Press

CIS in the news.

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  • Trai first regulator in world to focus on differential pricing: Barbara van Schewick

    Date published: 
    February 22, 2016

    "Barbara van Schewick is the director of the Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society. Her research and papers on network neutrality shaped the US Federal Communications Commission's work and rulings on the issue. In a Skype interview with Kim Arora, she spoke about the latest Trai decision and net neutrality around the world.

    How would you compare the TRAI ruling in India with net neutrality legislations elsewhere in the world?

  • Apple’s Standoff with the FBI: Will Consumer Privacy Prevail?

    Date published: 
    February 22, 2016

    "According to Jeffrey Vagle, a lecturer in law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and executive director of the school’s Center for Technology, Innovation & Competition, the FBI’s request “seems innocuous.” It relates to one phone that didn’t even belong to the shooter but to his employer, and that employer has already granted the government access to search the phone, he noted.

  • Apple Ruling Poses Grave Danger to Investor's Privacy Rights

    Date published: 
    February 22, 2016

    "It has been reported that the Director of Civil Liberties at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, Jennifer Granick, said, “This is a new frontier. I know of no other statutory provision that would arguably create an obligation for device manufacturers to help out government.”"

  • Giving names to online harassment

    Date published: 
    February 21, 2016

    "Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland, has specialised in cyber law and advised social media companies on how to shape their policies on abuse or harassment. Describing the project as "incredibly important", she says it is particularly encouraging as a means to educate law enforcement.

    "The problem is people come to them, they're great with street crimes, but tracking down a poster is foreign to them. I'm not criticising them, but we need education."

  • iPhone clash: Apple may invoke free speech rights

    Date published: 
    February 20, 2016

    "Apple could argue that being required to create and provide specific computer code amounts to unlawful compelled speech, said Ms Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography fellow at Stanford University's Centre for Internet and Society.

    The order against Apple is novel because it compels the company to create a new forensic tool to use, not just turn over information in Apple's possession, Ms Pfefferkorn said."

  • Justice Dept. questions Apple's motives in refusing to help FBI

    Date published: 
    February 20, 2016

    ""In the court of public opinion, a dead terrorist whose phone might have connections to more terrorists is pretty attractive from the standpoint of prosecution, but the legal question is not made easier because of that," Ryan Calo, an assistant law professor at the University of Washington in Seattle and an expert on privacy law, said in a phone interview.

    No court has ruled on whether a tech company could be forced to find a way around its own security features, Calo said.

  • Apple likely to invoke free-speech rights in encryption fight

    Date published: 
    February 19, 2016

    "Apple could argue that being required to create and provide specific computer code amounts to unlawful compelled speech, said Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography fellow at Stanford University's Center for Internet and Society.

    The order against Apple is novel because it compels the company to create a new forensic tool to use, not just turn over information in Apple's possession, Pfefferkorn said. "I think there is a significant First Amendment concern," she said."

  • How has celebrity stalking changed since Erin Andrews peeper?

    Date published: 
    February 19, 2016

    "Professor Danielle Citron of the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School says that while the videos did spread pretty far and wide in 2008, if something similar were to happen eight years later in 2016, the fallout would be worse.

    "We have so many more tools of surveillance," Citron said. "There would probably be more tentacles and it would be harder to take [the videos] down."

  • This is Apple's Most Likely Game Plan for Fighting The FBI

    Date published: 
    February 19, 2016

    "Apple could argue that being required to create and provide specific computer code amounts to unlawful compelled speech, said Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography fellow at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society.

    The order against Apple is novel because it compels the company to create a new forensic tool to use, not just turn over information in Apple’s possession, Pfefferkorn said. “I think there is a significant First Amendment concern,” she said."

  • Apple reportedly enlists aid of free-speech attorneys in encryption battle

    Date published: 
    February 18, 2016

    "As for the potential of a free-speech argument, Reuters spoke with cryptology expert Riana Pfefferkorn, a fellow at Stanford University's Center for Internet and Society, who said Apple could assert the FBI's request for a software workaround as tantamount to unlawful compelled speech. Since Apple contends such forensics tools do not currently exist, it would be forced to write computer code specifically for that purpose, Pfefferkorn said."

  • SAN BERNARDINO SHOOTING: Apple opposes order to unlock shooter's iPhone

    Date published: 
    February 18, 2016

    "If Apple is forced to comply with the order, it could have unintended consequences for users of its devices, and could change international regard for cyber-security issues involving the American company, said Riana Pfefferkorn, a fellow at The Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School.

    "If Apple agrees to write a special code for the U.S. government, what about China and Russia and other countries? That could deal a policy blow to America's stance that we are distinct in this area," she said in a telephone interview.

  • Apple stands up for consumers. Alone

    Date published: 
    February 18, 2016

    "Technology consultant Richard Forno, a veteran in the security industry and one who has worked for the government as well, pointed out that while the FBI is demanding a backdoor, "the NSA director Admiral Mike Rogers has already stated publicly there is no need for such backdoors or law enforcement access, and that strong internet security features are more of a benefit than risk to society"."

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