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CIS in the news.

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  • These are the ways robots deceive us

    Date published: 
    September 18, 2015

    "“I think robots are awesome,” said Woodrow Hartzog, a scholar at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society who specializes in human-robot interactions. “They can be the next great tool for human flourishing, but they can also be programmed to be machines of deceit and manipulation.”

  • Ahmed Mohamed Shows Why Makers and Hackers Care So Much About “Freedom to Tinker”

    Date published: 
    September 16, 2015

    "At the Blackhat hacker conference in Las Vegas last month, keynote speaker Jennifer Granick, the director of civil liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society and a defense lawyer who frequently represents hackers, talked about Freedom to Tinker.” She concluded, “Today we’ve reached an inflection point. If we change paths, it is still possible that the Dream of Internet Freedom can become true.

  • Who Is Google’s Self-Driving Car CEO, and Where Is He Heading?

    Date published: 
    September 15, 2015

    "That’s roughly how its in-car dashboard system, Android Auto, operates now. However, running an OS for a full vehicle, with its wealth of safety features and parts made by disparate companies, may be too complicated, said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who studies the field. He expects Google to enter into specific licensing deals in the not-too-distant future with carmakers or fleets — providing self-driving software and gizmos, say, for a dealership or a delivery company.

  • Mom behind ‘Let’s Go Crazy’ YouTube video wins landmark copyright ruling

    Date published: 
    September 15, 2015

    "“Something's likely to be fair use when there's no way it’s going to be a market substitute for the original. Nobody is going to watch this video instead of buying a Prince record,” said Daniel Nazer.

    Nearly eight years after Lenz’s post, her case may be heading to trial.

    “We wanted to set a precedent that companies can't ignore,” said Nazer. “Hopefully it will make it less likely that people will take down your legal content.”"

  • Why Internet freedom may need saving

    Date published: 
    September 15, 2015

    "From open internet, Jennifer shifts gears to laws around internet security. She says, "There is software in everything, and if we're not allowed to study that, we're just going to be surrounded by black boxes that do things we cannot understand." 

  • FTC says data and privacy are top security concerns

    Date published: 
    September 14, 2015

    "Andrea Matwyshyn, professor of Law at Northeastern University and Microsoft Visiting Professor at Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy, said, “Security enables good functionality and consumer trust, but we need a regulatory scalpel, not a regulatory ax.”

    Regulations can ensure better quality, functionality, security, and privacy, but Matwyshyn warned, “Some regulation can be damaging. When we start to apply a heavier lens, we’re disrupting innovation.”

  • Experts to IoT makers: Bake in security

    Date published: 
    September 14, 2015

    "As sensors – a common category of IoT devices – become embedded in larger systems, such as cars, liability of the manufacturers looms larger, says Andrea Matwyshyn, a professor of law at Northeastern University. If software in IoT devices in cars is exploited to create catastrophic accidents, the liability disclaimers that software developers have been asserting for years may lose their bite, she says.

  • Experts: Consumer protections vital as Internet of Things expand

    Date published: 
    September 11, 2015

    "Washington policymakers also face a learning curve. Those seeking to protect consumers’ security and privacy when it comes to the Internet of Things must also be careful not to damage innovation by instating overly broad regulations, said Andrea Matwyshyn, a law professor at Northeastern University.

    “In this case, we need a regulatory scalpel, not a regulatory axe,” Ms. Matwyshyn said.

  • Marvin Ammori, Susan Crawford, Tim Wu

    Date published: 
    September 10, 2015

    This year, the obscure tech-politics debate over whether and how we pay to use the Internet leaped into the mainstream, attracting the voices of Silicon Valley’s top brass, a late-night comedian, millions of disgruntled broadband service consumers and the president. But net neutrality’s big moment was a long time coming, with a varied group of cyber law scholars each making a push for an open Internet.

  • Outed Ashley Madison users want to make stolen data legally toxic

    Date published: 
    September 9, 2015

    "“Are these sites exacerbating an already harmful situation. Yes,” said Woodrow Hartzog, a privacy law expert at Samford University. “But that doesn’t mean they should lose immunity.”

    Section 230, he said, still provides important protections that keep the internet the free, open place that it is. “Twisting” laws like stolen property to keep information offline, he said, threatens the internet ecosystem.

  • MIND THE GAP – But not our pay gap

    Date published: 
    September 3, 2015

    "This issue over robots replacing traditional occupations has been discussed amongst academics since the dawn of artificial intelligence, and will unlikely disappear but instead become a significant problem for companies and their employees alike as we progress further into the 21st Century. Ryan Calo, professor at University of Washington School of Law with an expertise in robotics, illustrates;

  • ‘Gone Girl’ Suspect Confesses to Reporter—As FBI Listens In

    Date published: 
    September 2, 2015

    "“I think it’s a good motion,” says Jennifer Granick, director of civil liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. “The officers manipulated his phone to send data to the dispatcher so they could collect it without a warrant.” But the fact that the phone was abandoned may weigh against Muller. “I think the easiest way for a judge to rule against the defendant will be because he left his cell phone at the scene.”"

  • Ashley Madison Hack Creates Ethical Conundrum For Researchers

    Date published: 
    September 2, 2015

    "Jennifer Granick, a law professor at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, said that the legal questions around the hack are still murky, but a few things are clear. Researchers using this data would not, she said, be guilty of any federal crime, because they are not involved in any way in the hack itself. She said a researcher who downloaded the data might theoretically run afoul of their state's statute on possession of stolen property.

  • As self-driving cars come to more states, regulators take a back seat

    Date published: 
    August 29, 2015

    "“Automated vehicles are probably legal,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina law professor whose research helped advance that interpretation. “That is the default assumption.”

    “Once you have specific legal frameworks implemented, then the rules become more onerous,” Smith said. “These [regulatory] regimes may not be necessary and are probably looking at the wrong things regardless. I think that has contributed to this shift to saying we don’t necessarily need this legislation.”"
  • As legacy media cuts back on FOIA, digital-only news outlets step in

    Date published: 
    August 25, 2015

    "BuzzFeed, which has also quietly ramped up its FOIA work, plans to get even more aggressive in the face of the record number of government denials, BuzzFeed Assistant General Counsel Nabiha Syed, who has been spearheading the news organization’s new approach to FOIA, told me. “We’ve noticed that agencies deny requests on questionable grounds or delay their responses unnecessarily, in no small part because they can get away with it.

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