Press

CIS in the news.

  • How Long Can Border Agents Keep Your Email Password?

    Date published: 
    February 27, 2017

    "“Based on the policy and reported incidents, my best guess is that CBP agents have broad discretion to keep login credentials if they think they will have a reason to use them in the future,” said Catherine Crump, a law professor at the University of California, Berkeley who has brought multiple cases against the government’s digital border search policy. “Bottom line: Change your passwords, people!”"

  • Waymo's Fight With Uber Might Be the First Shot in a Self-Driving Car IP War

    Date published: 
    February 24, 2017

    "“For years I’ve warned about a potential automated driving patent war that could rival the notorious smartphone patent war,” says Bryant Walker-Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and an expert in self-driving regulations. As autonomous vehicles transition from amusing gimmicks to money-making products, who controls the key intellectual property could determine which companies thrive and which fall by the wayside."

  • Waymo sues Uber for allegedly stealing self-driving secrets

    Date published: 
    February 23, 2017

    "Since Waymo is alleging intentional patent infringement (among other claims), if it prevails, it could win triple damages, as well as other relief, said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and an expert in self-driving cars.

    The outbreak of a patent war in the nascent field of autonomous vehicles is not surprising, and could eclipse the earlier smartphone patent war, Smith said.

  • Ford wants your new car to pick a song – or tell a joke

    Date published: 
    February 22, 2017

    "Systems like those Ford is researching will become far more vital as auto companies develop autonomous cars, said Bryant Walker Smith, an engineering professor at the University of South Carolina who focuses on the legal aspects of such advanced technology.

    “If you’re going to step it up, an almost necessary part of this requires monitoring the human to make sure they’re monitoring the vehicle,” he said."

  • How Peter Thiel's Palantir Helped the NSA Spy on the Whole World

    Date published: 
    February 22, 2017

    "The former PCAP member who did respond, Stanford privacy scholar Omer Tene, told The Intercept that he was unaware of “any specific relationship, agreement, or project that you’re referring to,” and said he was not permitted to answer whether Palantir’s work with the intelligence community was ever a source of tension with the PCAP. He declined to comment on either the NSA or GCHQ specifically.

  • New master's degree provides practical approaches to policy, legal and ethical cybersecurity issues

    Date published: 
    February 21, 2017

    ""If you speak with policymakers and technical specialists about cybersecurity, they often speak about similar problems but use totally different languages," said Scott Shackelford, associate professor of business law and ethics at IU's Kelley School of Business and director of the Ostrom Workshop Program on Cybersecurity and Internet Governance.

  • How a College Kid Made His Honda Civic Self-Driving for $700

    Date published: 
    February 21, 2017

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina, says that federal and state laws probably don’t pose much of a barrier to those with a desire to upgrade their vehicle to share driving duties. NHTSA has authority over companies selling vehicles and systems used to modify them, but consumers have significant flexibility in making changes to their own vehicle, says Smith, who advises the U.S. Department of Transportation on law and automation."

  • ‘Alexa, Call My Mom!’ — Will The Echo Become A Phone?

    Date published: 
    February 16, 2017

    "We’re headed to a world of embedded sensors in everything, that measure everything, that see everything, that hear everything,” said Albert Gidari, director for privacy at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. “The reality is that technology … kind of blurs law for privacy.”"

  • Regulate That Hairbrush? Cyberlaw Experts Say Maybe

    Date published: 
    February 16, 2017

    "“Seriously, a hairbrush? Do we really need that to be connected to the internet?” LeBlanc asked. Danielle Citron, a nationally known online safety and privacy expert and professor at the University of Maryland’s Francis King Carey School of Law, agreed with him.

    “The problem is that we have everyone rushing to market to network,” Citron said after hearing LeBlanc. “Do we really need to network our underwear” and in the process create so much risk for others, she asked."

  • Congress Could Make Self-Driving Cars Happen—or Ruin Everything

    Date published: 
    February 15, 2017

    "“I’d be wary of dramatic proposals that could create more problems than they solve,” says Bryant Walker Smith, an expert on autonomous vehicles at the University of South Carolina School of Law. After all, this evolving technology permeates so many parts of society: public safety, privacy, the environment, liability and insurance law, employment, urban planning, and more. A law aimed at cutting congestion could tangle with tort law; a clause ensuring passenger privacy could wipe out economic benefits for automakers."

  • What could happen if you refuse to unlock your phone at the US border?

    Date published: 
    February 15, 2017

    "One of House’s lawyers, Catherine Crump, who was then an attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union and now teaches law at the University of California, Berkeley, told Ars that the government claimed House had committed a misdemeanor in violation of 19 US Code Section 507. "They claimed he violated a statute requiring people to provide aid to border officials upon request," she e-mailed. "I am not sure how much of this was government posturing.

  • What Happens When the Computer That Keeps You Alive Can Also Put You In Jail?

    Date published: 
    February 14, 2017

    "Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington who focuses on emerging technologies, said that evidence from devices like pacemakers shouldn’t even be admissible into court. Like DNA evidence before it, Calo said the risk of using it to wrongly implicate someone in a crime is just too high.

    “There’s a tendency to believe that because something is recorded by a machine it is gospel,” Calo said."

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