Of Interest

  • Self-driving Ubers arrive in San Francisco

    Date published: 
    December 14, 2016

    "The law can be read that way, but doing so might cause tension between Uber and state regulators, according to Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and scholar with Stanford Law School who specializes in autonomous driving. He acknowledged that risk is unlikely to deter the company that built its entire ride-hailing business model by operating in a similar legal gray area.

  • State regulators demand Uber halt self-driving car program, threaten legal action

    Date published: 
    December 14, 2016

    "Uber’s argument takes the DMV’s rules literally, but goes against the spirit of the regulations, said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and scholar with Stanford Law School who specializes in autonomous driving.

    “You can make this argument, but it’s not one that’s going to make you friends,” he said."

  • Uber’s Robo-Car Test in SF Is a Middle Finger to Regulators

    Date published: 
    December 15, 2016

    "Uber’s got a good argument when it comes to the text of the law, if not the spirit. “Clearly California and Nevada [which has similar rules] wanted to build a regime of trust,” says Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law who studies self-driving vehicles. Those states wanted to encourage companies to test, keep the public in the know, and share information that helps everyone move forward."

  • DMV to Uber: Yank your self-driving cars — or else

    Date published: 
    December 14, 2016

    "“Roll back a few years, and public service commissions, taxicab (regulators), police and airport authorities were saying to Uber: ‘Stop doing what you’re doing; it’s unlawful,’” said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina and expert on self-driving cars. “Sometimes it complied but often it did not.” Ultimately many jurisdictions ended up legalizing ride-hailing services.

  • FCC taking hard look at ‘free’ data for video services

    Date published: 
    December 14, 2016

    "Earlier this year, Stanford Law Professor Barbara van Schewick wrote a report examining T-Mobile’s Binge On zero-rated program, which offers “unlimited” streaming of content from certain providers, like Netflix, Hulu and HBO.

    In the report, van Schewick concluded that despite T-Mobile’s assurances that Binge On is open to any legal streaming provider at no cost, significant technical barriers to entry still work to discriminate against smaller streaming services.

  • 2016 Cato Surveillance Conference (Past Event)

    December 14, 2016
    Washington, DC

    Eight years ago, Barack Obama arrived in Washington pledging to reverse the dramatic expansion of state surveillance his predecessor had presided over in the name of fighting terrorism. Instead, the Obama administration saw the Bush era’s “collect it all” approach to surveillance become still more firmly entrenched. Meanwhile, the advanced spying technologies once limited to intelligence agencies have been gradually trickling down to local police departments.

  • Data Confidential

    It’s nearly impossible to know if you're having a truly private, unmonitored conversation today. Big data and online communications open the door for widespread surveillance. But even if you feel like you personally have nothing to hide, surveillance is about much more than individual privacy – it’s about the necessary conditions of a free and just society, and protecting a space to criticize the status quo and the powers that be.

  • Google just published eight National Security Letters

    Date published: 
    December 13, 2016

    "“In our continued effort to increase transparency around government demands for user data, today we begin to make available to the public the National Security Letters (NSLs) we have received where, either through litigation or legislation, we have been freed of nondisclosure obligations,” Richard Salgado, Google’s director of law enforcement and information security, wrote in a blog post."

  • Google reveals 8 secret letters from FBI

    Date published: 
    December 13, 2016

    "“We minimized redactions to protect privacy interests, but the content of the NSLs remain as they were when served. We are also publishing the correspondence reflecting the lifting of the nondisclosure restrictions,” Richard Salgado, Google’s director for law enforcement and information security, wrote on the company’s blog."

  • Thomas Schelling has died. His ideas shaped the Cold War and the world.

    Author(s): 
    Henry Farrell
    Publication Date: 
    December 13, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    The University of Maryland has confirmed the death of Thomas Schelling, perhaps the most important economist and social scientist of his generation. Most social scientists hope that their ideas will be read, and perhaps, if they are lucky, change people’s minds a little. Schelling’s ideas made the Cold War what it was and changed the world.

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