Press

CIS in the news.

  • Twitter stirs debate as 'troll' banned over racist abuse

    Date published: 
    July 20, 2016

    "Danielle Citron, a University of Maryland law professor and author of a book "Hate Crimes in Cyberspace," called the incident "a learning moment."

    "I applaud Twitter for its approach in this area," Citron said. "If you chase people offline with racist and intimidating speech, that's too much. Twitter and other platforms are contributing to social norms on free expression.""

  • Google recieved record number of data requests: 4,677 in latest transparency report

    Date published: 
    July 20, 2016

    "Omer Tene, vice president of research and education at the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) noted that European countries such as Germany and France submit significantly more government requests than U.S., relative to the population. “This puts in perspective the concerns of European privacy regulators over data transfers to the U.S.,” he wrote in an email to SCMagazine.com.

  • SS&C Sues Competitor Over Alleged Trade-Secret Violations

    Date published: 
    July 19, 2016

    "That trend is likely to continue, said Annemarie Bridy, a University of Idaho law professor and expert in intellectual property and technology law. "Information is very valuable, and as more and more of the value in our economy is attributable to information and intellectual property, you would expect the control of that information to become more and more contested," Bridy said."

  • Are humans ready for self-driving cars?

    Date published: 
    July 19, 2016

    "“There is a tendency of people to take one ride in one of these vehicles and then conclude that because they have not crashed over the course of 10 minutes that the system must be ready,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina professor who studies the technology."

  • After Apple VS. FBI, GOP Evades Encryption Question

    Date published: 
    July 19, 2016

    "Riana Pfefferkorn, the cryptography fellow at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society, told BuzzFeed News that it’s become standard for both parties to talk about a balance between privacy and law enforcement needs, without taking a real position on encryption.

    “The most troublesome part of this is where it seems to characterize encryption as being, in and of itself, a weapon that can be used ‘to harm us,’” she said. “Given the crucial role of strong encryption in the modern economy, calling encryption a ‘weapon’ is a framing we can’t afford to return to.”"

  • Google: Requests for data rose in second half of 2015

    Date published: 
    July 18, 2016

    "In a blog post, Richard Salgado, Google’s legal director for law enforcement and information security, praised the recent adoption of the Privacy Shield agreement between the United States and the European Union. He also highlighted the Judicial Redress Act, which extends certain privacy protections to citizens of some foreign countries.

  • Tim Berners-Lee slams “manipulative tactics” of telcos on net neutrality

    Date published: 
    July 18, 2016

    "Net neutrality fans are encouraged to add their own personal thoughts to the statement and to “speak from the heart.” The campaign claims that “fast lanes for the highest bidder,” would mean everyone else will end up in a “slow lane,” and also urges BEREC to close loopholes such as “zero-rating or class-based traffic management.”

  • Microsoft Wins Landmark Email Privacy Case

    Date published: 
    July 18, 2016

    "Omer Tene, VP of research and education at the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), welcomed the ruling as a “resounding affirmation of the endurance of privacy in an age marked by constant data transfers in the cloud, Internet of Things and big data applications.”

    “The Court held that even in the cloud, data physically resides on servers in a specific geography, and that government cannot compel a service provider to reach over national borders to deliver data at the expense of customer privacy,” he added."

  • Does Snapchat’s Lenses feature violate Illinois’ biometrics law?

    Date published: 
    July 17, 2016

    "“In this particular case, it's not clear that Snapchat even used face recognition technology in a way that would implicate BIPA,” Yana Welinder, a lawyer and legal fellow with Stanford University, e-mailed. “It's possible that they are simply using face detection technology. If so, that would be similar to what many digital cameras do to identify a face in an image to focus the lens on the face.”"

  • Internet's creator urges net neutrality

    Date published: 
    July 16, 2016

    "Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the world wide web, has written an open letter calling for European citizens to "save the open internet" by joining a public consultation on net neutrality.

    EU regulators are currently working on guidelines surrounding net neutrality - which is the principle that all internet traffic is equal - having voted on new legislation last year.

  • Hyperloop founder, accused of nepotism, to cede voting power

    Date published: 
    July 16, 2016

    "Currently, the clause says the company can pay either the fair market value at the time of repurchase or the price paid by the employee, whichever is lower. At the recent meetings, in response to a question from an employee, general counsel Marvin Ammori said the board plans to authorise changes to that provision, according to people familiar with the matter."

  • Telcos 5G manifesto countered by call to online action

    Date published: 
    July 15, 2016

    "So it’s hardly surprising that the actual  inventor of the World Wide Web (hint, not a telco), Tim Berners-Lee, has chosen this moment to voice fierce opposition to any watering down of the European neutrality rules. He and two US public interest luminaries, Professor Lawrence Lessig and Professor Barbara van Schewick, have written a stiff letter addressed to ‘European citizens, lawmakers and regulators’.

  • Sir Tim Berners-Lee pushes for the closure of EU net neutrality loopholes

    Date published: 
    July 15, 2016

    "Issuing a letter, Berners-Lee hopes to ensure that EU regulation voted upon in October are enacted in full to close loopholes in the law, asking for the public to get involved.

    Alongside Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig and Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick, Berners-Lee said: “Network neutrality for hundreds of millions of Europeans is within our grasp," the letter reads.

  • Sir Tim Berners-Lee calls on Europeans to help 'save the open internet'

    Date published: 
    July 15, 2016

    "However, Sir Tim, along with law professors Barbara van Schewick and Larry Lessig, has urged the public to engage in the consultation, which runs until July 18, in order to pressure regulators into closing what they call “potential loopholes” that could threaten net neutrality.

    “Network neutrality for hundreds of millions of Europeans is within our grasp,” the letter says.

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