Press

CIS in the news.

  • Justice Eludes 298 Killed in the Shoot-Down of Malaysia Air Flight 17

    Date published: 
    July 7, 2017

    "“They’ve got to keep the public pressure on because that is what finally made the Lockerbie case move forward—this glaring impunity,” said Beth Van Schaack, a professor at Stanford Law School and a former State Department official who has blogged about the MH17 case. “People kept the fight alive, and eventually they were able to take the case forward.” Justice in the aircraft incident, she said, “is a 10-year process, not a two-year process.”"

  • Trolling victim takes neo-Nazi website to court

    Date published: 
    July 7, 2017

    "US laws around hate on the internet date back to the earliest chat rooms and bulletin boards. By the '90s, they'd begun to address electronic harassment. But the laws were narrow and generally addressed a method, say harassment over the phone, rather than a broad range of intimidating behavior, says Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and author of the book "Hate Crimes in Cyberspace." And they aren't used often, she says.

  • 51 Times That the Aggregator Distractify Says Its Copyright Was Violated

    Date published: 
    July 6, 2017

    "Daniel Nazer, a staff attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, said facts and story concepts generally can’t be copyrighted. Short phrases like headlines or titles likely wouldn’t be subject to copyright, either, he said.

    “There’s only so many ways to say that someone used a Spotfiy playlist to break up with someone, and that fact is no more copyrightable than the fact that the president fired the F.B.I. director,” he said."
  • Chicago Schools to Students: Submit to Our Choices for Your Futures or No Diploma

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2017
    Hey, Chicago parents: Are you ready for a bunch of government officials to decide whether your teen has appropriate post-high-school plans?
     
    If you're not, too bad. Your city's school district is pushing forward with its plan to demand—as a requirement to graduate—that seniors prove to the school that they have a plan for the future. What's more, this plan has to match what school administrators think your kid's future should look like.
     
  • Flying Cars: Separating Hype From Real Potential

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2017

    "“There’s been discussion of VTOL systems which in many ways are simply helicopters, and as Uber describes it in the initial deployments there will be a pilot in the aircraft,” said Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina and an affiliate scholar at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society who teaches classes on the legal issues facing autonomous vehicles.

  • Facebook censorship bias detailed in internal documents

    Date published: 
    June 29, 2017

    "Facebook’s “noncommittal” response to the groups’ request last year prompted them to ask to meet with company representatives, but the company did not respond, said Malkia Cyril, executive director of the Center for Media Justice, in an email to SiliconBeat Thursday. Similarly, Facebook did not respond to a petition urging it to change its censorship policies, he said.

    “Now we know why,” Cyril said. “Racial discrimination is built into the structure of how they manage content, and it harms communities of color using the platform. It’s time for a change.”"
  • 3 Big Legal Department Takeaways From Google's Antitrust Penalty

    Date published: 
    June 28, 2017

    "University of California, Hastings College of the Law professor Ben Depoorter said the European Commission’s massive penalty is a unique case for a narrow set of charges.

    “I wouldn’t say it means a lot for the majority of technology companies,” Depoorter said. “This is a story about dominant positions and the abuse of dominance.”"
  • In terror fight, tech companies caught between US and European ideals

    Date published: 
    June 23, 2017

    "“It’s so easy to point to the need for internet companies to do more that that becomes a real rallying cry,” says Daphne Keller, the director of Intermediary Liability at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, and a former associate general counsel to Google. “In European lawmaking, they don’t have very good tech advice on what’s really possible.

  • Security experts warn lawmakers of election hacking risks

    Date published: 
    June 21, 2017

    "More than a hundred security researchers and computer science experts have warned in a letter to lawmakers that not enough is being done to ensure the integrity of state and federal elections.

    The letter, published Wednesday, argues many US states are "inadequately prepared" to respond to cybersecurity risks with upcoming elections."
     
    Affiliate Scholar Brian Nussbaum and Non-Residential Fellow Aleecia McDonald were signers. 
     
  • How Uber's toxic culture forced Kalanick out

    Date published: 
    June 21, 2017

    "All of these signals about Uber's culture matter. "Uber wants to court investors, employees, drivers, and riders," said Bryant Walker Smith, professor at the University of South Carolina and one of the leading experts on the legal aspects of self-driving cars. "Particularly for the first two, image and vision matter—and can be heavily influenced in fact and perception by a public-facing leader.""

  • Supreme Court Hints That Trump Can’t Legally Block You on Twitter

    Date published: 
    June 20, 2017

    ""It's to the credit of these companies that they have—without admitting it in court—taken the responsibility of the custodians of public debate," said Neil Richards, a law professor at Washington University in St. Louis who specializes in the First Amendment. "We have to decide if that's a question we want to have left to a publicly traded corporation.""

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