Of Interest

  • Will Election Hacking Split NATO?

    Author(s): 
    Kristen E. Eichensehr
    Publication Date: 
    March 13, 2017
    Publication Type: 
    Other Writing

    NATO’s Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe, General Sir Adrian Bradshaw, has reportedly suggested that NATO may consider Russian interference in upcoming European elections as an attack triggering collective defense measures. Such a move could put NATO and its member states at odds with the United States, which carefully avoided calling Russian interference in the U.S.

  • California’s Finally Ready for Truly Driverless Cars

    Date published: 
    March 11, 2017

    "One thing missing from the regs: any driving test to pass before letting the robot fly solo. Instead, companies will “self-certify” their vehicles. “That’s like me going to the DMV and saying, believe me, I’m an excellent driver,” says Ryan Calo, who studies robotics law at the University of Washington School of Law. “It makes me a little nervous, honestly.” He would rather see a common requirement, or at least have a third party check the cars out before they hit the public streets."

  • California Gives the Green Light to Self-Driving Cars

    Date published: 
    March 10, 2017

    "California is not the first jurisdiction to pass rules governing the deployment of fully automated vehicles. Michigan has a law contemplating driverless fleets, and Florida has a law that its drafter says covers this, too. “But this would make California the most consciously permissive jurisdiction in the world,” says Ryan Calo, a professor at the University of Washington who teaches a course on robot law. “I question the wisdom of self-certification, especially with players that are not as sophisticated. I think it would be wiser to have third parties audit the technology.”"

  • Assange: WikiLeaks will help tech firms defend against CIA hacking

    Date published: 
    March 10, 2017

    "Although it would be “unheard of” for the federal government to prosecute a company for using leaked classified information to improve its products, there “are some issues with the fact that the information is classified,” said Jennifer Granick, director of civil liberties at Stanford Law School’s Center for internet and Society.

    Given uncertainty about the views of the Justice Department, “I can see why legal counsel at big companies might hesitate to reach out to Julian Assange to negotiate access to classified information,” she said."

  • Gay Iranian refugee in U.S. worries about friends left behind

    Date published: 
    March 9, 2017

    "“The administration has the right to cap and put limits on the number of refugees it’s going to accept — there’s no legal obligation to take a particular number,” said Beth Van Schaack, a professor at Stanford Law School who once investigated war crimes in Syria for the State Department. “The issue is one of morality at some level.”"

  • WikiLeaks Will Help Tech Companies Fix Security Flaws, Assange Says

    Date published: 
    March 9, 2017

    "While WikiLeaks has often been criticized for releasing sensitive data without regard for the consequences, Mr. Assange is acting responsibly this time, said Jennifer Granick, the director of civil liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. WikiLeaks redacted the actual computer code for C.I.A. exploits from its initial release to avoid spreading such cyberweapons.

    “He is trying to do the right thing,” Ms. Granick said."

  • Tech workers electing to use skills in politics

    Date published: 
    March 9, 2017

    "Around the country — and especially in the Bay Area, where 75 percent of voters backed Democrat Hillary Clinton — joining the political fray has become a way to try to reconcile the election’s result, said Sonia Katyal, a co-director of Berkeley Center for Law & Technology.

    “There is a much greater number of individuals who probably would have just entered the tech sector, who are now thinking of themselves as political leaders — purely to stem the tide of what’s happening in Washington,” Katyal said."

  • The Latest Victim of Uber's Disruption May Be Itself

    Date published: 
    March 9, 2017

    "In Rosenblat and Calo’s view, government agencies like the Federal Trade Commission need to more actively step up and investigate possible abuses by peer-to-peer platform operators. Earlier this year, Uber agreed to pay $20 million to the agency, which charged that the company’s advertising had misled recruits about how much income they could expect to earn as drivers. Still, they would prefer to see the FTC dig deeper, prying into their digital back-ends rather than relying on publicly posted documentation.

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