Of Interest

  • Schiff Calls ‘Deepfakes’ a Nightmarish Threat to 2020 Elections

    Date published: 
    June 13, 2019

    "The law currently exempts online platforms such as Facebook for most content its users post, but Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland who testified, said the immunity should be preserved only for those that employ "reasonable content moderation practices."

    "There are some sites that literally traffic in abuse, that encourage illegality, but they should not enjoy immunity from liability," Citron said, adding that she has advised Facebook and Twitter Inc. as best practices have emerged in recent years."

  • Tackling the ‘Deep Fake,’ House Grasps for Solution to Doctored Videos

    Date published: 
    June 13, 2019

    "Sharing Ayyub’s story with the committee, University of Maryland law professor Danielle Citron noted that the journalist awoke to find her  face had been superimposed on the body of a woman in porno in April 2018, less than 24 hours after an appearance on BBC and Al Jazeera in which she condemned Indian religious leaders who had advocated on behalf of defendants involved in an 8-year-old’s gang rape and murder.

  • House holds hearing on "deepfakes" and artificial intelligence amid national security concerns

    Date published: 
    June 13, 2019

    "Danielle Citron, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, testified that there's no finite way to stop deepfakes from spreading, but said a combination of "law, markets and societal resiliences" are necessary to get resolution. 

    "But law has a modest role to play," Citron conceded. She explained that victims in civil claims can sue for defamation or emotional distress from the videos, but added that it's "incredibly expensive to sue and criminal law offers too few levers for us to push."

  • Opening Brief to the Ninth Circuit re Motion to Unseal (Facebook Messenger)

    Author(s): 
    Jennifer Granick
    Riana Pfefferkorn
    Publication Date: 
    June 12, 2019
    Publication Type: 
    Litigation Brief

    Opening brief of Movants-Appellants EFF, ACLU, and Riana Pfefferkorn to the Ninth Circuit in our appeal from the district court's denial of our motion to unseal filings in a sealed case wherein the Department of Justice allegedly sought to compel Facebook to comply with a wiretap order for Facebook's end-to-end encrypted voice calling app, Messenger. 

  • We Read 150 Privacy Policies. They Were an Incomprehensible Disaster.

    Date published: 
    June 12, 2019

    "“You’re confused into thinking these are there to inform users, as opposed to protect companies,” said Albert Gidari, the consulting director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

    According to Jen King, the director of consumer privacy at the Center for Internet and Society, this doesn’t mean we should throw out privacy policies entirely — we just need a fresh start.

  • Apple Pledges Privacy, Beefs Up Security

    Date published: 
    June 12, 2019

    ""I think there is a lot of pressure on the data companies from a lot of different directions," says Omer Tene, vice president and chief knowledge officer at the International Association of Privacy Professionals. "Apple will continue to be the most aggressive proponent of privacy as it provides them a competitive advantage."

    Yet, whether technology companies that provide services for free can wean themselves off of data remains to be seen, the EFF's Hoffman-Andrews says.

  • This viral Schwarzenegger deepfake isn't just entertaining. It's a warning.

    Date published: 
    June 12, 2019

    "Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and author of “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace,” is scheduled to testify before the House Intel Committee’s deepfake panel to talk about potential ways — including legislation — to stop deepfakes that could affect elections, personal lives and businesses.

  • Big Tech's timid deepfake defense

    Date published: 
    June 12, 2019

    ""A deepfake could cause a riot; it could tip an election; it could crash an IPO. And if it goes viral, [social media companies] are responsible," says Danielle Citron, a UMD law professor who has written extensively about deepfakes."

  • Want to See My Genes? Get a Warrant

    Author(s): 
    Elizabeth Joh
    Publication Date: 
    June 11, 2019
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    Someone broke into a church in Centerville, Utah, last November and attacked the organist who was practicing there. In March, after a conventional investigation came up empty, a police detective turned to forensic consultants at Parabon NanoLabs. Using the publicly accessible website GEDmatch, the consultants found a likely distant genetic relative of the suspect, whose blood sample had been found near the church’s broken window.

  • Alexandria rape suspect challenging DNA search used to crack case

    Date published: 
    June 10, 2019

    "Elizabeth E. Joh, who teaches policing and technology at the University of California at Davis School of Law, said she thinks legislation is needed to establish limits to law enforcement’s use of DNA.

    “There’s very little in the way of rules in terms of what’s permitted and what isn’t,” she said. “It’s still relatively new, and the kind of cases that have thus far been solved are the kinds of cases I think most people want to have solved. But that doesn’t answer the question of what the limits should be on what the government can do.”"

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