Press

CIS in the news.

  • The 2,578 Problems With Self-Driving Cars

    Date published: 
    February 2, 2017

    "“Waymo’s report would seem to suggest substantial improvement,” says Bryant Walker-Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina. “But I’d want to know whether Waymo’s system could handle any of the system-initiated disengagements by achieving a minimal risk condition, say by pulling off to the side of the road, rather than immediately disengaging.”"

  • Alert: Sunrise Coming in May for New Privacy Law, Enforcer in Japan

    Date published: 
    February 2, 2017

    "Woodrow Hartzog, Starnes Professor of Law at the Cumberland School of Law at Samford University, told Bloomberg BNA that the amended act “makes some very important changes, but like with most new pieces of privacy legislation, many important terms will need to be more fully defined and interpreted.”

    Hartzog said that “under the old law, the privacy rules were largely conceived of as obligations on businesses.” Companies will probably see a rise in individuals requesting access to personal data and seeking to delete or correct that information, he said."

  • These 23 Principles Could Help Us Avoid an AI Apocalypse

    Date published: 
    February 2, 2017

    "Patrick Lin, a conference attendee and the the director of the Ethics + Emerging Sciences Group at California Polytechnic State University, says the Asilomar AI principles sprung from “a perfect storm of influences” he hadn’t encountered before. “This was a standard-setting exercise in a field that has no cohesive identity, making the exercise much more difficult,” he told Gizmodo."

  • Experts: DMV reports reveal driverless cars still need humans at the helm

    Date published: 
    February 1, 2017

    "“It’s a small glimpse into a small part of what a relatively small number of companies are doing,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a scholar with Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society.

    There are more questions that need answers, Smith said, such as what would happen if the driver didn’t intervene. Would the car know to pull to the side of the road to avoid a collision?"

  • Encryption for All: Why This American Tradition Must Be Upheld

    Date published: 
    January 31, 2017

    "While many proponents of backdoors say that they are vital to intelligence gathering processes, privacy advocates like King believe that the very premise of a backdoor is faulty. “If you put a backdoor in for law enforcement, you put it in for China, you put it in for Russia,” King says. Meaning: if you engineer a backdoor for one purpose, you can’t guarantee that it won’t be exploited for another."

  • Trump’s SCOTUS Pick Needs to Get Tech—These Cases Show Why

    Date published: 
    January 31, 2017

    "Now the Supreme Court, which will hear arguments in this case in February, must decide whether constitutional rights apply across US borders. That’s where things get interesting for tech firms who store data on servers all over the world. “It sounds like it has nothing to do with technology, until you think about cloud,” says Neil Richards, a professor at Washington University Law School."

  • Gorsuch Might Play Key Role In Cell Phone Privacy Issues If Confirmed To The Supreme Court

    Date published: 
    January 31, 2017

    "“We will see technical assistance to decrypt communications or facilitate access find its way to the court,” Albert Gidari, the director of privacy at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society, told BuzzFeed News. “Trump spoke to this issue during the campaign, and I think there are a number of cases in the works for the Department of Justice that would be good candidates.”"

  • Fight over Tesla's ex-Autopilot director shows talent war escalating

    Date published: 
    January 30, 2017

    "“Many of the companies involved in automated driving are motivated by an intense combination of hope, greed and fear,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who’s written about driverless car liability. “The tremendous competition for individuals and ideas was inevitably going to reach a courtroom, particularly given all the overlapping and conflicting interests in this field.”"

  • Killing the immortal: Why scientists are debating the life span of robots

    Date published: 
    January 26, 2017

    "Kill switches are a "no-brainer" said Patrick Lin, associate professor at director of the Ethics and Emerging Sciences group at California Polytechnic State University, but it's unclear who will control them. Governments or the system's owners could both potentially have the power to turn off robots."

  • People are bad at taking over from autonomous cars

    Date published: 
    January 26, 2017

    "I learned about the case of [Ferguson v. Bombardier Services Corp] from Robots in American Law, a study published by University of Washington assistant law professor Ryan Calo. I spoke to Calo about the latest study.

    “The pilot got sued by the survivors of the victims,” Calo said today. “That’s one very clear-cut case where a person was bad at monitoring and taking control from a rudimentary autopilot and it resulted in an autopilot, for which a human got blamed.”"

  • This Creepy “Family History” Site Might Know Way Too Much About You

    Date published: 
    January 25, 2017

    "Other genealogy sites such as Ancestry.com have all that same information on file. Sure, they have fees, but a bit of red tape won’t stop anyone who’s determined enough, says Albert Gidari, director of privacy at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet & Society. “People intent on identity theft or harassment aren’t going to be deterred by a $12.99 price tag to pull a record from any other site,” he says, “and they’re not deterred from spending another half hour looking through records.”"

  • New Ostrom program assesses issues of cybersecurity

    Date published: 
    January 25, 2017

    "On the third floor of The Vincent and Elinor Ostrom Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis building, nestled in the corner at the end of a hallway in, sits a room, devoid of clutter and noise, with vibrantly patterned carpeting. This is where professor Scott Shackelford directs his new program, Governance of Internet and Cybersecurity.

  • Tesla to release 'fully self-driving' mode in 3-6 months: What it means

    Date published: 
    January 25, 2017

    "Ultimately, it's a matter of definitions. "Completely self-driving from any origin to any destination under any conditions without any human monitoring or intervention?" said Bryant Walker Smith, professor at the University of South Carolina and one of the leading experts on the legal aspects of self-driving vehicles. "No. High automation under certain conditions or on a continuous stretch of a road? Yes!""

  • How Lexmark's patent fight to crush an ink reseller will affect us all

    Date published: 
    January 24, 2017

    "Daniel Nazer, staff attorney at the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Mark Cuban Chair to Eliminate Stupid Patents, said in a phone interview with The Register, "There's a risk companies will increasingly turn to patent law to do things they're not otherwise allowed to do."

    Nazer pointed to a shampoo maker that tried unsuccessfully to block the importation of a product into the US by asserting a copyright claim on the shampoo bottle label. He observed that a design patent claim could be employed in an attempt to achieve the same anti-competitive result.

  • Microsoft victory in overseas data privacy case stands

    Date published: 
    January 24, 2017

    "Jennifer Granick of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society has argued that a Microsoft win could mean these cases are decided in countries with fewer privacy protections, and drive more companies to "localize" data in places where authorities can't access it."

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