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  • Buy Buy Privacy

    Date published: 
    December 7, 2015

    Planning to do some online holiday shopping? LSA Ph.D. student Darren Stevenson explains how advertisers get and use your personal data to predict what you’ll buy—and, sometimes, even what you’ll pay.

    You finally dug out the snow pants and scarves, paired the stray gloves and mittens, and found your son’s snow boots that are at least two sizes too small. The next time you’re at your computer, you type “boys winter boots” into a search engine and scan through dozens of websites that probably sell exactly what you’re looking for.

  • Prison Telecom Giant Securus Awarded Patent for Billing Inmate's Relatives

    Date published: 
    December 1, 2015

    "“There’s this perverse thing where sometimes the more obvious a thing is, the harder it is to prove it’s been awarded a patent improperly because it’s so obvious that no one would write it down so there’s no documentation,” said EFF staff attorney Daniel Nazer. “No one is going to write in a technical article, ‘hey it might be a good idea to reach out to people to pay for services,’ because that’s so obvious.”

  • Judiciary chairman wants warrant exception in email privacy bill

    Date published: 
    December 1, 2015

    ""It unfortunately appears to be the case that some law enforcement officials make emergency disclosure requests because it is easier than getting legal process, with the checks that come with it, even though legal process is available in a timely manner," Google's Richard Salgado said in prepared remarks. "

  • Lawmakers take up government's ability to get old emails without a search warrant

    Date published: 
    December 1, 2015

    "Google's law enforcement director, Richard Salgado, told lawmakers that provisions under the old law "do not reflect the reasonable expectations of privacy of users."

    He also noted that the Justice Department has said there is no reason under privacy law for criminal investigators to treat old emails differently than newer emails. The Supreme Court ruled last year that law enforcement officers generally need a warrant to search the contents of a cellphone."

  • Breaking Down Cox's Trial Over Subscriber Music Piracy

    Date published: 
    December 1, 2015

    "Annemarie Bridy, a University of Idaho law professor and affiliate scholar at Stanford University's Center for Internet and Society, co-wrote a law professors' amicus brief on behalf of YouTube Inc. in the Viacom v. YouTube case, which raised some similar issues. She says she has been following BMG v. Cox and that the court's decision on the DMCA safe harbor provision is the issue in the case that is most likely to have wider-reaching implications.

  • House panel considers bill to protect email privacy

    Date published: 
    December 1, 2015

    "The head of law enforcement for Google, Inc. said the giant tech company supports the bill as a way to protect the privacy of its customers.

    "Users expect, as they should, that documents they store online have the same Fourth Amendment protections as documents stored at home," said Richard Salgado, Google's director of law enforcement and information security."

  • Battle over 1986 email-privacy law heats up in House debate

    Date published: 
    December 1, 2015

    "But in his prepared testimony, Richard Salgado, Google's director for law enforcement and information security, argued that such an exemption for civil agencies made no sense. 

    "The power to compel [Internet service] providers to disclose the content of users' communications should be reserved for criminal cases," he said. "Congress should be deeply skeptical of efforts to draft around the Fourth Amendment, which is what some governmental entities are asking it to do."

  • SEC, Google at Odds Over E-Mail Privacy Bill

    Date published: 
    December 1, 2015

    "“H.R. 699 represents an overdue update to ECPA that would ensure electronic communications content is treated in a commensurate manner to other papers and effects stored in the home, which are protected by the Fourth Amendment,” Richard Salgado, Google's director of law enforcement and information security, said in testimony written for the hearing. “It is long past time for Congress to pass a clean version of H.R. 699.”

    Salgado said Congress should reject proposals that would create a civil agency carve-out."

  • Focus Turns to Judge in Latest Appeal of Net Neutrality Rules

    Date published: 
    November 30, 2015

    "“Judge Tatel’s inclusion on the panel is probably good for net neutrality advocates,” said Marvin Ammori, a lawyer and net neutrality activist. “In the previous case, he provided a legal road map for the FCC to follow. The FCC carefully followed Judge Tatel’s road map. And nobody would understand that better than Mr. Tatel himself.”"

  • FCC Hires Online Tracking Expert Jonathan Mayer

    Date published: 
    November 24, 2015

    "In a move that signals a focus on Web privacy, the Federal Communications Commission has tapped Jonathan Mayer to serve as chief technologist of its enforcement bureau.

    Mayer, a lawyer and computer scientist, is known for exposing questionable privacy practices of tech companies, ranging from large corporations like Google to ad tech companies like Epic Markeplace.

  • With this hire, the FCC could soon get tougher on privacy and security

    Date published: 
    November 24, 2015

    "The Federal Communications Commission has hired Jonathan Mayer, a rising star in privacy circles, to serve as its technical lead for investigations into telephone, television and Internet service providers.

    He will work primarily on consumer protection issues, especially those having to do with security and privacy, agency spokeswoman Shannon Gilson confirmed.

  • Elon professor joins opposition to cyber-espionage legislation

    Date published: 
    November 20, 2015

    "Elon University School of Law professor David Levine is one of 42 law and technology experts to weigh in opposing a cyber-espionage act in Congress.

    Levine is one of four writers of a 23-page letter to leaders of the House Judiciary Committee opposing the Defense of Trade Secrets Act.

  • UAlbany hosts forum on Paris attacks

    Date published: 
    November 20, 2015

    "University professors Brian Nussbaum and Jim Steiner, and Rick Mathews, Director of the National Center for Security & Preparedness were among the panel of six experts who gave brief talks and took questions from the audience.  Nussbaum is an assistant professor of Public Administration.  “There were a lot of interesting questions about security, and the tradeoff that comes with certain kinds of security measures and the implications for France, homeland security here in the United States,” Professor Nussbaum said."

  • Experts weigh benefits, problems of open data

    Date published: 
    November 19, 2015

    "Speaking on a panel on the topic hosted by the Microsoft Innovation & Policy Center in Washington, D.C., Ryan Calo, assistant professor of the University of Washington School of Law, said there was “an opportunity” to strengthen the security of the data governments manage.

    “I think that governments of all kinds, local and federal, can improve the overall ecosystem on privacy and security,” he said during the panel.

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