Of Interest

  • Smart TVs are spying on you through your phone

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2018

    ""It looks like it will put some restrictions on the sale of personal information, but there doesn't seem to be anything there limiting the collection of any kind," said Jennifer King, director of consumer privacy at the Center for Internet and Society at the Stanford Law School. "In some ways, we're still in the status quo with a little more power that our data not be sold.""

  • Having more control over your data doesn't mean it's safe

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2018

    "Working out those details is important, because many companies that collect personal data continue making "fundamental mistakes" in how they protect it, said Richard Forno, assistant director of the UMBC Center for Cybersecurity.

    "In 2018, we should not be seeing these types of incidents and breaches," he said.

  • Facebook Found “Hate Speech” in the Declaration of Independence

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2018

    "Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland who works with Facebook’s non-consensual intimate images advisory group in an unpaid capacity, says that the episode could point to the limits of algorithms in flagging hate speech. Hate speech is about context, she says, which algorithms struggle to detect.

  • Outsmarted by a Smart TV? Not This Reporter.

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2018

    "The experience illustrated how difficult it is to discover how companies may be tracking people on their televisions, which many advertisers see as the final frontier of consumer data. “When you’re thinking about buying a TV, you’re thinking about the resolution, the color depth, you think about the price,” said Jonathan Mayer, an assistant professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University and a former technology adviser at the Federal Communications Commission.

  • Is Facebook a publisher? In public it says no, but in court it says yes

    Date published: 
    July 3, 2018

    "Daphne Keller, of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, said Section 230 was designed to allow platforms like Facebook to do some moderation and make editorial decisions without generally being liable for users’ posts: “They need to be able to make discretionary choices about content.”

    The law seemed to be on Facebook’s side, she said, but added that it was an unusual case given the focus on app data access while previous cases have centered on more straightforward censorship claims."

  • Facebook, Cambridge probe widens

    Date published: 
    July 3, 2018

    "Aleecia McDonald, an assistant professor at Carnegie Mellon University, said in an interview that it’s “a typical path for California to pass privacy laws that are passed by other states.” “It’s a great place to experiment,” she added."

  • Lyft to acquire Ford GoBike, follows Uber’s footsteps

    Date published: 
    July 2, 2018

    "Lyft’s acquisition of Motivate is merely one more step in the ride-hailing industry’s march toward increased dominance in the shared-vehicle market, whether that’s bikes or cars, said Bryant Walker Smith, an affiliate scholar at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. In part, that’s a response to the changing nature of city living and the increasing desire from customers to have more choice and flexibility in the way they move around, he said.

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