Press

CIS in the news.

  • Experts present most pressing issues facing global lawmakers on citizens’ privacy, democracy and rights to freedom of speech

    Date published: 
    May 31, 2019

    "“Make commitments to public service journalism”, Ben Scott, The Center for Internet and Society, Stanford Law School

    Ben states that technology doesn’t cause the problem of data misinformation, and irregulation. It infact accelerates it. This calls for policies to be made to limit the exploitation of these technology tools by malignant actors and by companies that place profits over the public interest. He says, “we have to view our technology problem through the lens of the social problems that we’re experiencing.”"

  • The Week in Tech: Disinformation’s Huge Inaction Problem

    Date published: 
    May 31, 2019

    "“What’s not so clear yet is whether G.D.P.R. has had an effect on privacy and on corporate data practices,” said Omer Tene, vice president and chief knowledge officer at the International Association of Privacy Professionals. “Has the underlying business model of the internet changed? Is consumer privacy better? I think those questions are very much still open.”"

  • Reddit Co-founder, Congresswoman advocate for net neutrality at Law School event

    Date published: 
    May 31, 2019

    "Van Schewick argued that the motivation for removing net neutrality rules came largely from ISPs looking to capitalize on their positions as gatekeepers. She said that in 2013, prior to net neutrality regulations being put in place, six large ISPs started using “choke points” to slow down certain games and and videos, only speeding them up if the hosting websites were willing to pay.

    “The ISPs have more money, and they definitely have more lobbyists,” Schewick said. “But that does not mean they get to win. They only win if we are silent.”"

  • Facebook is still letting border militias organize on its platform

    Date published: 
    May 30, 2019

    "Jennifer Granick, a surveillance and cybersecurity counsel with the ACLU, explains that the purpose of the law “isn’t necessarily to protect the tech companies, but to protect the American people in having a platform where you can post information and post our stories, because if the platforms were liable for information that their users publish, then they wouldn’t be able to publish that information. They would have to go through some kind of advanced review process.”"

  • Van Hollen And UMBC Expert Talk About Next Steps After Cyber Attack On Baltimore City

    Date published: 
    May 29, 2019

    ""Once a tool like this is out there, it's only a matter of time before criminals will take advantage of it and use it against governments or other targets like we're seeing now," Richard Forno, the assistant director of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County Center For Cybersecurity, told Nehman. "I'm wondering if there was a breakdown in the IT processes that led to this ransomware attack.""

  • Artificial intelligence is at the heart of online toxicity, Grand Committee hears

    Date published: 
    May 29, 2019

    "Ben Scott, a Stanford fellow at the Centre for Internet and Society and a former advisor to Hillary Clinton, said that it wasn’t until the tech giants got hooked on machine learning that concerns about their polarizing effect and impact on democracy really took off.

    “It’s not just the ads that get targeted. Everything gets targeted. The entire communications environment in which we live is now tailored by machine intelligence to hold our attention,” he said.

  • Facebook, Google and Twitter in data regulators' sights

    Date published: 
    May 28, 2019

    ""In the first year, we've seen tens of thousands of complaints and data breaches," says Omer Tene, the IAPP's vice president and chief knowledge officer.

    "But we've yet to see much evidence that the GDPR has led to an improvement in organisations' data practices.""

  • How the EU’s Far Right Will Boost Google, Facebook, and Amazon

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2019

    "Thomas Lohninger, executive director of Epicenter Works, another NGO that ran an ostensibly grassroots campaign against the Copyright Directive, says his group worked with politicians from across the spectrum. “You can find allies in all political parties, and if you are working toward the majority, you also have to talk with all of the people and explore all avenues that you can in order to gain a majority. And that's what we did,” Lohninger says. “There are of course the Euroskeptics, that are fundamentally opposed to every type of European legislation or regulation.

  • Cash-back shopping savings, but at what price?

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2019

    "Cashback services collect a lot of data. This would be fine if it stayed within the company, says Jen King, director of consumer privacy at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, but she suspects that isn’t the case.

  • It’s Been One Year Since GDPR Scared the Crap Out of Silicon Valley, What’s Next?

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2019

    "“If you want to be more skeptical, the question is does all this activity actually deliver more privacy?” said Omer Tene, Vice President at the International Association of Privacy Professionals, an industry trade body. “Ostensibly the goal isn’t just to mobilize compliance and regulatory efforts, complaints, and notifications but to actually result in better privacy for individuals on the ground. I think the jury is still out on that. It’s not clear at year end that corporate data practices are different or have changed.”"

  • Serial cyberstalker could avoid prison again under plea deal

    Date published: 
    May 22, 2019

    "University of Maryland law professor Danielle Citron, author of the book “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace,” said state criminal statutes outlawing such behavior typically are misdemeanors with light punishments that don’t deter offenders. The criminal justice system tends to view online abuse as “no big deal,” she said, and perpetrators get empathy while “we forget and erase the victims.”"

  • Jourova urges member states to respect ‘the spirit of the GDPR’

    Date published: 
    May 22, 2019

    "However, Omer Tene, vice president and chief knowledge officer of the IAPP, struck a sober tone in response to the figures, saying that while the numbers look convincing, there is much to be done in terms of updating the practical culture of data protection in EU business.

    “In the first year, we’ve seen tens of thousands of complaints and data breaches, but we’ve yet to see much evidence that the GDPR has led to an improvement in organisations’ data practices,” he said."

  • Judge Denies Petition to Unseal 13 Years of Government Surveillance Records

    Date published: 
    May 21, 2019

    "In a Stanford CIS blog post, Pfefferkorn said she found hope in the opinion. “For one, the court rejected the government’s unfounded attempt to argue that we lack standing to seek to unseal these records at all,” she wrote. “It is well-established that members of the public have standing to seek to unseal sealed court records, and the court refused to depart from that settled law.

  • You’re Not Alone When You’re on Google

    Date published: 
    May 17, 2019

    "“The danger that ‘privacy’ doesn’t capture is this idea of creep,” says Frischmann, an internet law expert at Villanova University. Like letting that random person into your Facebook circle, or — and this happened in Frischmann’s own life — seeing your child come home from school with a fitness tracking device, which may seem like a win-win (you get free tech; the child might learn about healthy habits) until you consider what it means.

    “You’re conditioning a generation of kids to accept bodily surveillance by others without question,” he says."

  • The Long and Lucrative Mirage of the Driverless Car

    Date published: 
    May 16, 2019

    "“You have more grounded expectations about the timeline for these technologies, combined with a lack of industry push for legislation,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who studies legislation of autonomous vehicles. “A lot of companies don’t yet know what they want.”"

  • Former U.S. Diplomat Convicted Of Threatening Arab American Group

    Date published: 
    May 10, 2019

    "That question is at the heart of hundreds of cases across the country and is likely to become more pressing as bias-motivated incidents rise in tandem with the country's political polarization, said Danielle Citron, a University of Maryland law professor and a leading scholar of hate crimes online. Her research shows that women and people from marginalized groups — racial and religious minorities — are the most frequently targeted for online harassment.

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