Press

CIS in the news.

  • How Realistic Is Tesla’s Plan to Drive Across the U.S. Completely Autonomously?

    Date published: 
    November 8, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, an automotive engineer and lawyer who specializes in autonomous driving, said he believes the trip is definitely possible, but that people need to understand the difference between fully autonomous driving and partial automation. In this case, partial automation means it’s not full-time self-driving, but rather a mode that can be switched on where the car can handle all the driving without the need for human input. This would classify as level 4 automation and anything under level 4 is basically advanced cruise control that can brake and steer.

  • Ex-Playboy Playmate's Charge in 'Body Shaming' Case Could Send Legal Shockwaves

    Date published: 
    November 4, 2016

    ""When you do hear about lawsuits with respect to photos on social media, it usually is in a civil action," Professor Jeffrey Vagle, executive director of the Center for Technology, Innovation & Competition at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, told NBC News. "This is a big deal because it is a criminal action.""

  • Will The FCC’s Privacy Regs Actually Change The Status Quo On Consent?

    Date published: 
    November 2, 2016

    "Requiring an opt-in might sound more onerous and more likely to protect privacy because the user has to actively provide affirmative consent, but “the fact of the matter is that contracts are usually boilerplate and are hardly ever read by consumers,” said Omer Tene, VP of research and education at the International Association of Privacy Professionals.

  • Encryption Policy in the Modern Age: A Not So Simple Debate

    Date published: 
    November 2, 2016

    "Jennifer Granick, director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, explained that separating the needs of law enforcement from the public’s rights under the Constitution is not as simple as it might seem. She calls this policy battle the third “crypto war.”

  • Hitting back at hackers: debate swirls on how far to go

    Date published: 
    November 1, 2016

    "Patrick Lin, who led a study this year for California Polytechnic State University on the ethics of hacking back, said there is "a moral case for hacking back, but an under-developed case for its legality and effectiveness."

    In the report, Lin wrote that while it is difficult to know whether hacking back has deterrent value, "doing nothing, as seems to be the case now, certainly offers no deterrence and likely encourages cyber-attackers to continue preying on others."

  • Here’s what to expect from this week’s CRTC hearings

    Date published: 
    November 1, 2016

    "Ultimately, in addition to soliciting comments from the public until June 17, the CRTC asked a wide range of experts to contribute to the hearing, including Danish Internet economics and policy expert Roslyn Layton, Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick, and even Reddit, with the CRTC soliciting the website’s Internet-savvy Canadian users for feedback and adding more than 1,200 of their comments to the public record."

  • It’s Finally Legal To Hack Your Own Devices (Even Your Car)

    Date published: 
    October 31, 2016

    "“This is a tremendously important improvement for consumer protection,” says Andrea Matwyshyn, a professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University. “The Copyright Office has demonstrated that it understands our changed technological reality, that in every aspect of consumers’ lives, we rely on code,” says Matwyshyn, who argued for the exemptions last year.

  • Our autonomous future: How driverless cars will be the first robots we learn to trust

    Date published: 
    October 28, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, professor at the University of South Carolina, also sees a major problem with Level 3. "If there's a hazard on the road and if the driver doesn't re-engage, the system doesn't have to do anything about it," he said "That's a very scary design prospect."

    Environmental factors are a concern as well. Navigating tricky situations at stop signs, figuring out what to do when unknown variables like animals run into the road or driving safely in bad weather can be problematic. Most systems, said Smith, have not yet been tested in snow."

  • Why Body Camera Programs Fail

    Date published: 
    October 27, 2016

    ""One of the main selling points for body-worn cameras is their promise to bring transparency and accountability to police community interactions," says Harlan Yu, a founder of Upturn, a Washington, D.C.-based firm that provides analysis to policymakers, and the author of a recent national "scorecard" on body-worn camera policies. But the cameras, he says, "don't automatically provide accountability."

  • Tesla’s Self-Driving Car Plan Seems Insane, But It Just Might Work

    Date published: 
    October 24, 2016

    "Musk prefers the ask for forgiveness, rather than permission, approach. “It is a way of changing facts on the ground, and that’s what Tesla, and more disruptive companies like Uber are really good at,” says Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law who studies self-driving vehicles."

  • Taser Explores Concept of Drone Armed With Stun Gun for Police Use

    Date published: 
    October 20, 2016

    "Like the bomb robot, such a product would raise fundamental questions about police use of force, said Elizabeth Joh, a professor at the University of California, Davis, School of Law.

    When police use force, “the premise is there is an imminent danger to the police officer or to the public, but when you create a distance between the officer and the use of force that raises different questions,” said Ms. Joh.

  • Level 5 autonomous driving comes to all new Teslas

    Date published: 
    October 20, 2016

    ""This announcement is exciting because it's full of potential," said Bryant Walker Smith, professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law and School of Engineering, and one of the leading thinkers in the autonomous vehicle world. "Tesla isn't delivering truly automated driving yet, but it is showing us how it'll get there—and exactly who will eventually get it."

    "When Tesla decides that its system is actually ready, then these latent hardware capabilities will enable a pretty amazing Easter Egg!" Smith said.

  • Tesla Says All Vehicles in Production Capable of Self-Driving

    Date published: 
    October 19, 2016

    "“At some point they will flip a switch and the world will look different,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who’s written extensively on driverless car liability. “They haven’t flipped a switch yet, but they are building out the wiring.”"

  • CIA-backed surveillance software was marketed in public schools wanting to monitor students' social media posts

    Date published: 
    October 19, 2016

    ""Discovering that Geofeedia was not only being used by social media sites to help police spy on activists of color was disturbing enough," said Malkia Cyril, executive director of the Center for Media Justice. "But then to find out this third-party vendor is also helping to police public school students is beyond disturbing, it's a terrifying bypass of the most basic rights of some of the most vulnerable, and most dissident, voices in the country: activists of colour and students.""

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