Press

CIS in the news.

  • Google wants to amend Michigan autonomous vehicle bills

    Date published: 
    September 13, 2016

    ""Who did Michigan want to include in this great project of automated driving? The careful language in that letter could give an advantage to traditional manufacturers," said Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina professor who has studied the legal and regulatory issues surrounding self-driving cars."

  • How Cops Have Turned Baltimore into a Surveillance State

    Date published: 
    September 13, 2016

    "Elizabeth Joh, a law professor at the University of California Davis who specializes in policing and technology, told me that while police secrecy is nothing new, the kind of dragnet surveillance that Baltimore has engaged in—where officers aren't necessarily looking for one particular person, or conducting a specific investigation—raises serious political issues. "You need to balance some legitimate police needs with the idea that police may just have too much information on innocent people," Joh said. "And that's a real struggle for people in a democracy to figure out.

  • Why scientists must share their research code

    Date published: 
    September 13, 2016

    "Many scientists worry over the reproducibility of wet-lab experiments, but data scientist Victoria Stodden's focus is on how to validate computational research: analyses that can involve thousands of lines of code and complex data sets.

  • When an app tells companies you’re pregnant but not that you miscarried

    Date published: 
    September 12, 2016

    “The way privacy law largely works for consumers in the United States is through what regulators call ‘notice and choice,'” said Samford University law professor Woodrow Hartzog by email. “That means that so long as users were put on notice of an app’s data practices and made the choice to continue using the app in light of that notice, then the app’s data practices are presumptively permissible.”

     

     

  • Musk Says Tesla’s New Autopilot Could Have Saved Driver

    Date published: 
    September 11, 2016

    "Though controversial, Tesla’s use of such so-called fleet learning is exciting and will allow the technology to progress much faster, said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who has written extensively on driverless-car liability. Tesla’s growing fleet of autopilot-enabled cars -- at least 90,000 -- are driving roughly 1.5 million miles each day.

  • For some safety experts, Uber’s self-driving taxi test isn’t something to hail

    Date published: 
    September 11, 2016

    "Cohen and Bryant Walker Smith, an autonomous-vehicle expert at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, are both comfortable with the tests because of the safety drivers. Still, they acknowledged that doesn’t mean it will be collision-free. “You’re not going to have perfection. There is going to be trial and error, and it’s not going to be problem free,” Cohen said.

  • Driverless car bills speed through Michigan Senate

    Date published: 
    September 8, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who studies self-driving car regulation, called the bills “a mixed bag.”

    “Critically, they are in desperate need of clarification followed by thoughtful discussion,” he said.

    Walker Smith said the bills do a good job of allowing autonomous vehicles on the road, but much of the language becomes confusing and difficult to differentiate from current laws.

  • The Lawyer Protecting Your First Amendment Rights

    Date published: 
    September 8, 2016

    "When a federal civil rights case accusing a Yale professor of sexual misconduct landed on BuzzFeed reporter Katie Baker’s desk, the words that had dominated much of her writing so far resurfaced: “sexual misconduct,” “harassment

  • Microsoft’s Top Lawyer Becomes a Civil Rights Crusader

    Date published: 
    September 8, 2016

    "Challenging the government over the scope of search warrants may seem like administrative arcana next to causes that get crowds of protesters onto the streets. But there is a connection between Microsoft’s court cases and other civil rights battles, says Neil Richards, a law professor at Washington University. Protest movements can’t form, he says, unless people with unconventional ideas can communicate and organize without the government looking over their shoulder.

  • Michigan moves forward with autonomous vehicle testing

    Date published: 
    September 7, 2016

    "But Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law who has studied the legal impact of self-driving cars, said that some of the bills could protect automakers from ride-sharing competition from companies such as Google, Apple or other technology developers.

  • When your driverless car crashes, who will be responsible? The answer remains unclear

    Date published: 
    September 7, 2016

    ""Liability is a poorly understood word," said Bryant Walker Smith, one of the leading experts in the legal aspects of autonomous driving. "It can refer to criminal liability (who is convicted of a felony or misdemeanor), quasi-criminal liability (who gets the speeding ticket), and civil liability (who has to pay for the harm they caused to someone else). In addition, only rarely are any of these forms of liability binary: Just because one actor is liable doesn't mean that another actor isn't.""

  • Multinational Companies Remain Wary of U.S.-EU Data-Transfer Pact

    Date published: 
    September 6, 2016

    "Legal experts offered several reasons why companies aren’t embracing Privacy Shield, including the possibility that it, too, will be invalidated. “There is a legal uncertainty of the future of this arrangement because we saw what happened with Safe Harbor,” saidOmer Tene, vice president of research at the International Association of Privacy Professionals.

  • What will keep your self-driving car from killing you in the future?

    Date published: 
    September 1, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law, tells Inverse that each of those vehicle types has its own set of rules to follow.

    “The way law applies to Tesla’s Autopilot is different from how law applies to Uber’s supervised automated driving, and it’s different from how law might apply to a truly driverless shuttle,” Smith says. “That matters because really the devil is in the details.”

  • Survey: 34% of privacy pros expect their companies to certify under Privacy Shield

    Date published: 
    September 1, 2016

    "Omer Tene, VP of Research and Education at the IAPP, suggested in an interview with SCMagazine.com that companies may be disinclined to jump through the regulatory hoops required for Privacy Shield certification, with the looming prospect of the courts finding this policy lacking as they did with Safe Harbor. “Companies might be thinking… it may not be worth going through the exercise to begin with,” said Tene.

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