Press

CIS in the news.

  • The Marvel Chairman, a Hate-Mail Feud and Claims of Stolen DNA

    Date published: 
    August 11, 2016

    "Change has come slowly despite warnings in the Boston University Law Review about how employers, a person in a romantic relationship or fans of celebrities might attempt to steal DNA and build genetic profiles of victims. "Everyone worries about digital privacy and hacking," says Elizabeth Joh, a professor at the UC Davis School of Law. "Surprisingly, there's little law on DNA collection, and in many ways, this is concerning because one can't change their genetic password if a theft happens.""

  • Our Fingerprints Are Portals Into Our Digital Lives — But the Laws Haven't Caught Up

    Date published: 
    August 10, 2016

    "First of all, there's the Fourth Amendment, which protects against unlawful search and seizure. The problem is, according to Yana Welinder, a nonresidential fellow at Stanford Center for Internet and Society and affiliate at Harvard's Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, courts don't know how to handle fingerprints. "Fourth Amendment protection is currently seriously out of touch with [the] latest technology," Welinder said. 

  • Editorial: Hacking into elections

    Date published: 
    August 7, 2016

    ""Interfering with the electoral and political process of countries is a classic tool of intelligence and foreign policy,” noted Richard Forno of the University of Maryland’s Center for Cybersecurity."

  • Government data requests have little legal backing say experts

    Date published: 
    August 5, 2016

    "The Stanford Center for Internet and Society's Jennifer Granick, director of civil liberties, and Riana Pfefferkorn, cryptography fellow, said at Black Hat 2016 that companies are often under no legal obligation to comply with law enforcement data requests, because data requests are not orders and even court orders are not the law.

  • Ferguson Improves Police Body Camera Policy, But Gaps Remain, Critics Say

    Date published: 
    August 5, 2016

    "Harlan Yu, a principal at Upturn, said Ferguson’s updated policy is an improvement over the one it assessed for its study, which came from a 2014 document obtained by theSt. Louis Post Dispatch.

    Yu still had several concerns about the new policy, including the city’s decision to allow officers to review footage before filing reports about contentious encounters and the lack of an explicit plan to delete footage after a certain period of time. 

     “It’s much more substantive than the initial version, but there are still significant gaps,” said Yu."

  • Stanford-Professorin Van Schewick: ‘Netzbetreiber gegen den Rest der Welt’

    Date published: 
    August 5, 2016

    "Sind wir im Internet alle gleich oder gibt es Privilegierte? Regiert auch hier das Geld die Welt? Die gebürtige Bonnerin und Stanford-Professorin Barbara van Schewick ist Expertin für Netzneutralität. Die amerikanischen Regulierungsbehörden haben ihre Vorschläge im vergangenen Jahr in Form von Netzneutralitätsregeln umgesetzt. Für van Schewick hat das Internet großes demokratisierendes Potenzial. In Europa sieht sie dies jetzt bedroht, wenn das Bewusstsein für das Thema nicht bei allen ankommt. Mit ihr sprach GA-Mitarbeiterin Anita Borhau-Karsten.

  • Who gets the blame when driverless cars crash? Everybody.

    Date published: 
    August 5, 2016

    "Law professor Bryant Walker Smith of the University of South Carolina discussed some of the legal aspects of getting driverless cars on the road. There are no major legal barriers to the use of the cars, he said, but there are minor issues in state law—for example, he said, the state of New York requires that drivers keep one hand on the wheel at all times. What happens when manufacturers introduce autonomous vehicles that don’t even have steering wheels?

  • When Law Enforcement Comes Knocking, Companies Can Start Fighting

    Date published: 
    August 4, 2016

    "Touching on cases like the Snowden or the Lavabit incidents, the duo strongly emphasized that companies should start asking themselves a couple of questions before law enforcement actually comes knocking at their door. Knowing what they collect, how they store it, for how long, why, what can it access, does it encrypt data and where are keys stored – are only a few of them.

  • The rise of police body cameras: Who's doing it right?

    Date published: 
    August 4, 2016

    "“There’s a real fear among many civil rights advocates and communities that body-worn cameras will become just another tool for surveillance,” Mr. Yu tells the Monitor by phone.

    A number of police departments have pushed back against the criteria for body camera policies outlined in the study, says Dr. Yu, including Fresno, Calif., a city which failed every one of the eight categories outlined in the report."

  • Sites Spying on You in Weird New Ways, Princeton Study Exposes

    Date published: 
    August 4, 2016

    ""Several features of the web...are being used or abused, depending on how one looks at it, by these tracking companies and various entities in the ad tech ecosystem," said study co-author Arvind Narayanan, an associate professor of computer science at Princeton. "They're being used in sneaky ways to track where users are going across the web.""

  • At Black Hat, a Reminder That Decryption Can’t Be Legally Mandated

    Date published: 
    August 4, 2016

    "“If you’re ever asked to do something like this, you have a lot of strong legal arguments to say no,” said Jennifer Granick, the Director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society in a Black Hat talk on Thursday. Granick and her Stanford colleague Riana Pfefferkorn, a Cryptography Fellow, ran down relevant laws and what’s currently known about their parameters and limits. They suggested that companies should plan ahead and assume that law enforcement agencies will eventually send them some kind of technical request—if they haven’t already.

  • Pittsburgh police release body-cam policy synopsis

    Date published: 
    August 3, 2016

    "Release of the synopsis was not enough to satisfy the Washington, D.C.-based Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and Upturn, a technology consultant, which Tuesday released a report that gave Pittsburgh low marks for its transparency on body-worn cameras. The groups said Pittsburgh was one of only three U.S. police departments of the 50 it surveyed whose policy could not be found in the public domain. The others were Detroit and Aurora, Colo.

  • Apple’s New Privacy Technology May Pressure Competitors to Better Protect Our Data

    Date published: 
    August 3, 2016

    "Arvind Narayanan, an assistant professor at Princeton University, is hopeful that Apple’s privacy stand will pressure other companies to follow suit. The popularity of Snapchat’s disappearing messages, and the occasional outcry when a company is caught doing something that looks unseemly, show that people do care about privacy, even if the tech industry provides few opportunities to express that, he says.

  • Activists give Boston’s body camera pilot program a mixed review

    Date published: 
    August 2, 2016

    "Harlan Yu, a principal at Upturn, lauded Boston police for prohibiting use of facial recognition technology that would let officers take an image and use it to glean information about an individual. He said it is a policy that “departments across the country should take note of.”

    The activists say officers could tailor their statements to reflect only what can be seen in the video, and leave out anything the camera did not capture. There is also concern the policy gives police an advantage over other witnesses.

  • Memphis Police Department’s body camera policy receives low scores from national group

    Date published: 
    August 2, 2016

    "“No department received a green light on this criteria,” said Harlan Yu, a principal at Upturn, who worked on the score card with the Leadership Conference. “However, six department policies have partial prohibitions in place, for certain critical incidents like officer shootings.” 

    “Even if it is not a full implementation and all officers don’t have them, I think it is important that these policies be available, even during the pilot stage, to ensure when there is a full implementation that the policies are appropriate,” Yu said about Memphis."

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