Of Interest

  • Inside Story: Weighing the top-story contenders in a wild 2018

    Date published: 
    December 14, 2018

    "Peter Asaro, associate professor, School of Media Studies at The New School said, “The degree to which social media has shaped public consciousness and the degree to which that can be influenced by bad actors, whether that’s Russia or whether that’s political interests or whether that’s economic interests or just conspiracy theorists or what-have-you. And I think there’s a real reckoning that’s going to take place in terms of journalistic integrity, information integrity, and how do we understand what truth is in this new media world.”"

  • It's Time to Plan for How Quantum Computing Could Go Wrong, Say Entrepreneurs and Physicists

    Date published: 
    December 13, 2018

    "Patrick Lin, philosophy professor and director of the Ethics and Emerging Sciences Group at California Polytechnic State University, told Gizmodo that it could be hard to predict what consequences quantum computing will have. “We need to be very careful about taking action, i.e., creating policy, if much is still unknown,” he said, but added that we should be prepared to take action once an issue does pop up. And, given the global nature of physics research despite national political interests, it will likely take international agreement in order to tackle the issues, Lin said.

  • The U.S. often takes hostages in trade fights. They usually aren’t live human beings

    Author(s): 
    Henry Farrell
    Publication Date: 
    December 12, 2018
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    The United States, like other countries, frequently uses the tactic of hostage taking in trade disputes. When it imposes punitive tariffs against another country, it very often targets politically sensitive products to put more pressure on the government. At the World Trade Organization, it is refusing to agree to the appointment of new judges, to try to force other WTO members to accede to its demands.

  • Britain has plunged into Brexit chaos. Here are the key facts.

    Author(s): 
    Henry Farrell
    Publication Date: 
    December 12, 2018
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    Over the past few days, Britain has entered into a major political crisis. Negotiators for the Conservative Party government made a deal with European Union negotiators over the Brexit process. However, the deal was unacceptable to the Democratic Unionist Party, which the government relies on for support, as well as to the Labour Party and many members of the Conservative Party. Now rebel Conservatives have gathered the necessary votes to challenge the leadership of Prime Minister Theresa May. How did this happen, and what happens next?

  • Privacy groups urge tech firms to sign Safe Face Pledge to restrict use of facial recognition

    Date published: 
    December 12, 2018

    "While employees and customers can pressure companies to act ethically with regard to AI, more attention needs to be focused on laws and government oversight, said Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington, who is on the board of AI Now and gets funding from Microsoft. Without broad regulation, if some companies refuse to sell the software, others will step in.

  • Cellular Carriers Get More Control Over Text Messages

    Date published: 
    December 12, 2018

    "“This decision opens up the landscape for cellular providers to become bigger advertising platforms in the future based on knowing whom you text and scanning the content of your messages,” says Albert Gidari, director of privacy for the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School."

Pages

Subscribe to Of Interest