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  • Should Apple Help Customers Hide Personal Info From Government?

    Date published: 
    February 25, 2016

    ""Can you force Apple to design their product in a particular way and that also could have a speech component?" wondered Ryan Calo, an assistant professor at the University of Washington School of Law. "If what's being compelled here is a change to the way we speak, then it's not the company and its bits and bytes at issue — it's yours and mine.""

  • Protecting the Open Internet

    Date published: 
    February 25, 2016

    Q: What does net neutrality mean?

    A: Net neutrality is a principle that has allowed the Internet to serve as a platform for free speech, innovation and economic growth. According to that principle, Internet service providers like Verizon or Comcast that connect us to the Internet should not control what happens on the Internet. That means that ISPs should not have the power to block or slow down websites, make some sites more attractive than others, or charge Internet companies fees to reach people faster. 

  • Google, Facebook Among Those Preparing To Sign Court Filing In Support Of Apple

    Date published: 
    February 25, 2016

    "“I think it’s fair to say there’s an extraordinary amount of support for Apple right now,” said Andrew Bridges, a partner at the law firm Fenwick & West LLP who has represented Google in the past. Bridges said he was in touch “with a number of companies” interested in signing onto a brief supporting Apple, but declined to say which ones.

  • Driverless Cars Brave Mean City Streets

    Date published: 
    February 24, 2016

    "All of these companies' efforts fall into one of two kinds of technologies, said Bryant Walker Smith, an engineer and lawyer at the University of South Carolina: cars that do something everywhere or cars that do everything somewhere.

    "The current state of technology," Smith said, "is that we don't have vehicles that can do all of the driving all of the time." Vehicles like those at Gateway will be limited to specific conditions, community, and geography. Those vehicles require slow speed, simplified environment, and some form of supervision.

  • Pourquoi Apple invoque la liberté d’expression face au FBI

    Date published: 
    February 24, 2016

    "Le premier amendement protège la liberté d’expression, qui comprend également “le droit de ne pas s’exprimer”, explique aux “Echos” Rianna Pfefferkorn, chercheuse spécialisée en cryptographie et vie privée à l’école de droit de Stanford.

  • What's At Stake In Apple/FBI Fight: Who Gets To Set The Rules That Govern Your Privacy & Security

    Date published: 
    February 24, 2016

    "Lots of people, mainly those supporting the DOJ/FBI's view of the Apple fight, have been arguing that this isn't a big deal. They're just asking for one small thing. Other people have tried to examine "what's at stake" in the case, with a number of the arguments falling into the typical "privacy v. security" framing, or even something around precedents related to privacy and security. However, Jennifer Granick recently wrote a great piece that does a much better job framing what's truly at stake. It's not privacy vs.

  • Meet Marc Zwillinger: Apple's secret weapon in its battle against the FBI

    Date published: 
    February 24, 2016

    "“When they leave, they all recognize the extraordinary power the government has,” said Albert Gidari, a recently retired privacy lawyer who worked with Google and referred Zwillinger to Apple. Zwillinger sends Gidari brownies each holiday season as a thank you.

    “They know from their time on hand that power can be abused,” Gidari said."

  • Apple's Best Arguments Against the U.S. Over iPhone Access

    Date published: 
    February 24, 2016

    "Indeed, the act wasn’t meant to lead to new lawmaking, said Jeffrey Vagle, executive director of the Center for Technology, Innovation and Competition at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. One could argue that compelling a company to produce something -- code, for instance -- effectively does just that.

    But the dearth of applicable case law is a problem for this argument, Vagle said. The New York Telephone ruling set a strong precedent that communications firms had a duty to “provide technical assistance.”"
  • Apple to tell judge in California case: Congress must decide

    Date published: 
    February 23, 2016

    "The U.S. has used the All Writs Act at least three times — most recently in 1980 — to compel a phone company to provide a list of dialed numbers, but in those cases the technology and tools already existed, said Jennifer Granick, an attorney and director of civil liberties and the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

    “This is a terrorism investigation that’s solved. We know who did it,” Granick said. “What happens so often is we do something that’s justified for terrorism, but it’s going to get used in regular, run-of-the-mill cases.”"
  • Apple-FBI Fight Asks: Is Code Protected as Free Speech?

    Date published: 
    February 23, 2016

    ""The signature is part of Apple’s security ecosystem; it’s a promise that Apple believes this code is safe for you to run," said Jennifer Granick, director of civil liberties at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society. "The phone doesn’t run software that Apple hasn’t signed."

    “This debate is so important and it’s critical that we get it right,” said Neil Richards, a law professor at Washington University in St. Louis.

  • Trai first regulator in world to focus on differential pricing: Barbara van Schewick

    Date published: 
    February 22, 2016

    "Barbara van Schewick is the director of the Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society. Her research and papers on network neutrality shaped the US Federal Communications Commission's work and rulings on the issue. In a Skype interview with Kim Arora, she spoke about the latest Trai decision and net neutrality around the world.

    How would you compare the TRAI ruling in India with net neutrality legislations elsewhere in the world?

  • Apple’s Standoff with the FBI: Will Consumer Privacy Prevail?

    Date published: 
    February 22, 2016

    "According to Jeffrey Vagle, a lecturer in law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and executive director of the school’s Center for Technology, Innovation & Competition, the FBI’s request “seems innocuous.” It relates to one phone that didn’t even belong to the shooter but to his employer, and that employer has already granted the government access to search the phone, he noted.

  • Apple Ruling Poses Grave Danger to Investor's Privacy Rights

    Date published: 
    February 22, 2016

    "It has been reported that the Director of Civil Liberties at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, Jennifer Granick, said, “This is a new frontier. I know of no other statutory provision that would arguably create an obligation for device manufacturers to help out government.”"

  • Giving names to online harassment

    Date published: 
    February 21, 2016

    "Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland, has specialised in cyber law and advised social media companies on how to shape their policies on abuse or harassment. Describing the project as "incredibly important", she says it is particularly encouraging as a means to educate law enforcement.

    "The problem is people come to them, they're great with street crimes, but tracking down a poster is foreign to them. I'm not criticising them, but we need education."

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