Press

CIS in the news.

  • Facebook Dating Looks a Whole Lot Like Hinge

    Date published: 
    May 3, 2018

    "Daniel Nazer, a staff attorney on the Electronic Frontier Foundation's intellectual property team, thinks Tinder's case faces many of the same pitfalls. "I think most utility patents in this space face the same problems," he says. (Utility patents protect new machines, processes, and other inventions).

  • Judge to Consider This Week Whether to Unseal Vast Surveillance Records

    Date published: 
    May 2, 2018

    "The Apple-FBI fight over encryption was a rare event. Most of the time, the public never has a clue when authorities come knocking and ask a company for “technical assistance” to help get access to digital communications. That makes the true scale of U.S. government surveillance hard to assess—even if we can glean that it’s pervasive nowadays. And probably equally as important, it doesn’t really allow the public to tell just how difficult it is for prosecutors to convince a judge that communications should be turned over.

  • Terrorists still have rail in their target sights

    Date published: 
    May 2, 2018

    "“While al Qaeda and ISIS and their compatriots have staged high profile attacks and plots targeting aviation in the U.S, their high profile  attacks targeting rail tended to be either a long time ago (like Madrid and London), in concert with other targets (like Brussels) or in places people in the US pay less attention to (like Mumbai). This is unfortunate, because plots targeting rail infrastructure in the U.S.

  • SEC sounds cyber 'wake-up call' to public companies

    Date published: 
    May 1, 2018

    "Riana Pfefferkorn, cryptography fellow at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, said the enforcement action could "light a fire" under other public companies to disclose their own cybersecurity incidents, though the case may not help determine where to set the bar for reporting.

  • How the Supreme Court Could Rewrite the Rules for DNA Searches

    Date published: 
    April 30, 2018

    "Like fingerprints in an earlier age, finding a DNA match is now considered the gold standard for criminal prosecutions in America. But the Golden State Killer case puts new attention on how samples are used and obtained in addition to what they tell us. “This isn’t really a DNA story,” Elizabeth Joh, a UC Davis law professor who studies the Fourth Amendment and technology, told me. “It’s a story about data.”

  • Driverless cars are growing in number, but makers don't want to reveal how they sometimes fail

    Date published: 
    April 30, 2018

    "The lack of transparency about the workings of sensors, logic processors, mapping systems and other driverless technology, like the debate over robot-car regulation, could shape public perception of the nascent industry, said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina.

    "Essentially, [the public will be] looking to see whether these companies are trustworthy," he said"

     

  • How the internet tricks you out of privacy using 'dark patterns' of design

    Date published: 
    April 30, 2018

    "Deceptive design nudges, tricks and goads you into sharing more than you might intend to online, Professor Hartzog argues in his new book, Privacy's Blueprint: The Battle to Control the Design of New Technologies.

    And when you think you're in control of your own data, you rarely are.

    "If you want to know when social media companies are trying to manipulate you into disclosing information or engaging more, the answer is always," he said."

  • Cops take dead man’s smartphone to his corpse in attempt to unlock it

    Date published: 
    April 29, 2018

    "Another attorney, Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography fellow at Stanford Law School, underscored the fact that not only was going to a dead person’s fingerprints unsettling, but that it was questionable from a practical perspective.

    "This gives cops a perverse incentive to delete any evidence and films or text messages," she told Ars. "What's to stop them from doing that if they learn that this is a viable technique and if the person is dead?""

  • Should Police Body Cameras Get Facial Recognition Tech?

    Date published: 
    April 26, 2018

    "But what happens if the technology makes a mistake? "It's a recipe for tragedy," said Harlan Yu, executive director for Upturn, a technology and social justice non-profit. He's worried that the same technology could misidentify innocent civilians as suspects and perpetuate police brutality.

    "Body-worn cameras are supposed to be tools for transparency and accountability," he said. "But facial recognition could eventually turn these body cameras into tools for mass surveillance.""

  • Meet Badass, the Grassroots Activists Hitting Revenge Porn Where It Lives

    Date published: 
    April 26, 2018

    ""Culturally, we’ve taken a huge hit," Danielle Citron, who teaches law at the University of Maryland, told WIRED last March. “Getting people to take this seriously can feel like banging your head against the wall. We’ve been here before with domestic violence and sexual harassment in the workplace. It's so depressing.”"

  • Users must demand more privacy protection, Mozilla director tells MPs

    Date published: 
    April 26, 2018

    "A director with Mozilla Corp., the company that makes the Firefox browser, says he welcomes more regulation of the internet but is also urging citizens to push for more privacy protection from the websites they visit.

    Marshall Erwin, Mozilla’s director of trust and security, told MPs Thursday that public pressure could encourage companies like Facebook to improve their approach to privacy protection.

  • Axon's police body cams could be getting an AI upgrade. Civil rights groups are worried.

    Date published: 
    April 26, 2018

    "Harlan Yu, executive director of Upturn, which monitors police agencies' body camera policies and is one of the letter's signatories, said the groups felt it important to "draw a bright ethical line" around real-time facial recognition body cameras. He also said the groups were troubled by the lack of representation on the ethics board of communities, particularly those made up of racial minorities, that are subject to intense police scrutiny.

    "Just because real-time face recognition might be technologically feasible to do doesn’t mean they should," Yu said."

  • American politics and the changing media landscape

    Date published: 
    April 25, 2018

    ""These platforms that have really brilliantly democratized the ability to publish for everybody also have brought this sort of architecture that can be gamed for nonsense at a much bigger scale than ever has been seen," said Nabiha Syed, associate general counsel for BuzzFeed."

  • Net neutrality death delayed

    Date published: 
    April 25, 2018

    ""Portugal features the worst net neutrality violations we have seen in Europe to this day. It is hard to imagine how an independent regulator cannot find those offers in violation of EU law," said Thomas Lohninger, executive director of epicenter.works, a member organisation of European Digital Rights (EDRi). "In this complaint, we present legal and economic evidence that, by all criteria of the EU net neutrality rules, these products should be prohibited.""

  • What Happens When a Self-driving Car Is at Fault?

    Date published: 
    April 25, 2018

    "Not to mention its track record. “It’s not just being able to show what happened but being able to show that the data should be believed,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who studies driverless car regulations. “And then having the resources on all sides—that’s government investigators, plaintiffs, even defendant companies—to be able to analyze that data, understand it, and model it.”"

  • Amazon will now deliver to your car — but you might pay for it in privacy

    Date published: 
    April 24, 2018

    "“If you trust Amazon with your data, as many people do, then delivery to the trunk of your car is a safe way to getting your package, and perhaps safer than in-home delivery,” said Albert Gidari, director of privacy at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School. “This is another example of trading off privacy and security for convenience.”"

  • Facebook finally explains why it bans some content, in 27 pages

    Date published: 
    April 24, 2018

    "Malkia Cyril, a Black Lives Matter activist in Oakland, Calif., who is also the executive director for the Center for Media Justice, was among a coalition of more than 70 civil rights groups that pressured Facebook in 2017 to fix its “racially-biased” content moderation system. Among the changes the coalition sought was an appeals process for posts that are taken down.

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