Of Interest

  • When an app tells companies you’re pregnant but not that you miscarried

    Date published: 
    September 12, 2016

    “The way privacy law largely works for consumers in the United States is through what regulators call ‘notice and choice,'” said Samford University law professor Woodrow Hartzog by email. “That means that so long as users were put on notice of an app’s data practices and made the choice to continue using the app in light of that notice, then the app’s data practices are presumptively permissible.”

     

     

  • For some safety experts, Uber’s self-driving taxi test isn’t something to hail

    Date published: 
    September 11, 2016

    "Cohen and Bryant Walker Smith, an autonomous-vehicle expert at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, are both comfortable with the tests because of the safety drivers. Still, they acknowledged that doesn’t mean it will be collision-free. “You’re not going to have perfection. There is going to be trial and error, and it’s not going to be problem free,” Cohen said.

  • Musk Says Tesla’s New Autopilot Could Have Saved Driver

    Date published: 
    September 11, 2016

    "Though controversial, Tesla’s use of such so-called fleet learning is exciting and will allow the technology to progress much faster, said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who has written extensively on driverless-car liability. Tesla’s growing fleet of autopilot-enabled cars -- at least 90,000 -- are driving roughly 1.5 million miles each day.

  • Stupid Patent of the Month: Elsevier Patents Online Peer Review

    On August 30, 2016, the Patent Office issued U.S. Patent No. 9,430,468, titled; “Online peer review and method.” The owner of this patent is none other than Elsevier, the giant academic publisher. When it first applied for the patent, Elsevier sought very broad claims that could have covered a wide range of online peer review. Fortunately, by the time the patent actually issued, its claims had been narrowed significantly. So, as a practical matter, the patent will be difficult to enforce.

  • Microsoft’s Top Lawyer Becomes a Civil Rights Crusader

    Date published: 
    September 8, 2016

    "Challenging the government over the scope of search warrants may seem like administrative arcana next to causes that get crowds of protesters onto the streets. But there is a connection between Microsoft’s court cases and other civil rights battles, says Neil Richards, a law professor at Washington University. Protest movements can’t form, he says, unless people with unconventional ideas can communicate and organize without the government looking over their shoulder.

  • The Lawyer Protecting Your First Amendment Rights

    Date published: 
    September 8, 2016

    "When a federal civil rights case accusing a Yale professor of sexual misconduct landed on BuzzFeed reporter Katie Baker’s desk, the words that had dominated much of her writing so far resurfaced: “sexual misconduct,” “harassment

  • When Toasters Attack: 5 Steps to Improve the Security of Things

    Author(s): 
    Scott Shackelford
    Publication Date: 
    September 8, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    There is a great deal of buzz surrounding the Internet of Things (IoT), which is the notion, simply put, that nearly everything not currently connected to the Internet from gym shorts to streetlights soon will be. The rise of “smart products” holds the promise to revolutionize business and society. Applications are seemingly endless.

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