Press

CIS in the news.

  • Feds vow to clear road for self-driving car makers

    Date published: 
    September 12, 2017

    "“This new policy adjusts the tone but continues much of the substance of last year's document,” said Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina. “It clearly reflects the input of the traditional automotive industry but doesn’t exclude potential new entrants such as Waymo.”"

  • Prof Shows How Your Internet Activity Is Being Watched

    Date published: 
    September 11, 2017

    "According to Narayanan, even without trackers, it is safe to conclude that anonymity does not exist on the internet. Narayanan’s group previously demonstrated that almost all browsing history can be de-anonymized and traced to specific users. According to Narayanan, Edward Snowden’s leaks on the U.S. government’s surveillance programs revealed that cookies — small pieces of information stored by a website on a user’s computer — can be used to tie that history back to specific people."

  • Robots need civil rights, too

    Date published: 
    September 8, 2017

    "Her fictional scenario fits right into issues tackled by the burgeoning field of robot law, according to University of Washington law professor Ryan Calo. “There’s a physical, biological set of understandings that permeate the Constitution,” he said. For example, we give every person a vote, and we give every person the right to reproduce. But what if an AI can reproduce 10 million versions of itself every second? Do we give all of them a vote? And what if a robot wants to run for president? Does it have to wait 35 years, even if it is born with adult-level consciousness?

  • Lyft to unleash self-driving cars on Bay Area roads

    Date published: 
    September 7, 2017

    "These pilot programs bring Lyft one step closer to reaching its ultimate goal of a driverless future. In 2016, Lyft President John Zimmer predicted that autonomous vehicles will account for the majority of Lyft rides within five years. And getting real people to test the technology plays a major role in facilitating its wide-spread deployment, said Bryant Walker Smith, a Stanford Law School researcher and self-driving car expert.

  • Before trying robot judges, let's learn from robot referees

    Date published: 
    September 7, 2017

    "At the outset, the goal of this research was to use sports as a way to answer questions about law enforcement. The criminal justice system is much more complicated than an athletic institution, the problems are weightier, and the consequences more dire. But even though it’s not a not a perfect parallel, Ryan Calo, who studies law and technology at the University of Washington, says that the research helps explain how people respond when machines lay down the law.

  • The evolving laws and rules around privacy, data security, and robots

    Date published: 
    September 6, 2017

    "Every day we use countless digital devices and web services to shop, track our fitness, chat with friends, play games, check-in at stores and restaurants, you name it. While these activities are becoming increasingly essential in our digital society, they also can put our personal information at risk, says professor Woodrow Hartzog, whose research focuses on privacy, data protection, robotics, and automated technologies.

  • House passes self-driving car rules to map out vehicles’ future

    Date published: 
    September 5, 2017

    "The proposed act represents a “surprisingly bipartisan approach” to regulation, said Stanford University researcher Bryant Walker Smith.

    “This is a reasonable and flexible approach that gives NHTSA more authority, gives serious developers more flexibility, makes it a legal priority for NHTSA to more closely regulate these systems and then doesn’t remove other potential regulatory tools,” he said."

  • Reality Winner Was Not Told She Had the Right to Remain Silent

    Date published: 
    September 1, 2017

    "University of California, Davis law professor Elizabeth Joh came to a similar conclusion about Winner’s case. “She certainly could have a valid argument,” Joh told me on Tuesday. “While she wasn’t arrested at the time of her questioning, Miranda requirements kick in any time there is a situation of custodial interrogation. That includes formal arrest, but can also include situations that amount to a coercive atmosphere that looks and feels like the equivalent of an arrest.”"

  • The Comment Period Is Over, But the Battle for Net Neutrality Ain't Done Yet

    Date published: 
    August 31, 2017

    "Open internet advocates argue that net neutrality is especially important for marginalized populations that feel threatened by the Trump administration. "Communities of color across the United States depend on an open internet to thrive," Malkia Cyril, executive director at the Center for Media Justice, said in an email to Motherboard. "From resisting police violence to demanding fair wages—the political voice and economic opportunity that the internet enables must remain protected by Title II net neutrality."

  • AI’s rapid advance sparks call for a code for robots

    Date published: 
    August 31, 2017

    "Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington, says that we tend to talk about robots as if they are a future technology, ignoring the fact that we have already been living with them for several decades. “If you want to envisage the future in the 1920s, 1940s, 1980s, or in 2017, then you think of robots. But the reality is that robots have been in our societies since the 1950s,” he says."

  • Do We Need a Speedometer for Artificial Intelligence?

    Date published: 
    August 30, 2017

    "It’s less clear how such measures might help government officials and regulators grappling with the effects of smarter software in areas like privacy. “I’m not sure how useful it’ll be,” says Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington who recently proposed a detailed roadmap of AI policy issues. He argues that decisionmakers need a high-level grasp of the underlying technology, and a strong sense of values, more than granular measures of progress."

  • Court: Locating suspect via stingray definitely requires a warrant

    Date published: 
    August 26, 2017

    "Riana Pfefferkorn, a lawyer affiliated with the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, said that the judge’s ruling was "careful," but she noted that it may not specifically matter, given that both state and federal policy has changed since Ellis and his co-defendants were arrested in 2013.

    "This is resolving something that happened over four years ago where on a going forward basis it may be a moot point," she told Ars."

  • This Big Beef Exposes The Ugly Underbelly of Vegan Vlogging

    Date published: 
    August 23, 2017

    "“Many people suing for harassment have tried to find exemptions under the CDA,” said Daphne Keller, director of intermediary liability at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society, making the point that the platforms usually win."

  • Can we have a hack-proof democracy?

    Date published: 
    August 23, 2017

    In January 2017 the US finally designated voting machines as a critical infrastructure. Why do you think it’s appropriate? What’s got you worried?

    It's appropriate because picking the next leader of the free world unfettered from foreign interference should be at least as important to us as turning the lights on or using our smartphones.

    Looking ahead to the 2018 and 2020 US elections, I’m worried about the ability of technology to now produce very accurate fake audio and video files.

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