Press

CIS in the news.

  • Paramilitary security tracked and targeted #noDAPL activists, docs show

    Date published: 
    June 2, 2017

    "But the information provided by TigerSwan could have helped police forces overcome that prohibition. Elizabeth Joh, a private security legal scholar at UC Davis, referred to such techniques as a “potential end run on the basic constitutional restraints we place upon police.”"

  • Donald Trump's mobile phone use worries former Obama tech officer

    Date published: 
    June 1, 2017

    "Andrew McLaughlin, former deputy chief technology officer for the Obama administration, said the vulnerabilities were a concern.

    "What we ended up with was a military-grade, encrypted phone that had the microphone ripped out," Mr McLaughlin said, adding that he thinks the White House communications office has prevailed upon Mr Trump to use some kind of phone with enhanced security.

    He suggested one with strong encryption, disabled location services and one that talks with a military network instead of commercial cell services.

  • States 'awaken' to critical infrastructure cyberthreats

    Date published: 
    May 30, 2017

    ""The election did do a lot to awaken the state and local governments that had perhaps not thought so much about cybersecurity," said Brian Nussbaum, assistant professor at the University of Albany's College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity in New York.

  • Telegraph Cyber Security reveals there’s plenty business can do to prevent another WannaCry

    Date published: 
    May 26, 2017

    "Simple though this sounds, if companies are to ensure they’re adequately defended against even comparatively unsophisticated attacks, it’s vital for CTOs and chief information security officers (CISO) to have the full buy-in of their boards. “What I’ve found in talking to boards is there tends to be a nodding and looking serious, rather than actually an understanding what you’re talking about,” quipped Gail Kent, global public policy manager at Facebook. "

  • New Bill Aims To Get More Driverless Cars On Texas Roads

    Date published: 
    May 26, 2017

    "Despite Tesla's claim of a self-driving car out this year, several companies are aiming for 2020 and beyond for a production model. University of South Carolina Assistant Professor of Law Bryant Walker Smith says there are a lot of miles before companies can claim their automated cars are as safe as conventional ones. 

  • Sophistication Of Manchester Bomb Implies There Was Help

    Date published: 
    May 25, 2017

    "“What is important to remember about video cameras is that they are not preventative measures, rather they are exceptionally useful – but for forensics and investigation after the fact,” said Brian Nussbaum, Ph.D., assistant professor, University at Albany’s College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security, and Cybersecurity. “There were and are security measures in place in Manchester. But security measures that can prevent a lone attacker who is outside a security cordon for a major event from setting of a bomb are probably not realistic in most places.”"

  • Newly revived lawsuit could reveal secrets of NSA surveillance program

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2017

    "Not only will it likely reveal more about the secret NSA surveillance program, but it could also potentially end such surveillance, explained Jennifer Granick, director of civil liberties at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. “This is a chance for a real challenge to the programmatic nature of the surveillance.”"

  • UW Resilience Lab hosts talk about cyber aggression’s toxic effects

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2017

    "Speakers for the event were Ellen Taylor, associate vice president for Student Life, and Danielle Citron, professor of law at Maryland University and author of “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace.” 

    During her keynote speech, Citron emphasized the targeting of women and the sexualization that comes alongside it. She noted that women in their 20s are most vulnerable to this form of victimization.

  • EU data regulation will govern the UK despite Brexit

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2017

    "“If companies start taking data management seriously, they will create a positive response loop that will enhance trust in the digital economy,” says Omer Tene, vice president of research at the IAPP. This is what the ICO, MRS and IAPP, as well as the EU hope, that this legislation will lead to good information governance and install confidence among consumers to continue sharing data."

  • A Campus Murder Tests Facebook Clicks as Evidence of Hate

    Date published: 
    May 23, 2017

    ""These are not questions the law has had to answer before," says Neil Richards, a professor of First Amendment and privacy law at Washington University School of Law. "We don’t want to permit a system in which merely reading something or associating with other people can be used as strong evidence that you hold the views of the people you hang out with or the things you read.""

  • Nvidia And Waymo Grab Early Lead In First Lap Of Self-Driving Car Race

    Date published: 
    May 22, 2017

    "“Partnerships will be the key to successfully competing on automated driving – and different companies, from automakers to suppliers to data providers to fleet managers to platform developers, can be valuable partners,” Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and research scholar at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, told Forbes."

  • Roaming Charges

    Date published: 
    May 21, 2017

    "That leeway has drawn criticism from academics and civil-liberties advocates. Elizabeth Joh, a University of California, Davis, law professor, said the doctrine is one of two major Fourth Amendment issues that “really calls out for reconsideration.” (The other, she said, is the border-search exception, which lowers Fourth Amendment protections at or near ports of entry.) Both of the main Supreme Court decisions upon which the third-party doctrine is built date back to the 1970s, when telecommunications technology was far less advanced.

  • Microsoft’s Old Software Is Dangerous. Is There a Duty to Fix It?

    Date published: 
    May 20, 2017

    "Cyber law professor Jennifer Granick of Stanford University suggests auto-industry style liability is not appropriate for software.

    "While it is true that companies need to start to prioritize security in coding, it is unreasonable to ask Microsoft to be liable for anything that can be done with the 50 million lines of code in Windows 10," Granick told Fortune by email."

  • Looking Forward to Our Driverless Future

    Date published: 
    May 19, 2017

    "The challenges are legal as well as technological. Bryant Walker Smith, a member of the legal faculty at the University of South Carolina, says that “historically the federal government has regulated new motor vehicle design, while states have regulated these noncommercial drivers and driving. So here we have an instance where the vehicle is becoming the driver, and that tends to blur some of the lines between the federal role and the state role.”"

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