Press

CIS in the news.

  • 'Net neutrality' rules for fair internet access win in court

    Date published: 
    June 14, 2016

    "This decision is huge for the FCC's authority," said Marvin Ammori, a longtime net-neutrality advocate. "We won big on everything." That sets the stage for what Ammori and several analysts see as the next big battle. That will likely involve "zero rating" — the practice of exempting preferred video services from customer data caps."

  • T-Mobile adds PBS, other partners to Binge On

    Date published: 
    June 14, 2016

    ""Binge On allows some providers to join easily and creates lasting barriers for others, especially small players, non-commercial providers, and start-ups," Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick wrote earlier this year. "As such, the program harms competition, user choice, free expression, and innovation.""

  • The Tiny European Country That Became A Global Leader In Digital Government

    Date published: 
    June 14, 2016

    "Governments at all levels in the United States will pursue digital city initiatives, but society “will be slow to embrace such innovations because of the enormous failures in security” that have occurred in the country, such as the breach of systems at the federal Office of Personnel Management, said Albert Gidari, director of privacy at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School.

  • Why India should keep an eye on Europe

    Date published: 
    June 13, 2016

    "“The law is neither with the telecom companies nor with the activists. It has been overcomplicated and could be interpreted either way,” says Thomas Lohninger, an activist who is a part of the savetheinternet.eu campaign which has nearly 22 digital rights organisations across Europe under its ambit.

  • Supreme Court okays troll toll increase

    Date published: 
    June 13, 2016

    "EFF Staff Attorney Daniel Nazer said that the ruling was unsurprising, but pointed out that the decision does not give free reign to judges to issue pumped-up awards.

    "EFF is glad to see that the Court emphasized that enhanced damages should still be reserved for the most egregious cases," Nazer told The Register.

    "We agree with the concurrence that district courts should be cautious not to impose enhanced damages too often, especially where non-practicing entities send threat letters out to numerous small businesses.""

  • Is it Hate or Terrorism?

    Date published: 
    June 13, 2016

    ""It's easy for people to be selective about the incidents and evidence they choose to fit the narrative they're putting forth," says University at Albany public administration professor Brian Nussbaum, a former intelligence analyst with the New York State office of Counterterrorism. Nussbaum sees the Orlando event as both a hate crime and a terror attack – but politicians with widely divergent bases of political support are parsing the issue."

  • Where Can You Even “Drive” a Driverless Car?

    Date published: 
    June 10, 2016

    "“Under existing law, the federal government regulates motor vehicle design, and the states regulate driving and noncommercial drivers,” says Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor of at the University of South Carolina who studies driverless cars. “The challenge here is you have the vehicle becoming the driver in many ways. That muddies this division of roles between the federal government and the state government.”"

  • Why is Google's co-founder secretly investing in flying cars?

    Date published: 
    June 9, 2016

    ""Silicon Valley is full of secret projects: Flying cars are almost quaint by comparison (since people have been proposing them for decades)," Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law who studies the technology, tells the Monitor in an email. "They will raise pretty significant environmental and equity concerns.""

  • Self-Driving Cars Will Teach Themselves to Save Lives—But Also Take Them

    Date published: 
    June 9, 2016

    “With Go or chess or Space Invaders, the goal is to win, and we know what winning looks like,” says Lin. “But in ethical decision-making, there is no clear goal. That’s the whole trick. Is the goal to save as many lives as possible? Is the goal to not have the responsibility for killing? There is a conflict in the first principles.”

  • Modern variations on the 'Trolley Problem' meme

    Date published: 
    June 8, 2016

    "The article then paraphrases philosophy professor Patrick Lin, whose work at Cal Poly focuses in part on the ethics of driverless cars. According to Lin, "On the one hand, [the trolley problem] is a great entry point and teaching tool for engineers with no background in ethics. On the other hand, its prevalence, whimsical tone, and iconic status can shield you from considering a wider range of dilemmas and ethical considerations.""

  • Why you should think twice before spilling your guts to a chatbot

    Date published: 
    June 8, 2016

    "“Chatbots may be able to get us to say more about ourselves than an ordinary website,” says Ryan Calo, codirector of the Tech Policy Lab at the University of Washington.

    “Consider a chatbot that leverages the social principle of reciprocity,” says Mr. Calo. “If a chatbot, like an online form, just says: ‘Enter your age here,’ you might not. But if amidst a conversation with a chatbot it says, ‘I was created last year. When were you born?’ you well might. At least that's what experimental studies by Cliff Nass and others have shown.”"
  • Lexus struggles with software bug: What this means for automakers

    Date published: 
    June 8, 2016

    "Even the stereo, which was affected by Lexus's update, can create an unsafe situation, robotics law expert Ryan Calo told the Monitor. For example, buggy software might cause the radio to blare suddenly, startling the driver and causing an accident.

    Tesla recently introduced a software update to control the whole vehicle, Dr. Calo tells the Monitor, although he says Lexus' update is technically not critical to safety. 

    The result, he says, is that "The line between control-critical and entertainment systems is not perfectly clean.""

  • Online anti-Semitism: Difficult to Fight, but Even Harder to Quantify

    Date published: 
    June 7, 2016

    "Danielle Citron, a professor of law at the University of Maryland and an expert on online harassment, is not sure whether online anti-Semitism is spreading or simply drawing more attention. “What I can say is that it’s become more mainstream,” she notes. “It is no longer hidden in the dark corners of the internet like it once was. We are now seeing it on very mainstream platforms like Facebook and Twitter.”

  • Why is everyone covering up their laptop cameras?

    Date published: 
    June 6, 2016

    "Yet not everyone is on the camera-covering bandwagon. Brian Pascal, a privacy expert who has worked for Stanford and Palantir Technologies says a cost-benefit analysis led him conclude he’d rather have a usable camera, which he can use to record his son. But he acknowledged such stickers are a way for people signal that they too worry about Big Brother.

    “Security actions without threat modelling are just performative,” said Pascal."

  • EU, U.S. sign data privacy umbrella agreement

    Date published: 
    June 6, 2016

    "Industry professionals warn of the economic consequences that the lack of certainty involving data sharing agreements could create. International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) Vice President of Research and Education Omer Tene said the debate involving these agreements will “cast doubt on the viability of the existing framework and foments an extended period of uncertainty and risk for businesses in the US and EU.”"

  • Will the Constitution Protect Your Next Smartphone?

    Date published: 
    June 3, 2016

    "But these decisions don’t necessarily mean the debate over the Fifth Amendment and fingerprint readers is all wrapped up, says Al Gidari, a technology lawyer and the director of privacy at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society.

  • Outing is totally still a thing, people

    Date published: 
    June 3, 2016

    "“The fact is we have made some important progress with regard to the LGBT community; what 50 years ago was a crime is now in some states protected by antidiscrimination law. They have the right to marry, that’s a lot of progress,” said Danielle Citron, a University of Maryland law professor. “But prejudices continue. The suggestion that bigotry and hate is going to somehow disappear because the law has changed is out of touch with reality, and outing someone for being LGBT can still do damage.”"

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