Press

CIS in the news.

  • National cybersecurity expert weighs in on Russia hacking hearings

    Date published: 
    January 5, 2017

    "National expert Dr. Richard Forno, who is the assistant director of the University of Maryland Baltimore County's cybersecurity program, tells NewsChannel 7 Investigates he was most impressed the committee did not in his view conflate the issues of national security and hacking.

    Forno said there may be similarities between national security and hacking, but those are two separate issues.

    He was also happy to hear data integrity brought up as a national concern.

    Forno agreed the motive was likely election interference.

  • Google Publishes 8 Secrets from FBI Requests

    Date published: 
    January 4, 2017

    "“In our continued effort to increase transparency around government demands for user data, today we begin to make available to the public the National Security Letters (NSLs) we have received where, either through litigation or legislation, we have been freed of nondisclosure obligations,” stated Google’s director of law enforcement, Richard Salgado."

  • Give your car a conscience: Why driverless cars need morals

    Date published: 
    January 4, 2017

    "“We’re talking about self-driving cars, up to two tonnes of steel and machine that could crash into homes and people,” says ethicist Patrick Lin of California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. “We definitely can’t leave it up to manufacturers to do what they want.” It’s time to engage low gear – we have a moral mountain to climb."

  • Trump's 'throw-up-your-hands' approach to cybersecurity worries experts

    Date published: 
    January 3, 2017

    ""The idea that you just sort of throw up your hands and say, 'nothing can ever be secure so why try,'—that's a really dangerous posture and it's really a fundamental challenge to how cybersecurity has been handled in the United States and in other countries across the world for the last several decades," Eichensehr says."

  • Amazon Echo search warrant could spur new prosecution methods, expert says

    Date published: 
    January 3, 2017

    "yan Calo, a professor at the UW School of Law who specializes in privacy, robotics and cyberlaw issues, says the Bentonville Police Department’s fishing expedition is “unlikely to yield anything.” The reason is that the Echo sends information up to Amazon’s cloud only when it hears a wake word, usually “Alexa” or “Echo.”

  • CES 2017: Chrysler joins the autonomous vehicle parade

    Date published: 
    January 3, 2017

    "But while the car has an impressive look, it's hard to say what it will really be capable of. Bryant Walker Smith, leading expert on the legal aspects of autonomous driving, put it this way: "I'd think a concept car —a vision with no certain prospect of actual realization—might aspire to Level 4.""

  • Can a Driverless Shuttle Reduce Car Use on Campus?

    Date published: 
    January 3, 2017

    "“These limited environments are ideal for early experimentation and demonstration, in part because the challenges are simpler and the risk of harm is lower,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who is affiliated with Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society. “They’re also areas with genuine transportation needs for which these slow-speed shuttles are especially well-suited.”"

  • Unlike Our Cars, U.S. Policy Can't Drive Itself

    Date published: 
    December 30, 2016

    "However, scrambling to regulate the emerging industry at the federal or state level may not be the answer, said Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor at Stanford Law School who specializes in autonomous driving.

    “Regulators have somehow focused on the wrong questions by putting attention on superficial laws,” Smith said.

    Smith said governments should instead be looking at broader issues, including the economic consequences of eliminating commercial driving jobs and how self-driving cars will share the road with non-autonomous vehicles.

  • Echoes of murder

    Date published: 
    December 28, 2016

    "Albert Gidari, director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, also thinks that criminal implications of a device like Echo, given the current technological constraints, are flimsy. But larger concerns come into play in a constantly mic’d up world.

  • Five ways AI could change your life

    Date published: 
    December 24, 2016

    "“One is of course the legal status, one is regulating these technologies,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law, asked about the questions hovering around the technology, “another is promoting, another is preparing for the broader changes.”"

    "“The main thing is people talk about maintaining meaningful human control over weapons,” said Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington. “There’s a lot of questions that remain.”"

  • Record breach

    Date published: 
    December 23, 2016

    "As to how regulators might take on enforcement, Northeastern University professor Andrea Matwyshyn, who has advised the FTC on data security policy, said that a major question regulators going forward is the lack of precedent for something like the Yahoo hack. The SEC, for example, would handle an investigation pertaining to whether investors were properly advised of the risks of a major breach. But it’s not clear what the SEC might do.

  • Drones were the hot Christmas gift last year, but where are they now?

    Date published: 
    December 23, 2016

    "There are still considerable legal, technological and public perception problems to overcome, said Ryan Calo, a robotics law expert from the University of Washington School of Law.

    The drone industry is trying to fight heavy local restrictions, fearing state regulations that vary greatly.

    "It's amazing that people are being required to register a toy," Calo said. "All toys are potentially dangerous. You could hit someone in the head with a chessboard.""

  • Roadblock: Uber's driverless fleet stops San Francisco experiment

    Date published: 
    December 22, 2016

    "The move immediately elicited concerns from autonomous driving experts. Bryant Walker Smith, associate professor at the University of South Carolina and an expert in the legal implications of autonomous driving, wondered how the move fit into Uber's "long game."

    Particularly, he said, the move seemed to be at odds with the company's broader mission to build trust in the systems and developers of autonomous vehicles."

  • DOJ Study: Police-Worn Body Cameras Increasingly Recognize Your Face

    Date published: 
    December 22, 2016

    "“A lot of civil rights groups and communities have warned that body worn cameras were going to be used as a tool for police surveillance, rather than as a tool for transparency and accountability,” Harlan Yu, a technologist and principal at Upturn, a think tank that focuses on the intersection of technology, policy, and social issues, told Vocativ."

  • Uber fights self-driving law developed precisely for its situation

    Date published: 
    December 20, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina, said the law is intended to regulate the development of a car that will at one point not need active monitoring, which is what Uber is doing.

    “My view of the law that was passed is that it was intended to apply to this kind of vehicle,” Smith said.

  • Do You Really Need to Cover Your Computer Webcam?

    Date published: 
    December 19, 2016

    "Just beware that putting something over your camera lens isn’t a complete solution, according to Marshall Erwin, head of trust and privacy at Mozilla, which makes the Firefox browser.

    “When you use a webcam cover, you do block the camera lens, but it can also cover the indicator light, which means you can’t see when the camera and more importantly the microphone is activated,” he says. “This means hackers can still be listening in, even if the camera is blocked.”"
  • Google publishes secret FBI customer information requests two months after gag order is lifted

    Date published: 
    December 19, 2016

    ""In our continued effort to increase transparency around government demands for user data, today we begin to make available to the public the National Security Letters (NSLs) we have received where, either through litigation or legislation, we have been freed of nondisclosure obligations," Richard Salgado, Google’s director of law enforcement and information security policy, wrote in a statement."

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