Of Interest

  • Michigan Just Passed the Most Permissive Self-Driving Car Laws in the Country

    Date published: 
    December 9, 2016

    "Still, there are some questions about the clarity of the language in SB 995 and , according to Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor of law and engineering at the University of South Carolina and a scholar at Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School. “The language is so unclear that I can’t even say what it actually does,” Smith said in an email, adding that while the final laws did change they are “still a mess.”

  • Michigan gets forward-thinking self-driving laws

    Date published: 
    December 9, 2016

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina law professor who closely follows the legal issues tied to self-driving technology, said that particular bill is “somewhat confusing because it would seem to subvert many proposed restrictions on research tests and on-demand automated motor vehicle networks.”"

  • Michigan lets autonomous cars on roads without human driver

    Date published: 
    December 9, 2016

    "But Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who tracks the technology, says Florida has almost no restrictions. Other states, he said, don't expressly prohibit such testing and have agreements with individual companies to do it. Michigan's laws also make defining who is a driver ambiguous, he said. Drivers could be companies running autonomous taxi services, engineers who start autonomous vehicles, passengers who ride in the cars and the automated systems themselves, he said."

  • Michigan Just Embraced the Driverless Future

    Date published: 
    December 9, 2016

    "“As near as I can tell from the language and the context, what’s going on is a specific effort to implement a specific regime for a specific company,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a legal scholar with the University of South Carolina School of Law who studies self-driving vehicles.

  • The political fight behind Facebook and Google’s new terrorist content database

    Date published: 
    December 8, 2016

    "“[The database] is definitely responsive to what’s going on in Europe,” says Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland, who specializes in cyber law and harassment. “What you’re finding is just a manifestation of this code of conduct from May, coupled with pressure from the United Kingdom and European Union.”"

  • The Intersection of Technology, Oversight, and Legitimacy in 21st Century Policing

    After another year of protests and unrest across the country, criminal justice reform remains a contentious issue. Some cities have experienced an increase in homicide rates, police departments are under intense scrutiny for their handling of police shootings, and prisoners are protesting living conditions. Meanwhile, policymakers are making scant progress to roll back mass incarceration.

  • CEIPI Opinion on a EU Proposal for a Neighboring Right for Press Publishers Online

    At CEIPI, I have co-authored with Christophe Geiger and Oleksandr Bulayenko a position paper discussing the proposed introduction in EU law of neighboring rights for press publishers for the digital uses of their publications. The proposal is included in the European Commission’s Draft Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market of September 14, 2016. Below you find the summary of the paper:

  • What Elaine Chao as Transportation secretary could mean for commercial drone use

    Date published: 
    December 6, 2016

    "Ryan Calo, an assistant professor of law at the University of Washington who specializes in robotics law and policy, said fewer regulations could benefit some specific drone industries, such as delivery. That potential enterprise has been hindered by regulations that prevent drones from carrying packages unless the total weight of the drone plus the load is less than 55 pounds, as well as limitations on flying beyond visual line of sight."

  • Instagram is the latest social media firm to tweak its app in an attempt to prevent harassment

    Date published: 
    December 6, 2016

    "Danielle Citron, professor of law at the University of Maryland, welcomes the changes because she said they give users more control over the content with which they interact. She noted that Instagram is merely catching up with policies already in place at Facebook. 

    “The most important thing is educating users about what is acceptable on the site,” Citron said. 

    She added that tech companies have come a long way in moderating user behavior, but that they can be more sophisticated and clear in their approach to what constitutes harassment."

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