Press

CIS in the news.

  • Walmart wants to send people into your house to stock the fridge — even when you’re not home

    Date published: 
    September 22, 2017

    "“There are always unintended consequences that arise with these newfangled ideas,” said Albert Gidari, director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. “It might be creepy and intrusive, but there are also a lot of security risks and liability questions down the road: What happens if there’s a theft, or damage, or a dog bite? Will your homeowners’ policy cover that? How will insurance companies react to this?”"

  • The future of encryption depends on WhatsApp's battle with the UK

    Date published: 
    September 20, 2017

    "The UK may also be concerned about the legality of their own demand to access encrypted messages. Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography policy fellow at Stanford University, said she sees a legal battle coming if the UK continues to force the issue, but she doesn't necessarily think the UK wants that fight. 

  • Grab your popcorn: The first annual Privacy Shield review is go

    Date published: 
    September 18, 2017

    "Omer Tene, vice-president of research and education at the International Association of Privacy Professionals, agreed the review needs to look at how Privacy Shield is working in reality.

    "The EU will no doubt take a hard and close look at the deployment of Privacy Shield on the ground, including not only adherence by companies and oversight by the FTC, but also checks on government surveillance under the new US administration," Tene said."

  • AI can make justice truly blind — but not just yet

    Date published: 
    September 16, 2017

    "Civil liberty groups have warned against the inherent dangers of prejudiced AI in the legal system before. Law enforcement agencies now use tools to predict future crime, but several pressure groups argue that the system starts from a flawed and prejudiced base.

    “It’s polluted data producing polluted results,” said Malkia Cyril, executive director of the Center for Media Justice."

  • Fake news busters

    Date published: 
    September 15, 2017

    "As an outside technology adviser to Hillary Clinton’s failed 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, Scott has first-hand knowledge of how digital falsehoods can infiltrate — and, he would add, sway — an election.

  • Should Facebook Ads Be Regulated Like TV Commercials?

    Date published: 
    September 14, 2017

    "But Andrew McLaughlin, the cofounder of Higher Ground Labs, a company that invests in technology to help progressive candidates, believes that platforms should suppress propaganda in ad space. “Despite their best intentions, tech companies have built systems that are so open to manipulation by bots and trolls and other techniques that they effectively reward propaganda,” he says.

  • Illinois begins pilot project to put birth certificates on digital ledger technology

    Date published: 
    September 14, 2017

    "Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society Director of Privacy Albert Gidari agreed that blockchain is secure and Illinois’ move allows individuals to have better control over their government-issued ID.

    “Who you are depends on who the government says you are,” Gidari said, “and this really changes that dynamic and gives you data portability.”

    Gidari joked to not think of this as a dystopian future novel the likes of “A Brave New World,” but rather to think of it as a “better brave new world.”"

  • U.S. updates self-driving car guidelines as more hit the road

    Date published: 
    September 12, 2017

    "ince the new guidelines are policy, not law, they don't legally change what the state and federal government and vehicle developers can do, said Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina who tracks government policy on self-driving cars. Some countries, like South Korea, require pre-market government approval before autonomous vehicles can go out on the road, so the U.S. is on the more lenient side, Smith said."

  • This chatbot could help you sue Equifax

    Date published: 
    September 12, 2017

    "But a word of caution comes by way of Ryan Calo, a privacy expert and law professor at the University of Washington. 

    "You have to trust that the person who designed the bot knows what they're doing," Calo said. "A small error could invalidate whoever's using it, right?""

  • Driverless cars on public highways? Go for it, Trump administration says

    Date published: 
    September 12, 2017

    "“The new policy adjusts the tone but continues much of the substance of (the Obama administration) document,” said Bryant Walker Smith, law professor at the University of South Carolina. “It clearly reflects the input of the traditional automotive industry but doesn't exclude potential new entrants such as Waymo.”"

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