Of Interest

  • It's Too Complicated: How the Internet Upends Katz, Smith, and Electronic Surveillance Law

    Author(s): 
    Stephanie Pell
    Publication Date: 
    February 6, 2017
    Publication Type: 
    Academic Writing

    For more than forty years, electronic surveillance law in the United States has drawn a strong distinction between the protections afforded to communications "content"and those afforded to the "noncontent"—also known as "metadata"—associated with it. The legal framework for surveillance law was developed largely in the context of the mid-twentieth century telephone system, which itself treated content and metadata as cleanly distinct technical concepts.

  • Tech Giants Have the Legal Clout to Help Stop Trump’s Refugee Ban

    Date published: 
    February 6, 2017

    "“The tech industry has been increasingly active in recent years in cases that involve the civil rights of their customers or, like in this case, their employees,” says Neil Richards, a professor at Washington University School of Law in St. Louis. “Courts do take the views of industry seriously in these cases, particularly when those views seem broader than merely guarding the bottom line.”"

  • Uber hires NASA veteran to work on flying autonomous cars

    Date published: 
    February 6, 2017

    ""These tech companies are determined to make self-driving cars seem boring by comparison!" said Bryant Walker Smith, associate professor at the University of South Carolina and an expert in the legal implications of autonomous driving. "We're at the beginning of this technological curve, where companies are competing for public attention before they've figured out their role in this potential market.""

  • Area law enforcement moving to deploy body cameras

    Date published: 
    February 4, 2017

    "Harlan Yu, a principal at Upturn, pointed out that the police chief has the authority to bar an officer from viewing a recording, particularly if it includes a “significant traumatic event.” Yet he added that “you can imagine a situation where the chief of police always eventually gives an officer involved in a shooting the leeway to watch the footage.”"

  • Facebook, Google, Apple Lead U.S. Business Charge Against Trump Travel Ban

    Date published: 
    February 3, 2017

    "The upcoming letter will be another show of unity for the industry, said Andrew Bridges, a lawyer at Fenwick & West who is not involved in the drafting of the letter but has worked with many of the same companies on unrelated matters. "My fear is that the ban, both literally and secondarily as a reflection of broader policies, is going to threaten the American economy in the most fundamental way," Bridges said, adding that given Trump's recent proposals, "Why would any global company want to have its headquarters in the U.S.?""

  • Tech Could Do More to Oppose Trump—at a Price

    Date published: 
    February 3, 2017

    "But standing up to a president also carries risks, especially for publicly traded companies, which face a legal obligation to put profit ahead of protest. “For companies that are acting in their self-interest, the process is sitting down and looking at this matrix, and trying to figure out how to be effective,” says Andrew McLaughlin, a venture partner at Betaworks and deputy chief technology officer of the United States under President Obama."

  • These 23 Principles Could Help Us Avoid an AI Apocalypse

    Date published: 
    February 2, 2017

    "Patrick Lin, a conference attendee and the the director of the Ethics + Emerging Sciences Group at California Polytechnic State University, says the Asilomar AI principles sprung from “a perfect storm of influences” he hadn’t encountered before. “This was a standard-setting exercise in a field that has no cohesive identity, making the exercise much more difficult,” he told Gizmodo."

  • Ukraine v. Russia: Before the International Court of Justice

    Author(s): 
    Beth Van Schaack
    Publication Date: 
    February 2, 2017
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    With all the news around President Donald Trump taking office, and the mass protests, controversial executive orders, and pending lawsuits that followed, it may have escaped notice that Ukraine filed suit against the Russian Federation before the International Court of Justice (ICJ) on January 16 (the official Application is here).  Ukraine has accused Russia of “intervening militarily in Ukraine, financing acts of terrorism, and violating the human rights of milli

  • Alert: Sunrise Coming in May for New Privacy Law, Enforcer in Japan

    Date published: 
    February 2, 2017

    "Woodrow Hartzog, Starnes Professor of Law at the Cumberland School of Law at Samford University, told Bloomberg BNA that the amended act “makes some very important changes, but like with most new pieces of privacy legislation, many important terms will need to be more fully defined and interpreted.”

    Hartzog said that “under the old law, the privacy rules were largely conceived of as obligations on businesses.” Companies will probably see a rise in individuals requesting access to personal data and seeking to delete or correct that information, he said."

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