Press

CIS in the news.

  • Internet 'Satan' busted on Staten Island after decades of harassment, cyberstalking

    Date published: 
    April 10, 2017

    "Cyberstalkers often target women, and aim “to hijack the victim's sense of safety," said Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and a cyberstalking expert.

    Stalkers often use lies and impersonation to manipulate internet search engine results, in a bid to destroy their victim’s reputation.

    “It can be hard to get a job and keep a job,” Citron said."

  • Taser’s Latest Body Cams Push Is Unregulated, Unprecedented, and Disturbing

    Date published: 
    April 7, 2017

    "“Axon’s offer creates a perverse incentive for departments to rush into deploying body worn cameras without taking the necessary time to engage with the community and think through many of these hard policy trade-offs before making the snap judgment to go with this free offer,” Yu told Gizmodo. When constructing the necessary regulations, the police departments need to be aware that for every new policy, there is a benefit and a loss."

  • Facebook’s New Plan May Curb Revenge Porn, But Won’t Kill It

    Date published: 
    April 6, 2017

    "To avoid those fiascos, the path forward requires both cooperation and codification. “With mushy categories like ‘extremism,’ you run the risk of censoring political speech or dissent,” says Danielle Citron, who teaches law at the University of Maryland.

  • Government seeks to unmask Trump dissident on Twitter, lawsuit reveals

    Date published: 
    April 6, 2017

    "Jennifer Granick, the director of civil liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, called the government’s behavior “craven” and described the CBP summons as a “classic case of abuse”.

    “For the government, a federal law enforcement officer, to not understand the very basics of protecting free speech and following the rule of law is egregious,” she said.

  • Trump & Co. Just Picked the Wrong Fight With Twitter

    Date published: 
    April 6, 2017

    "“It seems like the government lied to Twitter about why it wanted the information,” says Jennifer Granick, Director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. “It’s not entitled to the information under the statutory authority it cites.”"

  • Facebook takes new steps to stop ‘revenge porn’ images from spreading

    Date published: 
    April 5, 2017

    "Companies can have a tricky time censoring user content in general, said Danielle Citron, a Unviersity of Maryland law professor who has researched online harassment. In this case, Citron said, she believes that the parameters of what constitutes "revenge porn" makes defining what's appropriate and what isn't more clear than having to pass similar judgement on what is, for example, appropriate speech.

  • Privacy rollback can cause headaches for corporate security pros

    Date published: 
    April 4, 2017

    "Omer Tene, vice president of research at the International Association of Privacy Professionals, is less concerned that ISPs will actually violate corporate privacy agreements, but he does recommend use of encryption or a VPN when connecting to corporate resources. “There are bigger threats out there than Verizon,” he says."

  • Self-Driving Cars Raise Questions About Who Carries Insurance

    Date published: 
    April 3, 2017

    "Still, for many years, there will not be a large number of fully driverless cars on the road. So for the most part, says Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina, fault and liability will be determined case by case, as happens after accidents now.

    " 'Who was speeding? Was there a stop sign? What was the weather? Did the vehicle fail?' — and in the future, the same questions will be asked," Smith says, but the difference will be that the tech-savvy cars of the future will gather far more data to help determine fault."

  • Congress rolls back Internet privacy protections

    Date published: 
    April 3, 2017

    "“Your information is very valuable,” said Scott Shackelford, Chair of the Cyber Security at Indiana University, Bloomington. “A lot of people do not treat it that way. We are very used to these days of giving away our private information without being compensated for it.”

    The more of your information that is out there in cyberspace, Shackelford said, the easier it is for you to become a victim of identity theft."

  • How Uber Uses Psychological Tricks to Push Its Drivers’ Buttons

    Date published: 
    April 2, 2017

    "“We’re talking about this kind of manipulation that literally affects people’s income,” said Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington who with Alex Rosenblat has written a paper on the way companies use data and algorithms to exploit psychological weaknesses. Uber officials, he said, are “using what they know about drivers, their control over the interface and the terms of transaction to channel the behavior of the driver in the direction they want it to go.”"

  • Inside the car-eat-car world of self-driving technology

    Date published: 
    March 31, 2017

    "“The money involved — the money expended in these research efforts and the money expected if they’re successful — has just ballooned and become so much more concrete and attainable,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a scholar with Stanford Law School who specializes in self-driving car law."

  • Conundrum stalling Seattle’s body-cam policy

    Date published: 
    March 31, 2017

    "Because of the sensitivity of the issue, the city attorney didn’t want to talk about it on the record. Harlan Yu was open to discussing the issue, however. As a Principal at Upturn — a group studying the impact of technology on public policy — Yu is an expert on body-cam policies as departments across the nation consider how to use them.

  • When self-driving vehicles crash, who's to blame?

    Date published: 
    March 31, 2017

    "Where technology stands today — at level two or below — it’s the driver, said Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant law professor at the University of South Carolina.

    “Anything that’s below level 3, it’s clearly a human that’s supposed to be doing part of the driving,” Smith said.

  • Robot cars: panacea or plague?

    Date published: 
    March 30, 2017

    "“We’re trying to catch things at the right time in their development,” says Ryan Calo, report co-author and law professor in UW’s Tech Policy Lab."

  • 'Unreal when it targets you': Faceless trolls attack online

    Date published: 
    March 29, 2017

    "Danielle Citron, a University of Maryland law professor and author of the book "Hate Crimes in Cyberspace," said some state and federal officials are striving to educate law enforcement on the laws against cyberstalking and online harassment.

    "We have a lot of the tools. We just have to use them, and they're starting to use them," she said.

    Citron became a trolling target herself after she began writing about online harassment in 2008.

    "I was never confronted offline, but I'll be honest: It wasn't fun," she said."

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