Of Interest

  • CRYPTO 2018: “Middle Ground” Proposals for a Going-Dark Fix

    On August 19, the CRYPTO 2018 conference on cryptographic research hosted a one-day workshop in Santa Barbara called “Encryption and Surveillance.” The goal of the workshop was to “examine how encryption and related technologies pose both challenges and opportunities for surveillance and reform of surveillance.” I was fortunate to be able to attend this workshop, listen to the panelists’ presentations, and observe the intelligent discussion between speakers and attendees about the topics at hand.

  • The Cybersecurity 202: This new FBI cyber official could be a moderating voice in encryption debate

    Date published: 
    August 15, 2018

    "She wouldn't outright say, ‘Yes, I want a backdoor,’ yet she voiced support for the idea of providers keeping the keys to decrypt data,” Riana Pfefferkorn, cryptography fellow at Stanford Center for Internet and Society, told me. “None of that really suggests to me that she's going to be better on ‘going dark’ or on surveillance and government access more generally.”"

  • Can We Count on Facebook and Google to Police the ‘Modern-Day Town Square’?

    Date published: 
    August 14, 2018

    "These companies “fulfill a roll that approximates a public square,” Geoffrey King, professor of media studies at UC Berkeley, told TheWrap. “It’s a really big deal to censor content or kick someone off your platform. It’s a decision they have the power to make, but it’s not one they should be undertaking lightly, to say the least.”"

  • This Company Keeps Lies About Sandy Hook on the Web

    Date published: 
    August 13, 2018

    "For years, Automattic’s strident response to copyright abuse earned praise from digital rights advocates. Now, this approach has effectively lumped in Mr. Pozner with the abusers. “Strictly from a copyright perspective, WordPress.com’s response is outside the norm,” said Tom Rubin, a lecturer at Stanford Law School who oversaw Microsoft’s copyright group and takedown process for 15 years.

  • Google tracks your movements, like it or not

    Date published: 
    August 13, 2018

    "Storing location data in violation of a user's preferences is wrong, said Jonathan Mayer, a Princeton computer scientist and former chief technologist for the Federal Communications Commission's enforcement bureau. A researcher from Mayer's lab confirmed the AP's findings on multiple Android devices; the AP conducted its own tests on several iPhones that found the same behavior.

  • Is Apple Really Your Privacy Hero?

    Date published: 
    August 9, 2018

    "If Apple wants to truly be an advocate for consumer privacy, it could take the lead in building a better system—one that lets its customers more directly control who has their data. Companies don’t go out of their way to give users deeper control over their contact lists because it’s not beneficial to the bottom line, says Jennifer King, director of consumer privacy at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society. “Nobody has really reimagined the address book since we made them electronic in the ’90s,” she says.

  • The Man Who Sued His Trolls

    Date published: 
    August 9, 2018

    "Part of the problem is the way the laws are written. The federal government and most states have enacted anti-cyberstalking statutes that bar repeated use of electronic communications to frighten others. But during an online hate storm, individual members of the mob might send only one or two threatening messages each—not enough to constitute a pattern, as the laws require, says Danielle Citron, a University of Maryland law professor and the author of Hate Crimes in Cyberspace.

Pages

Subscribe to Of Interest