Of Interest

  • Law enforcement hacking declared search under Fourth Amendment

    Date published: 
    September 15, 2016

    "Riana Pfefferkorn, cryptography fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, said the issue could be resolved by Congress first with the decision on "a pending change to Rule 41 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, which governs the issuance of search and seizure warrants by federal judges."

  • Pentagon says killer robots have no place in US military

    Date published: 
    September 15, 2016

    ""What you still want is humans to designate the target in advance and ensure they are legal and lawful targets before the system is deployed," said Peter Asaro, a philosopher who studies artificial intelligence and is co-founder of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control."

  • Correcting the Record on Section 702: A Prerequisite for Meaningful Surveillance Reform

    Author(s): 
    Jennifer Granick
    Publication Date: 
    September 15, 2016
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    The legal authority behind the controversial PRISM and Upstream surveillance programs used by the NSA to collect large swaths of private communications from leading Internet companies –  Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) –  is scheduled to expire on December 31, 2017. In recent months, Congress began to review these programs to assess whether to renew, reform, or retire section 702. Unfortunately, it appears the debate has already been skewed by misconceptions about the true scope of surveillance conducted under the contentious provision.

  • Policy, Law, and Technology in the Current Crypto Wars

    November 2, 2016
    Paul Brest Hall - Stanford University

    To celebrate the one-year anniversary of the Stanford Cryptography Policy Project, we are holding an afternoon event highlighting our research and accomplishments over the past year. As our keynote speakers, it is our pleasure to welcome the Honorable Stephen W. Smith, Magistrate Judge of the Southern District of Texas, and Paul S. Grewal, former Magistrate Judge of the Northern District of California.

  • Privacy, the forgotten issue: Apathy is making Americans vulnerable

    Date published: 
    September 14, 2016

    "“If people know things about you, they can take advantage of you,” Ryan Calo, an assistant professor of law and a technology expert at the University of Washington, told Salon. Corporations have “the capacity and incentive to manipulate consumers to their benefit based on what they know about them” and “the same is true of government.”

  • Uber’s robot taxis hit the road in Pittsburgh

    Date published: 
    September 14, 2016

    "“The public will play an important role in shaping both social and legal expectations for these vehicles,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who is affiliated with Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society. “That’s why companies like Uber should publicly share their safety philosophies — how they define, measure, document, and monitor the reasonable safety of their vehicles now and into the future.”"

  • Google seeks changes in Michigan self-driving car bill

    Date published: 
    September 14, 2016

    ""Who did Michigan want to include in this great project of automated driving? The careful language in that letter could give an advantage to traditional manufacturers," said Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina professor who has studied the legal and regulatory issues surrounding self-driving cars."

  • Why scientists must share their research code

    Date published: 
    September 13, 2016

    "Many scientists worry over the reproducibility of wet-lab experiments, but data scientist Victoria Stodden's focus is on how to validate computational research: analyses that can involve thousands of lines of code and complex data sets.

  • How Cops Have Turned Baltimore into a Surveillance State

    Date published: 
    September 13, 2016

    "Elizabeth Joh, a law professor at the University of California Davis who specializes in policing and technology, told me that while police secrecy is nothing new, the kind of dragnet surveillance that Baltimore has engaged in—where officers aren't necessarily looking for one particular person, or conducting a specific investigation—raises serious political issues. "You need to balance some legitimate police needs with the idea that police may just have too much information on innocent people," Joh said. "And that's a real struggle for people in a democracy to figure out.

  • Google wants to amend Michigan autonomous vehicle bills

    Date published: 
    September 13, 2016

    ""Who did Michigan want to include in this great project of automated driving? The careful language in that letter could give an advantage to traditional manufacturers," said Bryant Walker Smith, a University of South Carolina professor who has studied the legal and regulatory issues surrounding self-driving cars."

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