Of Interest

  • Failing the Real Test: SB 822 No Longer Restores All the Lost Net Neutrality Protections

    On June 20, SB 822 had its first committee hearing in the California Assembly. The bill, authored by Senator Scott Wiener, sought to bring back net neutrality to California and restore all of the important protections that the FCC voted to eliminate in December. It was widely viewed as a net neutrality model bill that would set the standard for other states. But instead of passing the bill, the committee adopted amendments that effectively gutted it, removing critical protections at a time when they are more important than ever. 
     
  • Police: Backup driver in fatal Uber crash was distracted

    Date published: 
    June 22, 2018

    "Both Vasquez and Uber could still face civil liability in the case, Uber for potentially negligent hiring, training and supervision, said Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina law professor who closely follows autonomous vehicles.

    Vasquez could be charged criminally, and if there's evidence that Uber or its employees acted recklessly, then charges against them are possible, Smith said. But charges against the company are not likely, he added.

  • Exigent Circumstances: iOS 12’s USB Restricted Mode and Warrantless iPhone Access

    Author(s): 
    Riana Pfefferkorn
    Publication Date: 
    June 22, 2018
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    Apple recently confirmed the introduction of a new feature called “USB Restricted Mode” in the latest version of the iPhone’s mobile operating system, iOS 12. If enabled in the user’s settings, USB Restricted Mode will disable data transfer from the iPhone over the Lightning cable once the phone has been locked for an hour unless the phone’s password is entered.

  • Amazon Needs to Stop Providing Facial Recognition Tech for the Government

    Author(s): 
    Woodrow Hartzog
    Publication Date: 
    June 21, 2018
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    Imagine a technology that is potently, uniquely dangerous — something so inherently toxic that it deserves to be completely rejected, banned, and stigmatized. Something so pernicious that regulation cannot adequately protect citizens from its effects.

    That technology is already here. It is facial recognition technology, and its dangers are so great that it must be rejected entirely.

  • What 7 Creepy Patents Reveal About Facebook

    Date published: 
    June 21, 2018

    "As long as Facebook keeps collecting personal information, we should be wary that it could be used for purposes more insidious than targeted advertising, including swaying elections or manipulating users’ emotions, said Jennifer King, the director of consumer privacy at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School. “There could be real consequences,” she said."

  • How Twitter Made The Tech World's Most Unlikely Comeback

    Date published: 
    June 21, 2018

    "“They are incredibly serious about addressing abuse and harassment, threats, and nonconsensual pornography,” University of Maryland law professor Danielle Citron told BuzzFeed News. Citron, who sits on Twitter’s Trust and Safety Council and has no financial relationship with the company, said things are getting better on Twitter, at least from her vantage point. “Because I write about cyberstalking and harassment and threats, I get countless emails. But there are less about Twitter,” she said."

  • Massachusetts Welcomes Self-Driving Cars—With a Couple Caveats

    Date published: 
    June 21, 2018

    "“I'm really pleased to see the coordination with and among cities,” says Bryant Walker Smith, who studies autonomous vehicle legislation at the University of South Carolina School of Law. “One of the keys to getting the most out of automated driving will be to empower communities.”"

  • How Facebook Programmed Our Relatives

    Author(s): 
    Brett Frischmann
    Publication Date: 
    June 21, 2018
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    Three years ago, on his birthday, a law professor watched his e-mail inbox fill with Facebook notifications indicating that friends had posted messages on his wall. The messages made him sad. The clogged inbox was annoying, but what really upset him was having disclosed his birth date to Facebook in the first place. It’s not necessary for social networking or to comply with privacy laws, as some people mistakenly believe. He hadn't paid much attention when he signed up—as with most electronic contracts, there was no room for negotiation or deliberation about terms.

Pages

Subscribe to Of Interest