Of Interest

  • Modern variations on the 'Trolley Problem' meme

    Date published: 
    June 8, 2016

    "The article then paraphrases philosophy professor Patrick Lin, whose work at Cal Poly focuses in part on the ethics of driverless cars. According to Lin, "On the one hand, [the trolley problem] is a great entry point and teaching tool for engineers with no background in ethics. On the other hand, its prevalence, whimsical tone, and iconic status can shield you from considering a wider range of dilemmas and ethical considerations.""

  • Lexus struggles with software bug: What this means for automakers

    Date published: 
    June 8, 2016

    "Even the stereo, which was affected by Lexus's update, can create an unsafe situation, robotics law expert Ryan Calo told the Monitor. For example, buggy software might cause the radio to blare suddenly, startling the driver and causing an accident.

    Tesla recently introduced a software update to control the whole vehicle, Dr. Calo tells the Monitor, although he says Lexus' update is technically not critical to safety. 

    The result, he says, is that "The line between control-critical and entertainment systems is not perfectly clean.""

  • Why you should think twice before spilling your guts to a chatbot

    Date published: 
    June 8, 2016

    "“Chatbots may be able to get us to say more about ourselves than an ordinary website,” says Ryan Calo, codirector of the Tech Policy Lab at the University of Washington.

    “Consider a chatbot that leverages the social principle of reciprocity,” says Mr. Calo. “If a chatbot, like an online form, just says: ‘Enter your age here,’ you might not. But if amidst a conversation with a chatbot it says, ‘I was created last year. When were you born?’ you well might. At least that's what experimental studies by Cliff Nass and others have shown.”"
  • Online anti-Semitism: Difficult to Fight, but Even Harder to Quantify

    Date published: 
    June 7, 2016

    "Danielle Citron, a professor of law at the University of Maryland and an expert on online harassment, is not sure whether online anti-Semitism is spreading or simply drawing more attention. “What I can say is that it’s become more mainstream,” she notes. “It is no longer hidden in the dark corners of the internet like it once was. We are now seeing it on very mainstream platforms like Facebook and Twitter.”

  • Luiz Fernando Moncau Joins Stanford Center for Internet and Society as Intermediary Liability Fellow

    The Center for Internet and Society (CIS) at Stanford Law School has appointed Luiz Fernando Marrey Moncau as Intermediary Liability Fellow. In this role at CIS, Moncau will continue his longstanding work promoting strong and well-crafted intermediary liability laws that advance the rights and freedoms of Internet users. He will start in July 2016, working with Intermediary Liability Director Daphne Keller

  • EU, U.S. sign data privacy umbrella agreement

    Date published: 
    June 6, 2016

    "Industry professionals warn of the economic consequences that the lack of certainty involving data sharing agreements could create. International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) Vice President of Research and Education Omer Tene said the debate involving these agreements will “cast doubt on the viability of the existing framework and foments an extended period of uncertainty and risk for businesses in the US and EU.”"

  • Why is everyone covering up their laptop cameras?

    Date published: 
    June 6, 2016

    "Yet not everyone is on the camera-covering bandwagon. Brian Pascal, a privacy expert who has worked for Stanford and Palantir Technologies says a cost-benefit analysis led him conclude he’d rather have a usable camera, which he can use to record his son. But he acknowledged such stickers are a way for people signal that they too worry about Big Brother.

    “Security actions without threat modelling are just performative,” said Pascal."

  • Will the Constitution Protect Your Next Smartphone?

    Date published: 
    June 3, 2016

    "But these decisions don’t necessarily mean the debate over the Fifth Amendment and fingerprint readers is all wrapped up, says Al Gidari, a technology lawyer and the director of privacy at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society.

  • The U.S. wants to maintain cross-border data flows. That may be tough.

    Author(s): 
    Henry Farrell
    Publication Date: 
    June 2, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    "Karen Kornbluh, the former U.S. ambassador to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), has a new cyber brief making the case for open cross-border data flows at the Council on Foreign Relations website (full disclosure: I authored an earlier brief in this series). Kornbluh argues that foreign jurisdictions pose an increasing threat to open flows of data across networks such as the Internet.

  • Outing is totally still a thing, people

    Date published: 
    June 3, 2016

    "“The fact is we have made some important progress with regard to the LGBT community; what 50 years ago was a crime is now in some states protected by antidiscrimination law. They have the right to marry, that’s a lot of progress,” said Danielle Citron, a University of Maryland law professor. “But prejudices continue. The suggestion that bigotry and hate is going to somehow disappear because the law has changed is out of touch with reality, and outing someone for being LGBT can still do damage.”"

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