Press

CIS in the news.

  • When your driverless car crashes, who will be responsible? The answer remains unclear

    Date published: 
    September 7, 2016

    ""Liability is a poorly understood word," said Bryant Walker Smith, one of the leading experts in the legal aspects of autonomous driving. "It can refer to criminal liability (who is convicted of a felony or misdemeanor), quasi-criminal liability (who gets the speeding ticket), and civil liability (who has to pay for the harm they caused to someone else). In addition, only rarely are any of these forms of liability binary: Just because one actor is liable doesn't mean that another actor isn't.""

  • Michigan moves forward with autonomous vehicle testing

    Date published: 
    September 7, 2016

    "But Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law who has studied the legal impact of self-driving cars, said that some of the bills could protect automakers from ride-sharing competition from companies such as Google, Apple or other technology developers.

  • Multinational Companies Remain Wary of U.S.-EU Data-Transfer Pact

    Date published: 
    September 6, 2016

    "Legal experts offered several reasons why companies aren’t embracing Privacy Shield, including the possibility that it, too, will be invalidated. “There is a legal uncertainty of the future of this arrangement because we saw what happened with Safe Harbor,” saidOmer Tene, vice president of research at the International Association of Privacy Professionals.

  • What will keep your self-driving car from killing you in the future?

    Date published: 
    September 1, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law, tells Inverse that each of those vehicle types has its own set of rules to follow.

    “The way law applies to Tesla’s Autopilot is different from how law applies to Uber’s supervised automated driving, and it’s different from how law might apply to a truly driverless shuttle,” Smith says. “That matters because really the devil is in the details.”

  • Survey: 34% of privacy pros expect their companies to certify under Privacy Shield

    Date published: 
    September 1, 2016

    "Omer Tene, VP of Research and Education at the IAPP, suggested in an interview with SCMagazine.com that companies may be disinclined to jump through the regulatory hoops required for Privacy Shield certification, with the looming prospect of the courts finding this policy lacking as they did with Safe Harbor. “Companies might be thinking… it may not be worth going through the exercise to begin with,” said Tene.

  • Trump's New App Wants You — and Your Data

    Date published: 
    August 31, 2016

    "To be sure, this doesn't mean the Trump campaign is doing anything with users' data — it just means it can. And some users may not know it: David Levine, an Elon University professor and affiliate scholar with Stanford's Center for Internet and Society, said consumers don't always read privacy policies. What's more: Less than half of all Americans knew what a privacy policy was in a late 2014 Pew survey.

  • Europe's net neutrality guidelines seen as a victory for the open web

    Date published: 
    August 30, 2016

    "Net neutrality advocates welcomed BEREC's guidelines as a milestone for the open internet in Europe. "Europe is now a global standard-setter in the defense of the open, competitive and neutral internet," Joe McNamee, executive director of the Brussels-based organization European Digital Rights (EDRi), said in a statement. Net neutrality activist Thomas Lohninger, of SaveTheInternet.eu, described the tougher guidelines as "a triumph for the European digital rights movement."

  • Hate Pokémon Go? You Can Still Love Augmented Reality

    Date published: 
    August 30, 2016

    "With the Be My Eyes app, a blind person can send an image to a person with sight, who has volunteered to help answer their question. One day, machines will do the volunteer’s job, says Calo, and the same principle could be used in giving the hearing-impaired subtitles for their life."

  • Innocents Exposed as WikiLeaks Gushes Information

    Date published: 
    August 27, 2016

    "There is an ongoing debate over the role of WikiLeaks, which claims to refrain from taking political positions on the information it gathers, noted Albert Gidari, director of privacy at The Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School.

    One argument is that any culpability for harm resulting from the release of private information lies with the governments and private organizations that collect the data in the first place.

  • Clinton backs net neutrality; Trump’s stand is unclear

    Date published: 
    August 27, 2016

    "“The tech community is full of immigrants who started their companies here, so many of them were founded by immigrants,” said Marvin Ammori, a First Amendment lawyer well-known for his work on net neutrality issues who’s general counsel for Hyperloop One, a tech company backed by Elon Musk that’s working on an ultra-fast transit system. “So if you’re anti-immigrant you’re not going to be popular in (Silicon) Valley. If you’re anti-gay you’re not going to be popular in the Valley. ... So it does put Republicans at a disadvantage even if they’re progressive on some tech issues.”

  • Unusual stock move shakes up cyber community

    Date published: 
    August 26, 2016

    "“I wouldn’t say it’s good,” said North­eastern Uni­ver­sity law pro­fessor Andrea Matwyshyn. “I would say it’s inevitable.”

    The action by Muddy Waters was unusual.

    Usu­ally, secu­rity researchers at least try to act in the best inter­ests of device man­u­fac­turers and notify a com­pany in some way of a secu­rity flaw in its prod­ucts. A few sell the bugs to gov­ern­ments who use them in espionage.

  • Here’s how Mexican journalist avoided iPhone spyware hack

    Date published: 
    August 26, 2016

    "“The links for Cabrera, the only word I can put on it is diabolical, as clever as they were evil,” said Geoffrey King, a lawyer and technology program coordinator for the Committee to Protect Journalists, a group that promotes press freedom worldwide."

    Uncovering such flaws in coding “tend to be very expensive and very rare, particularly for Apple because Apple is very good at security,” said King of the Committee to Protect Journalists."

     

  • Singapore launches driverless taxis ahead of Uber and the US

    Date published: 
    August 25, 2016

    ""Singapore's government has been an early and enthusiastic supporter of automated driving, especially as a way of improving urban mobility," said Bryant Walker Smith, professor at the University of South Carolina, and an expert on the legal aspects of self-driving vehicles.

  • Double-winged flying car on the way?

    Date published: 
    August 25, 2016

    "“Just that difference points to the potential for large drones that carry people,” said Stanford robotics expert Bryant Walker Smith.

    Ride-hailing giant Uber, in fact, could become a player in flying-car services, Stanford’s Smith said. “If there’s any company that isn’t going to confine itself to the ground, I’d say it’s Uber,” Smith said."

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