Of Interest

  • 'Sony Research Award Program' Continues for Fourth Year

    Date published: 
    July 15, 2019

    ""Many technology companies have joined industry initiatives on AI ethics, but Sony has taken the extra step to support independent academic study on that subject," said Dr. Patrick Lin, Professor of Philosophy and Director for the Ethics & Emerging Sciences Group, California Polytechnic State University. "Not only does this show thought-leadership in ethics, but it's also a testament to Sony's commitment to social responsibility.""

  • Denver-area neighborhoods are installing license plate readers to record every vehicle that passes by

    Date published: 
    July 9, 2019

    "“We can’t begin to fathom how fast we’re moving to a ‘Star Trek’ world,” said Albert Gidari, consulting director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

    The cameras themselves aren’t necessarily a violation of privacy, said Gidari, the Stanford privacy expert. They are collecting images of people traveling in public, where people implicitly give consent to being seen and photographed, he said.

  • Adapting Advertising Infrastructure for Content Regulation: WIPO’s BRIP Blacklist

    In the name of “brand safety,” advertisers these days are working hard to better control where their ads appear online. Programmatic advertising with real-time bidding automates the process of online ad buying and ad placement to such an extent that the entire process takes place in the time it takes a web page to load. The process is highly efficient, but a significant downside is that ads sometimes appear alongside controversial content with which an advertiser would rather not be associated. Online pornography is the classic example, but other strains of extreme content—e.g., hate speech, conspiracism, and incitement-to-terrorism—have more recently come into focus for advertisers as threats to brand reputation.

  • Australia’s anti-encryption bill is allowing the government to openly spy on journalists

    Date published: 
    July 8, 2019

    "Riana Pfefferkorn, associate director of surveillance and cybersecurity at Stanford Center for Internet and Society, pointed out that this undermines the protection granted to journalists under other national security laws.

    The data retention legislation, in fact, had a niche for journalists that imposed law enforcement to have a specific warrant for journalists. In a personal submission to the review, Pfefferkorn said that the combination of the new powers de facto invalidates the need to obtain a specific warrant.

  • Expert: The AFP used our new anti-encryption laws to raid the ABC

    Date published: 
    July 8, 2019

    "As The Guardian has already noted, cybersecurity expert Riana Pfefferkorn has taken umbrage with the process, adding a personal submission to the parliamentary review, claiming that the AFP’s actions subverted the existing protections offered to journalists, and more accurately, that the new laws removed the need for a warrant.

  • Australia's anti-encryption laws being used to bypass journalist protections, expert says

    Date published: 
    July 8, 2019

    "This undermined protections granted to journalists under other national security legislation, said cybersecurity researcher Riana Pfefferkorn, an associate director of surveillance and cybersecurity at the Stanford Centre for Internet and Society.

    Data retention legislation passed in 2015 had a carve-out for journalists that required law enforcement to obtain a special journalist information warrant, but Pfefferkorn said in a personal submission to the review that the combination of the new powers meant the information warrant need not be obtained.

  • Seeing Is Believing

    Date published: 
    July 3, 2019

    "Riana Pfefferkorn is the associate director of surveillance and cybersecurity at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society. She’s been at the forefront of what deepfakes will mean to the legal system. “I don’t think this is going to be as big and widespread thing as people fear it’s going to be,” she says. “But at the same time, there’s totally going to be stuff that none of us see coming.”

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