Of Interest

  • Berners-Lee: EU Should Ban Zero Rating

    Date published: 
    July 14, 2016

    "World Wide Web pioneer Sir Tim Berners-Lee has joined with others on an open letter to European regulators and lawmakers warning them they have four days to save the open Internet in Europe, including by banning zero rating plans.

    Berners-Lee was weighing in before the end of the public comment period (July 18) on guidelines on implementing and applying EU net neutrality law, which the European Parliament adopted last fall, pointing to what he and others saw as loopholes that it was crucial to close.

  • With 4 Days Left, Sir Tim Berners-Lee, Larry Lessig, And Barbara Van Schewick Beg Europe To Close Net Neutrality Loopholes

    Date published: 
    July 14, 2016

    "Europe only has a few days left to ensure that its member countries are actually protected by realnet neutrality rules. As we've been discussing, back in October the European Union passed net neutrality rules, but they were so packed with loopholes to not only be useful, but actively harmful in that they effectively legalize net neutrality violations by large telecom operators.

  • Is Tesla’s Fatal Crash a Setback for Self-Driving Technologies?

    Date published: 
    July 14, 2016

    "“Depending on the specific facts and the particular state’s law, Tesla could conceivably be liable to the family of the Tesla driver for the design and marketing of its autopilot system,” said Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina, who specializes in autonomous vehicle regulations.

    “Other vehicle owners might claim misrepresentation,” he said."

  • Microsoft Wins Major Privacy Victory for Data Held Overseas

    Date published: 
    July 14, 2016

    "“Microsoft’s victory over the U.S. government is a resounding affirmation of the endurance of privacy in an age marked by constant data transfers in the cloud, Internet of Things, and big data applications,” Omer Tene, vice president of research and education at the International Association of Privacy Professionals, said in a statement to The Intercept."

  • Property owners: Get off my lawn, Pokemon!

    Date published: 
    July 14, 2016

    "Ryan Calo, a University of Washington law professor, said private property owners may adopt a "Pokemon No Go" policy and bar players from physically entering their building or grounds. But he said there's no legal right to compel the game's creators to remove a location from its lines of code.

    "It's important to note that the Pokemon are not there on the property," he said. "What's happening is that a particular location triggers the display of a digital monster on your phone. The monster is only on your phone.""

  • The Inventor of the Web Wants Europeans To Rescue Net Neutrality

    Date published: 
    July 14, 2016

    "Tim Berners-Lee, the man who invented the World Wide Web, has pleaded with EU regulators to sew up the loopholes in the bloc’s new net neutrality rules, which aim to maintain a level playing field on the Internet.

    Berners-Lee, along with activist academics Lawrence Lessig and Barbara van Schewick, published an open letter to citizens, lawmakers and regulators, declaring there were “four days to save the open Internet in Europe.”

  • Tesla's Autopilot Driving Mode Is A Legal Nightmare

    Date published: 
    July 14, 2016

    "The problem may be that the term autopilot may be just enough to lull drivers into the false sense that the car doesn’t need any user input, and can just simply drive itself. Ryan Calo, assistant professor of law at the University of Washington, said if drivers are deemed to be aware of the risk, it may let Tesla off the hook. “Because we’re talking about physical safety,” Calo said, “courts and regulators will likely hold Tesla to a higher standard.”

  • Police Robots Need to Be Regulated to Avoid Potential Risks

    Author(s): 
    Elizabeth Joh
    Publication Date: 
    July 14, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    The robot used by the Dallas police department to kill Micah Johnson — the sniper who fired into a peaceful protest and killed five police officers, injuring others — was originally designed to defuse explosives. The police attached a pound of the explosive C4 to the robot, creating a makeshift weapon out of a design that was not intended to inflict harm on people. The robot was also remote-controlled, not autonomous.

  • Police Robots Could Reduce the Use of Deadly Force

    Author(s): 
    Yana Welinder
    Publication Date: 
    July 14, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    The use of robots inevitably changes the equation for how police apply "use of force," a term that is broadly defined by the International Association of Chiefs of Police as the "amount of effort required by police to compel compliance by an unwilling subject."

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