harm they cause.

  • Fake News, Hate Speech and Social Media Abuse: What’s the Solution?

    Date published: 
    November 21, 2016

    "Underpinning the moves by the social media companies is a law (section 230 of the Communications Decency Act) that that gives them “a modicum of legal protection for the content that exists on their platforms, as long as they don’t veer off too much into editorial functions,” said Andrea Matwyshyn, law professor at Northeastern University and affiliate scholar at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School.

  • Rise of the drones: from policing the streets to painting your house

    Date published: 
    November 19, 2016

    "Such is the hype. But for every tech company with its head in the clouds, there are problems to bring them back down to earth. “There are big technical challenges,” says Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington. “There’s a bunch of PhD theses that need to be completed before you can build a drone to autonomously police an area, find intruders, and use facial recognition to know who is meant to be there. Plus, having these things stay aloft beyond a few minutes is non-trivial.”"

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