Of Interest

  • It’s time to get rid of the Facebook “news feed,” because it’s not news

    Date published: 
    November 18, 2016

    "Facebook's highly personalized algorithmic curation of its users' newsfeeds falls in a legal gray area with respect to CDA 230. As you know, CDA 230 provides immunity for "interactive computer services," drawing a line between that category and "information content providers." But it's not entirely clear when the former becomes the latter; in other words, it's not clear when an intermediary engages in enough editing of third-party content that it becomes an "information content provider" and loses CDA 230 immunity.

  • Interconnectedness and Manufacturer Responsibility in Automated Vehicles

    Date published: 
    November 18, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law and (by courtesy) the School of Engineering, and Affiliate Scholar, Center of Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, argues that AVs and many other products are now connected to their manufacturers in ways that permit the manufacturers to maintain "information, access and control over the products, product users and product uses" in ways that can "expand the legal obligations and liabilities of automotive companies toward people harmed by their ­products."

  • Points of Consensus on Rule 41

    Senator Chris Coons, Democrat from Delaware, offered a bill today that would delay implementation of proposed changes to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 41 for six months. Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society and Mozilla have been studying issues related to government hacking including the Rule 41 changes.

  • Anti-Defamation League Task Force Issues Recommendations to Stem Hate That Surged on Social Media During 2016 Presidential Campaign

    Date published: 
    November 17, 2016

    "Danielle Citron, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland and member of the Task Force added, “The ADL Task Force lays out important suggestions for platforms that harmonize with their commitment to free expression. It wisely offers strategies for enhancing the transparency and fairness of the reporting process, expanding opportunities for bystanders to assist victims, and building anti-harassment tools into platforms.”"

  • Thai Website Shutdowns Soar After King's Death

    Date published: 
    November 17, 2016

    "Daphne Keller at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society said internet companies doing business in countries with laws restricting speech know they will be expected to comply with the rules. One common means of doing so without deleting lawful speech elsewhere is to offer country-specific versions of services, like YouTube Thailand, said Keller.

    "The company can then honor national law on the version of the service that is targeted to, and primarily used in, that country," she said."

  • Can You Crash An Autonomous Car Ethically?

    Date published: 
    November 16, 2016

    "“These are decisions that need to be thought about or programmed in advance,” said Patrick Lin, director of the Ethics and Emerging Sciences Group at California Polytechnic State University. “Either way leads to problems.” In either case, you’re targeting a vehicle class through no fault of its own."

  • Exploring Augmented Reality (Past Event)

    November 16, 2016
    Washington, D.C.

    U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, will convene a hearing on Wednesday, November 16, 2016, at 3:00 p.m. entitled “Exploring Augmented Reality.” The hearing will examine the emergence, benefits, and implications of augmented reality technologies. Unlike virtual reality that creates a wholly simulated reality, augmented reality attempts to superimpose images and visual data on the physical world in an intuitive way.  

    Witnesses:

    •    Mr. Brian Blau, Research Vice President, Gartner

  • Google patent shows vision of self-driving cars flocking to pick up customers

    Date published: 
    November 15, 2016

    "“You could see Google as an operator of these networks, either directly owning and operating the vehicles, or closely partnered with another entity or entities that does,” said Stanford School of Law professor and autonomous-vehicle expert Bryant Walker Smith. For production of self-driving cars, Google would probably work with a carmaker, Smith said.

  • Donald Trump is about to control the most powerful surveillance machine in history

    Date published: 
    November 14, 2016

    "Secrecy is crucial because it enables more invasive and disruptive forms of surveillance, according to University of Washington Professor Ryan Calo, who has written extensively on the topic. As long as surveillance programs are secret, it’s nearly impossible to hold them in check — and without a steady stream of whistleblowers, any new programs are likely to stay secret. As Calo told The Verge, “It’s very difficult for the public to resist surveillance that they don’t know about.”"

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