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CIS in the news.

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  • How Human Do We Want Our Robots To Be?: A Future Tense Event Recap.

    Date published: 
    January 25, 2016

    "The central issue may come down to what Christine Rosen, senior editor of the New Atlantis, called “the Stepford Wife problem,” which she described as the probability that we’ll end up with emotional attachments to our robots. But Woodrow Hartzog, a law professor at Samford University and the owner of a Roomba nicknamed Rocko, argued that there’s nothing wrong with developing an emotional attachment to a robot.

  • Drone Lobbying Heats Up on Capitol Hill

    Date published: 
    January 24, 2016

    "“Now that there is so much interest and money in drones, everyone wants to get their say” said Ryan Calo, an assistant professor of law at the University of Washington who is focused on robotics. A bill under consideration in Congress “is a way for people who aren’t getting what they want out of the process or getting it fast enough to get their views injected.”"

  • Oakland’s Privacy Commission Could Lead Nation on Surveillance Oversight

    Date published: 
    January 22, 2016

    "“It’s really exciting,” said Catherine Crump, an assistant clinical professor at UC Berkeley’s law school, who has been following Oakland’s story.

    “It’s an example of a community trying to grasp hold of how technology is changing, and actually exert some control over the degree which people are going to be subject to surveillance and then in what ways,” she said.

  • Auto leaders lend advice on regulating future car tech

    Date published: 
    January 22, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina, went a bit further in depth with his advice.

    “The details matter but the broader social context determines how many of those details will be interpreted,” Smith said. “So states need to begin by closely auditing their existing laws, identifying all of the potential obstacles and impediments to particular technologies, in consultation with the developers, who should be doing the same thing.

  • FBI ran website sharing thousands of child porn images

    Date published: 
    January 21, 2016

    "“At some point, the government investigation becomes indistinguishable from the crime, and we should ask whether that’s OK,” said Elizabeth Joh, a University of California Davis law professor who has studied undercover investigations. “What’s crazy about it is who’s making the cost/benefit analysis on this? Who decides that this is the best method of identifying these people?”"

  • Can Silicon Valley help stem hate speech gone viral?

    Date published: 
    January 21, 2016

    "“It’s a game of Whac-A-Mole,” said Beth Van Schaack, who served as senior adviser in the State Department’s Office of Global Criminal Justice and is a visiting scholar at Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation. In the best-case scenario, “you can shut them down for a limited amount of time” before the same users, or others, create new accounts and gain more online followers."

  • A QUOI RÊVENT LES ROBOTS ?

    Date published: 
    January 18, 2016

    "Alors, quelle activité en propre restera-t-il aux humains face à des robots habiles, véloces et calculateurs ? Le philosophe Dominique Lestel, dans son ouvrage  A quoi sert

  • A woman sued Twitter for supporting terrorism. Why the lawsuit is nonsense.

    Date published: 
    January 15, 2016

    "Twitter will likely be able to get the lawsuit dismissed. Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act protects platforms like Twitter from liability for what kind of content users post to their platforms. In the eyes of the law, holding Twitter accountable for what shows up on the network is a little like holding the postal service accountable for what people send in the mail.

  • The Feds Will Have Rules for Self-Driving Cars in the Next 6 Months

    Date published: 
    January 14, 2016

    "“This is an aggressive and ambitious embrace of automated driving,” says Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law and affiliate scholar at the Center for Internet and Society, who studies self-driving vehicles.

    “NHTSA recognizes that its toolbox is much larger than regulations and recalls,” Walker Smith says. “Voluntary guidelines, interpretations, best practices, model policies, and waivers all provide relative speed and flexibility.”"
  • Cadillac’s Delaying Its First Whack at a Self-Driving Car

    Date published: 
    January 14, 2016

    "Tesla has willingly stepped into a “mushy middle space,” says Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law and affiliate scholar at the Center for Internet and Society, who studies self-driving vehicles. Traditional automakers are far more risk-averse. In the realm of autonomy, they want rules to follow, so they can’t later be attacked for being reckless. They’ll take their time rolling out autonomous technology, disappointing those who can’t wait to hand over the wheel."

  • Google says its futuristic self-driving cars needed some old-fashioned human intervention to avoid 11 crashes during testing on California roads

    Date published: 
    January 12, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina who closely follows self-driving car developments, said the rate of potential collisions was "not terribly high, but certainly not trivial." He said it remains difficult to gauge how Google's cars compare to accident rates among human drivers, since even the best data underreport minor collisions that are never reported to authorities."

  • Google reports self-driving car mistakes: 272 failures and 13 near misses

    Date published: 
    January 12, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor in the School of Law at the University of South Carolina, says the DMV could reasonably ask for more information. “Google could be clearer on how it draws the line between those driver-initiated disengagements that it reports and those that it does not,” he says. “The DMV is entitled to interpret its own rule, and it may have questions on this point.”"

  • The federal crime nobody talks about in 'Making a Murderer'

    Date published: 
    January 6, 2016

    "Jennifer Granick, director of civil liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, said accessing Halbach's wireless account is possibly a violation of the CFAA. “The short answer is yes, it could be,” she told the Daily Dot in an email, though she says she has not yet watched Making a Murderer."

  • Not on Her Watch

    Date published: 
    January 5, 2016

    TO UNDERSTAND JENNIFER GRANICK’S VIEWS on freedom and privacy, consider her interactions with Apple. In 2010, she and the company were at odds. Debate was raging over the practice of “jailbreaking,” which enabled iPhone users to circumvent locks Apple put on its devices so they could switch carriers or install apps not sold by Apple. The company claimed the practice led to copyright infringement. Then, Granick was civil liberties director at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, an advocacy group focused on protecting individuals’ rights in the digital world.

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