Press

CIS in the news.

  • In the race for drone delivery, the U.K. is way ahead of the U.S.

    Date published: 
    October 3, 2016

    "“I think people forget how lucky the U.S. got with the internet,” said Ryan Calo, a technology law professor at the University of Washington.

    The reason why all the most popular internet companies are American, says Calo, has as much to do with these early rules of the road as it does with the fact that the internet was invented in the U.S."

  • How the Legacy of Slavery Is Very Much Still with U.S.

    Date published: 
    October 3, 2016

    "AMY GOODMAN: On Saturday, just before I sat down with Ava DuVernay, I sat down with two of the people featured in the film. Among those who are in the film, Michelle Alexander, Angela Davis—Common writes the music—but Malkia Cyril of the Center for Media Justice and Kevin Gannon of Grand View University in Iowa. I started by asking Malkia what she wanted the film to convey.

  • Researchers ask federal court to unseal years of surveillance records

    Date published: 
    September 30, 2016

    "Two lawyers and legal researchers based at Stanford University have formally asked a federal court in San Francisco to unseal numerous records of surveillance-related cases, as a way to better understand how authorities seek such powers from judges. This courthouse is responsible for the entire Northern District of California, which includes the region where tech companies such as Twitter, Apple, and Google, are based.

  • Elon Musk, billionaire tech idealist and space entrepreneur

    Date published: 
    September 30, 2016

    "“Elon Musk is a great visionary and a great inventor, and you have to admire his ambition and his moxie,” says Patrick Lin, philosophy professor and head of the emerging sciences group at California Polytechnic. “But it does seem he has a blind spot for ethical issues and their impact.”

    Putting humans on Mars, he adds, could spread our shortcomings through the solar system: “It sounds like we’re going to be exporting our problems to another rock.”"

  • Researchers file for access to court orders that force companies to break their own encryption

    Date published: 
    September 30, 2016

    "The researchers are members of the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School and part of the organization’s Crypto Policy Project, a group established in 2015 to investigate the government policies “forcing decryption and/or influencing crypto-related design of online platforms and services, devices, and products, both via technical means and through the courts.”

  • Could a revenge porn case in Northern Ireland change Facebook across the planet?

    Date published: 
    September 28, 2016

    ""It is fairly easy for all these companies to figure out where all this data is coming from," Danielle Citron, who authored Hate Crimes in Cyberspace and has advised Facebook and Twitter on their harassment policies over the years, told Mashable. Figuring out where data comes from isn't an exact science, she said, but Facebook could develop different nude imagery policies for different regions, conceding to the Irish lawsuit while not stirring up a free speech controversy in the U.S."

     

  • The Gray Area of Driverless Car Regulation

    Date published: 
    September 28, 2016

    "The draft rules in California, where 15 companies are currently testing driverless vehicles, “will probably be either substantially reworked or superseded by new legislation,” predicted Bryant Walker Smith, a law and engineering professor from the University of South Carolina who writes about autonomous vehicle regulations at newlypossible.org. "

  • Federal judge in Pittsburgh cuts Kentucky computer hacker a break

    Date published: 
    September 27, 2016

    "Anecdotally, there are plenty of examples of people who commit cybercrimes in their youth who go on to become law-abiding citizens and even computer security experts, said Brian Nussbaum, a former security intelligence analyst who teaches computer security at State University of New York at Albany.

    “It has historically not been unusual for youthful indiscretions at the keyboard to lay the technical and intellectual foundations for careers in information technology and information security,” Nussbaum said.

  • Supreme Court Term Promises to Be IP Blockbuster

    Date published: 
    September 26, 2016

    "Universal, which is represented by Sidley Austin and Munger, Tolles & Olson, argues that a takedown notice doesn’t require a fair use assessment. It also argues that Lenz never had standing to bring her suit because her video was restored to YouTube long before she went to court. Lenz “seeks only a symbolic vindication of a bare statutory right,” Sidley’s Mark Haddad wrote in Universal’s petition.

  • Lawyer: 'Negligence' in bus crash that killed 4 from Rock Hill

    Date published: 
    September 24, 2016

    "Investigators with both federal and state governments, and likely insurance carriers and other private firms, will want to know whether the bus and the tires were properly maintained, said Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina law school professor who teaches civil law and an expert in transportation law. Investigators will want to know if there is any identifiable cause for the blowout, Smith said.

  • Government lawyers don’t understand the Internet. That’s a problem.

    Date published: 
    September 23, 2016

    "Some of today’s technical legal befuddlement stems from the fact that the field is so new. “No one who is practicing today had a cybersecurity class in law school,” explains Kristen Eichensehr, a UCLA law professor whose own cybersecurity course has doubled in the three years it’s been offered. “Everyone who has been in practice has had to learn this on the job.”"

  • Cities Fight Domestic Dragnet, Demand Local Police Disclose Use of Spy Gear

    Date published: 
    September 23, 2016

    ""In Ferguson, Baltimore, Chicago, New York, Oakland, South Carolina, Minneapolis, San Francisco, Baton Rouge and now Charlotte, amongst other cities, Black communities are dying at the hands of those they pay to serve and protect," said Malkia Cyril, executive director of the Center for Media Justice during a press call. "Officers that kill are placed on administrative leave. They're paid. They start 'Go Fund Me' pages to raise money [for themselves]. They're rarely charged, even more rarely indicted and even more rarely convicted.

  • Is Police Use of Force About to Get Worse—With Robots?

    Date published: 
    September 22, 2016

    "Ryan Calo, a professor at the University of Washington who’s a leading expert on the intersection of robots and law, said making law enforcement agencies draft policies about how and when they can use robots and drones forces them to think through scenarios in advance. “If you want to put a Taser on a drone and tase a mentally ill person,” Calo said, “or if you want to follow someone around with a drone, that’s where you need to have a process in place that you’ve properly vetted with the leadership.”"

     

  • Germany to create world’s first highway code for driverless cars

    Date published: 
    September 21, 2016

    "Driverless cars may end up being a form of public transport rather than vehicles you own, says Ryan Calo at Stanford University, California. That is happening in the UK and Singapore, where government-provided driverless “pods” are being launched.

    That would go down poorly in the US, however. “The idea that the government would take over driverless cars and treat them as a public good would get absolutely nowhere here,” says Calo."

Pages