Press

CIS in the news.

  • IBM Gives Up Out-Of-Office Email Patent EFF Called 'Stupid'

    Date published: 
    March 2, 2017

    "Speaking by phone to Law360, Nazer said Thursday he believed the disclaimer was directly linked to his post given the timing, and the fact that IBM filed the disclaimer after it was contacted by other media outlets.

    “They file hundreds of other patents, so I guess they figured they could head off any criticism at the pass by dedicating it to the public," Nazer said."

  • Waymo's Uber Lawsuit May Be Start Of A Google Patent War

    Date published: 
    March 1, 2017

    "“I’ve been warning that we could eventually see automated driving patent wars that rival the smartphone patent wars from several years ago,” Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and research scholar at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, told Forbes. “Everybody is going to be infringing everybody’s patents eventually.”"

  • Twitter to police abuse in major shift

    Date published: 
    March 1, 2017

    ""Twitter has been proceeding carefully and thoughtfully in thinking through and rolling out tools designed to help harassment victims," said University of Maryland law professor Danielle Citron, who advises Twitter on these issues. "Those tools aim to put victims in the driver's seat but also tackle how overwhelming it can be when attacked by a cyber mob.The newest tool helps ensure that a harasser's provocations of others don't fill up victims' notifications.""

  • Our Bots, Ourselves

    Date published: 
    February 28, 2017

    "According to university law professors Woodrow Hartzog and Danielle Citron, “It is the first such complaint by the FTC that involved bots designed to actively deceive consumers.” It’s one thing to create a Twitter chatbot that acquires hundreds of followers who might not know it isn’t a real person. It’s quite another to maliciously program a bot to commit a crime."

  • Checks and balances: an uncertain future for the intelligence sector

    Date published: 
    February 28, 2017

    "According to Richard Forno, a professor at UMBC and the director of UMBC’s graduate cybersecurity program, “Politics should never interfere with intelligence operations or analysis. Ever. Intelligence needs to remain objective and provide useful, reality-based understanding of the world to our national leaders. Anything that abuses those treasured national assets, resources, or capabilities to serve domestic political agendas likely will adversely impact national security decision making and ultimately, national security.”"

  • Is Posting on Facebook a Fundamental Right?

    Date published: 
    February 28, 2017

    "“That’s of importance to anyone who uses the internet and digital products and services,” says Neil Richards, a Washington University law professor who specializes in privacy and First Amendment theory.

    Richards, for one, anticipates the latter. “I don’t think it’ll do much more than correct an error,” he says. “The court doesn’t want to set precedent for other cases unexpectedly without having those facts in front of it.”"
  • The Startup That’s in Charge of the Biggest Private Satellite Fleet

    Date published: 
    February 28, 2017

    "The higher resolution will likely raise privacy and security concerns, however, just as Google’s Street View did in its early days. Making public precise data on the locations of cell towers, nuclear power plants, or valuable antiquities, for instance, could pose obvious security risks. Albert Gidari, director of privacy at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, predicts that Planet Labs will eventually need clear mechanisms for handling complaints and requests to blur or delete images.

  • ICANN Is Moving Toward Copyright Enforcement, Academic Says

    Date published: 
    February 28, 2017

    "The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is on an “ambivalent drift” into online content regulation through its contractual facilitation of a “trusted notifier” copyright enforcement program between the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) and the registry operators for two new generic top-level domains, University of Idaho College of Law Professor Annemarie Bridy says in a draft article for the Washington & Lee Law Review."

  • If You're Not Driving, Then You Shouldn't be Liable for Accidents in Self-Driving Cars

    Date published: 
    February 27, 2017

    "In his new law review article, "Automated Driving and Product Liability," University of South Carolina law professor Bryant Walker Smith foresees a "shift from a compensation regime for conventional driving that is largely premised on vehicular negligence to a compensation regime for automated driving that increasingly implicates product liability." Since the "driver" of the vehicle will be the software and hardware installed by the manufacturer, Smith argues that automakers will be held liable in the case of acc

  • How Long Can Border Agents Keep Your Email Password?

    Date published: 
    February 27, 2017

    "“Based on the policy and reported incidents, my best guess is that CBP agents have broad discretion to keep login credentials if they think they will have a reason to use them in the future,” said Catherine Crump, a law professor at the University of California, Berkeley who has brought multiple cases against the government’s digital border search policy. “Bottom line: Change your passwords, people!”"

  • Waymo's Fight With Uber Might Be the First Shot in a Self-Driving Car IP War

    Date published: 
    February 24, 2017

    "“For years I’ve warned about a potential automated driving patent war that could rival the notorious smartphone patent war,” says Bryant Walker-Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and an expert in self-driving regulations. As autonomous vehicles transition from amusing gimmicks to money-making products, who controls the key intellectual property could determine which companies thrive and which fall by the wayside."

  • Waymo sues Uber for allegedly stealing self-driving secrets

    Date published: 
    February 23, 2017

    "Since Waymo is alleging intentional patent infringement (among other claims), if it prevails, it could win triple damages, as well as other relief, said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and an expert in self-driving cars.

    The outbreak of a patent war in the nascent field of autonomous vehicles is not surprising, and could eclipse the earlier smartphone patent war, Smith said.

  • Ford wants your new car to pick a song – or tell a joke

    Date published: 
    February 22, 2017

    "Systems like those Ford is researching will become far more vital as auto companies develop autonomous cars, said Bryant Walker Smith, an engineering professor at the University of South Carolina who focuses on the legal aspects of such advanced technology.

    “If you’re going to step it up, an almost necessary part of this requires monitoring the human to make sure they’re monitoring the vehicle,” he said."

  • How Peter Thiel's Palantir Helped the NSA Spy on the Whole World

    Date published: 
    February 22, 2017

    "The former PCAP member who did respond, Stanford privacy scholar Omer Tene, told The Intercept that he was unaware of “any specific relationship, agreement, or project that you’re referring to,” and said he was not permitted to answer whether Palantir’s work with the intelligence community was ever a source of tension with the PCAP. He declined to comment on either the NSA or GCHQ specifically.

  • How a College Kid Made His Honda Civic Self-Driving for $700

    Date published: 
    February 21, 2017

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina, says that federal and state laws probably don’t pose much of a barrier to those with a desire to upgrade their vehicle to share driving duties. NHTSA has authority over companies selling vehicles and systems used to modify them, but consumers have significant flexibility in making changes to their own vehicle, says Smith, who advises the U.S. Department of Transportation on law and automation."

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