Of Interest

  • Apple’s New Privacy Technology May Pressure Competitors to Better Protect Our Data

    Date published: 
    August 3, 2016

    "Arvind Narayanan, an assistant professor at Princeton University, is hopeful that Apple’s privacy stand will pressure other companies to follow suit. The popularity of Snapchat’s disappearing messages, and the occasional outcry when a company is caught doing something that looks unseemly, show that people do care about privacy, even if the tech industry provides few opportunities to express that, he says.

  • Video: Protecting journalism (not just journalists) takes tech that's safe for everyone

    On July 23rd, CPJ Staff Technologist Tom Lowenthal gave a presentation as part of the HOPE XI hacker conference at the Hotel Pennsylvania in New York City. Tom's talk, entitled “Won’t Somebody Please Think of the Journalists‽” described the challenges of protecting journalists in a world where journalism is no longer conducted only by professionals. Tom exhorted the technologists and developers in attendance to build tools which account for the distinctive needs of journalism and which protect their users when they are engaged in acts of journalism.

  • Pittsburgh police release body-cam policy synopsis

    Date published: 
    August 3, 2016

    "Release of the synopsis was not enough to satisfy the Washington, D.C.-based Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and Upturn, a technology consultant, which Tuesday released a report that gave Pittsburgh low marks for its transparency on body-worn cameras. The groups said Pittsburgh was one of only three U.S. police departments of the 50 it surveyed whose policy could not be found in the public domain. The others were Detroit and Aurora, Colo.

  • Chicago Police body camera policies score high

    Date published: 
    August 2, 2016

    "Harlan Yu, a principal at Upturn, said the discussion of when an officer should turn on a body camera is extremely important after O’Neal’s death.  

    “Looking at Chicago’s policies, or at least the policies itself, it fully satisfied our criteria,” Yu said. “Presumably, in that situation, the officer was required to have the camera on. Obviously, the question is whether an officer violates that policy, what procedures are in place and what does the department do in those cases. I think that remains to be seen.”"

  • Arizona police agencies get low marks for body camera policies

    Date published: 
    August 2, 2016

    "“They got six red and two yellows and no greens, so I think hopefully this scorecard helps community advocates in Phoenix identify areas where the department policies could improve,” said Harlan Yu, a principal technologist at Upturn, the consulting firm that helped create the report.

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