Press

CIS in the news.

  • EU data regulation will govern the UK despite Brexit

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2017

    "“If companies start taking data management seriously, they will create a positive response loop that will enhance trust in the digital economy,” says Omer Tene, vice president of research at the IAPP. This is what the ICO, MRS and IAPP, as well as the EU hope, that this legislation will lead to good information governance and install confidence among consumers to continue sharing data."

  • Newly revived lawsuit could reveal secrets of NSA surveillance program

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2017

    "Not only will it likely reveal more about the secret NSA surveillance program, but it could also potentially end such surveillance, explained Jennifer Granick, director of civil liberties at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. “This is a chance for a real challenge to the programmatic nature of the surveillance.”"

  • A Campus Murder Tests Facebook Clicks as Evidence of Hate

    Date published: 
    May 23, 2017

    ""These are not questions the law has had to answer before," says Neil Richards, a professor of First Amendment and privacy law at Washington University School of Law. "We don’t want to permit a system in which merely reading something or associating with other people can be used as strong evidence that you hold the views of the people you hang out with or the things you read.""

  • Nvidia And Waymo Grab Early Lead In First Lap Of Self-Driving Car Race

    Date published: 
    May 22, 2017

    "“Partnerships will be the key to successfully competing on automated driving – and different companies, from automakers to suppliers to data providers to fleet managers to platform developers, can be valuable partners,” Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and research scholar at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, told Forbes."

  • Roaming Charges

    Date published: 
    May 21, 2017

    "That leeway has drawn criticism from academics and civil-liberties advocates. Elizabeth Joh, a University of California, Davis, law professor, said the doctrine is one of two major Fourth Amendment issues that “really calls out for reconsideration.” (The other, she said, is the border-search exception, which lowers Fourth Amendment protections at or near ports of entry.) Both of the main Supreme Court decisions upon which the third-party doctrine is built date back to the 1970s, when telecommunications technology was far less advanced.

  • Microsoft’s Old Software Is Dangerous. Is There a Duty to Fix It?

    Date published: 
    May 20, 2017

    "Cyber law professor Jennifer Granick of Stanford University suggests auto-industry style liability is not appropriate for software.

    "While it is true that companies need to start to prioritize security in coding, it is unreasonable to ask Microsoft to be liable for anything that can be done with the 50 million lines of code in Windows 10," Granick told Fortune by email."

  • Looking Forward to Our Driverless Future

    Date published: 
    May 19, 2017

    "The challenges are legal as well as technological. Bryant Walker Smith, a member of the legal faculty at the University of South Carolina, says that “historically the federal government has regulated new motor vehicle design, while states have regulated these noncommercial drivers and driving. So here we have an instance where the vehicle is becoming the driver, and that tends to blur some of the lines between the federal role and the state role.”"

  • Ransomware attack is why we can't have security backdoors, say privacy advocates

    Date published: 
    May 18, 2017

    "What happened this week won’t be lost on judges in the future should the government again try to get tech companies to build backdoor access into programs,  said Kristen Eichensehr, a law professor at the University of California at Los Angeles with an expertise in national security law and cybersecurity.

    “What we’ve seen happen with WannaCry lends credence to that — and certainly any court is going to take it into account. The government has shown that it itself is persistently incapable of keeping its tools secure,” she said."

  • Jailed for a Facebook post: how US police target critics with arrest and prosecution

    Date published: 
    May 18, 2017

    "“For a country that purports to be guided by democracy and guided by civil rights, this is a very dangerous and very slippery slope,” said Malkia Cyril, the executive director of the Center for Media Justice. “Black activists are expressing anger, rage, hatred even about the conditions that threaten their daily lives, and they are being held liable for how they express that anger, even though they’ve committed no crime.”"

  • How the WannaCry Attack Will Impact Cyber Security

    Date published: 
    May 16, 2017

    "Meanwhile, threats of similar – or perhaps worse – attacks have continued to surface. “This was not the big one. This was a precursor of a far worse attack that will inevitably strike — and it is likely, unfortunately, that [the next] attack will not have a kill switch,” said Andrea M. Matwyshyn, professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University.

  • Can’t Get That Camping Spot? It Could Be Bots

    Date published: 
    May 11, 2017

    "Matwyshyn believes there needs to be space for innovation, but if not everyone has the same access to technology, it raises a lot of questions.

    “That’s a debate that we need to have as a society. And these questions of scraping data and aggregating and reusing [data] are our very entry point to those questions that are going to show up on steroids in the next 10 to 20 years,” says Matwyshyn."

  • Amazon's New Echo Device Will Be Watching

    Date published: 
    May 11, 2017

    "It is inevitable Amazon and others would add a visual component to smart speakers to better monetize them, said Albert Gidari, director for privacy at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society.

    "The question is: What is the screen going to see, and who is going to see it?" Mr. Gidari said. Those are important questions, even with current privacy controls, he said."

  • NSA’s Data Collection Pullback Isn’t as Big a Deal as You Think

    Date published: 
    May 3, 2017

    "“This is a more focused policy by the NSA. It aims to restrict upstream collection to only those communications that directly involve a foreign intelligence target,” said Margaret Hu, an associate professor of law at Washington and Lee University School of Law, in an interview with MeriTalk. “Although it is an important first step, in order to make this type of restriction permanent, it can’t just be a Federal agency’s policy. The NSA could change its mind at any time in the future and go back to collecting Americans’ emails about foreign targets.”"

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