Press

CIS in the news.

  • EU rulings on whistleblowers and right-to-be-forgotten laws puts press freedom at risk

    Date published: 
    April 14, 2016

    "The regulation continues to put a heavy onus on Internet companies, which are threatened with fines if they do not comply immediately with takedown requests. "The law still sets out a notice and takedown process that strongly encourages Internet intermediaries to delete challenged content, even if the challenge is legally groundless," Daphne Keller, director of Intermediary Liability at Stanford Law School's Center for Law and Society, warned last December.

  • Bots Need to Learn Some Manners, and It’s on Us to Teach Them

    Date published: 
    April 13, 2016

    "When you have a conversation with a chatbot, it’s clear that you’re talking to software, not a human. The conversation feels stiff. But some bots are adept at shooting the breeze, a skill that can make it hard to know you’re conversing with code. “Disclosure is going to be really important here,” says Woodrow Hartzog, a law professor at Samford University. “Problems can come up when people think they’re dealing with humans, but really they’re dealing with bots.”

  • Can Silly Patents Help Fight Frivolous Lawsuits?

    Date published: 
    April 12, 2016

    "Daniel Nazer, the Mark Cuban Chair to Eliminate Stupid Patents at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a high-tech civil liberties group, is amused by Reben's project — but he's not so sure it's going to help.

    "The patent office looks for prior art when they review patents," he says, "but they tend to look in pretty narrow domains like published technical journals. ... Part of our work is to try and get the patent office to look more broadly.""

  • Here Are 63 Other Cases Where The Government Asked For Help To Unlock A Smartphone

    Date published: 
    April 11, 2016

    "The ACLU also filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the Justice Department in December, seeking additional information on every case involving the All Writs Act. The Justice Department informed ACLU that they were gathering responsive documents, but as of today none have been produced, said Riana Pfefferkorn, a fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, which joined the ACLU in the request. Pfefferkorn said the San Bernardino case should be an indicator of the governm

  • Round One Goes to the FBI, But the Crypto War Isn’t Over

    Date published: 
    April 11, 2016

    "Facing increasingly sophisticated technology, the government has turned toward legalized hacking to defeat digital security measures, said Riana Pfefferkorn of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. In order to catch pedophiles masking their identities using Tor, a program first built for the U.S.

  • Apple v. FBI: Feds will continue fight over iPhone in New York case

    Date published: 
    April 8, 2016

    "Legal experts say the government may be forced in the New York case to provide further details about its independent efforts to unlock iPhones, and suggested the Justice Department is pressing forward because it does not want to leave Orenstein's ruling in place for other courts to follow.

    "I think this is really about not leaving Orenstein's opinion in place because they hate it," said Albert Gidari, director of privacy at Stanford's Center for Internet & Society."

  • David Levine delivers talk on 'confidentiality creep' at Yale

    Date published: 
    April 6, 2016

    "​Associate Professor David Levine gave a talk in early April to attendees at Yale Law School's Information Society Project's 2016 spring conference "Unlocking the Black Box: The Promise and Limits of Algorithmic Accountability in the Professions."

  • San Bernardino iPhone Could Play Key Role In New York Encryption Case

    Date published: 
    April 4, 2016

    "Albert Gidari, the director of privacy at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society, told BuzzFeed News that if the San Bernardino method does work on the New York device, the Justice Department would withdraw its appeal — to fight Apple another day. “They don’t like leaving Judge Orenstein’s order in place, but it will not be of much precedent, and they feel confident that their legal position will prevail in a better case in the future.”"

  • The Scarlett Johansson Bot Is the Robotic Future of Objectifying Women

    Date published: 
    April 4, 2016

    "“It being animate all of a sudden for some reason feels too invasive,” said Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington. “If [Ma] were to gain commercially in almost any way from this, and even arguably the notoriety he has gained from this, Scarlett Johansson could almost certainly sue him.”

  • Can we trust robots to make moral decisions?

    Date published: 
    April 3, 2016

    "And this isn’t simply a matter of arguing until we figure out the right answer. Patrick Lin, director of Ethics + Emerging Sciences Group at California Polytechnic State University, says ethics may not be internally consistent, which would make it impossible to reduce to programs. “The whole system may crash when it encounters paradoxes or unresolvable conflicts,” he says.

  • Learn Tesla Model 3's key moves in autonomous driving, batteries, and charging

    Date published: 
    April 1, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, professor at the University of South Carolina, and an expert on the legal aspects of self-driving vehicles, is excited about Tesla's impact on autonomous driving.

    "If Tesla succeeds in making its cars mainstream," said Smith, "it will also make important features like over-the-air updates and advanced sensors mainstream as well—technologies, applications, and even business models upon which automated driving will build.""

  • Hello, Privacy Shield

    Date published: 
    April 1, 2016

    "“We'll need to see how it plays out with U.S. law,” says Omer Tene, VP of research and education at the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), who, as a U.S. lawyer, is eager to review the text carefully to “reflect on how the paradigm shifted compared to the Safe Harbor.”"

  • Experts Question The FBI’s Thinking In Keeping iPhone Hack A Secret

    Date published: 
    March 31, 2016

    "Riana Pfefferkorn, the cryptography fellow at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society, told BuzzFeed News that responsible disclosures can enable companies like Apple to “to alert their users, come up with a fix, and push it out to their users through software updates.” But from the Justice Department’s perspective, a successful security patch can also represent the loss of a law enforcement tool. “The key thing is that Apple can’t fix what they don’t know about, so the DOJ wouldn’t lose this method if they keep it secret,” Pfefferkorn said.

  • Apple and Google devices have been target of fed demands for years

    Date published: 
    March 31, 2016

    ""I think they mixed Apples and Androids here," said Albert Gidari, director of privacy for Stanford law school's Center for Internet and Society. "It tells us ... about the past, it tells us nothing about tomorrow. If the San Bernardino order is a harbinger of things to come, it's an ugly future that will be fought over very hard.""

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