Press

CIS in the news.

  • How Peter Thiel's Palantir Helped the NSA Spy on the Whole World

    Date published: 
    February 22, 2017

    "The former PCAP member who did respond, Stanford privacy scholar Omer Tene, told The Intercept that he was unaware of “any specific relationship, agreement, or project that you’re referring to,” and said he was not permitted to answer whether Palantir’s work with the intelligence community was ever a source of tension with the PCAP. He declined to comment on either the NSA or GCHQ specifically.

  • How a College Kid Made His Honda Civic Self-Driving for $700

    Date published: 
    February 21, 2017

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina, says that federal and state laws probably don’t pose much of a barrier to those with a desire to upgrade their vehicle to share driving duties. NHTSA has authority over companies selling vehicles and systems used to modify them, but consumers have significant flexibility in making changes to their own vehicle, says Smith, who advises the U.S. Department of Transportation on law and automation."

  • New master's degree provides practical approaches to policy, legal and ethical cybersecurity issues

    Date published: 
    February 21, 2017

    ""If you speak with policymakers and technical specialists about cybersecurity, they often speak about similar problems but use totally different languages," said Scott Shackelford, associate professor of business law and ethics at IU's Kelley School of Business and director of the Ostrom Workshop Program on Cybersecurity and Internet Governance.

  • ‘Alexa, Call My Mom!’ — Will The Echo Become A Phone?

    Date published: 
    February 16, 2017

    "We’re headed to a world of embedded sensors in everything, that measure everything, that see everything, that hear everything,” said Albert Gidari, director for privacy at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. “The reality is that technology … kind of blurs law for privacy.”"

  • Regulate That Hairbrush? Cyberlaw Experts Say Maybe

    Date published: 
    February 16, 2017

    "“Seriously, a hairbrush? Do we really need that to be connected to the internet?” LeBlanc asked. Danielle Citron, a nationally known online safety and privacy expert and professor at the University of Maryland’s Francis King Carey School of Law, agreed with him.

    “The problem is that we have everyone rushing to market to network,” Citron said after hearing LeBlanc. “Do we really need to network our underwear” and in the process create so much risk for others, she asked."

  • Congress Could Make Self-Driving Cars Happen—or Ruin Everything

    Date published: 
    February 15, 2017

    "“I’d be wary of dramatic proposals that could create more problems than they solve,” says Bryant Walker Smith, an expert on autonomous vehicles at the University of South Carolina School of Law. After all, this evolving technology permeates so many parts of society: public safety, privacy, the environment, liability and insurance law, employment, urban planning, and more. A law aimed at cutting congestion could tangle with tort law; a clause ensuring passenger privacy could wipe out economic benefits for automakers."

  • What could happen if you refuse to unlock your phone at the US border?

    Date published: 
    February 15, 2017

    "One of House’s lawyers, Catherine Crump, who was then an attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union and now teaches law at the University of California, Berkeley, told Ars that the government claimed House had committed a misdemeanor in violation of 19 US Code Section 507. "They claimed he violated a statute requiring people to provide aid to border officials upon request," she e-mailed. "I am not sure how much of this was government posturing.

  • What Happens When the Computer That Keeps You Alive Can Also Put You In Jail?

    Date published: 
    February 14, 2017

    "Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington who focuses on emerging technologies, said that evidence from devices like pacemakers shouldn’t even be admissible into court. Like DNA evidence before it, Calo said the risk of using it to wrongly implicate someone in a crime is just too high.

    “There’s a tendency to believe that because something is recorded by a machine it is gospel,” Calo said."

  • Civil Rights Groups, Funded by Telecoms, Back Donald Trump’s Plan to Kill Net Neutrality

    Date published: 
    February 13, 2017

    "“The Congress that tried to destroy net neutrality once would only weaken it with legislation that fails to adequately protect those it is meant to serve,” says Malkia Cyril, the executive director of the Center for Media Justice. She noted that the civil rights groups that signed the letter are now calling for putting the future of the internet “into the hands of a GOP Congress that just appointed white supremacist Jeff Sessions to be attorney general.”"

  • A Guide to Getting Past Customs With Your Digital Privacy Intact

    Date published: 
    February 12, 2017

    "Those more involved subversion techniques, warns University of California at Davis law professor Elizabeth Joh, also create the risk that you’ll also arouse more suspicion, making CBP agents all the more likely to detain you or deny entrance to the country. But she has no better answer. “There’s not that much you can do when you cross the border in terms of the government’s power,” she admits."

  • Internet firms’ legal immunity is under threat

    Date published: 
    February 11, 2017

    "In May a court allowed a lawsuit to proceed against Model Mayhem, a network that connects models and photographers, for having failed to warn users that rapists have used the site to target victims. In June a judge decided that Yelp, a site for crowdsourced reviews, cannot challenge a court order to remove a defamatory review of a lawyer by a client. Courts and lawmakers are not about to abolish section 230, says Daphne Keller of the Centre for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, but it is unlikely to survive for decades."

  • 'Give Us Your Passwords'

    Date published: 
    February 10, 2017

    "“While the reasonable-suspicion standard for a border search is pretty low, it would at least preclude a blanket rule that every traveler disclose their passwords to online material and services,” said Al Gidari, the director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society."

  • U.S. House Passes Bill Requiring Warrants to Search Old Emails

    Date published: 
    February 7, 2017

    "Richard Salgado, director of law enforcement and information security at Google (GOOG, +0.47%), said in a statement the measure would "fix a constitutional flaw" in the ECPA. "While there are disagreements about other aspects of surveillance reform, there is no disagreement that emails and electronic content deserve Fourth Amendment protections," he said."

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