Press

CIS in the news.

  • Legal Precedent To Be Set On Smartphone Searches

    Date published: 
    February 18, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, talks to Holly Quan of KCBS about whether police searching cell phones at time of arrest without obtaining a search warrant violates privacy rights:

    New ground could be broken in a San Mateo County courtroom when a judge decides whether evidence collected from the warrantless search of a suspect's smartphone is admissible. Experts say the case speaks to how the law isn't keeping up with technology.

  • Judge To Decide If Police Can Search Cell Phones

    Date published: 
    February 17, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted in the San Mateo County Times on whether police searching cell phones without a search warrant violates a person's Fourth Amendment rights:

    Attorneys for a San Francisco man are trying to set a legal precedent that would force police to obtain a search warrant before going through the cell phone of a person who has been arrested.

  • Facebook Gripes Protected By Free Speech, Ruling Says

    Date published: 
    February 16, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted on a student's constitutional right to criticize her teacher on Facebook. Rich Phillips of CNN reports:

    A former Florida high school student who was suspended by her principal after she set up a Facebook page to criticize her teacher is protected constitutionally under the First Amendment, a federal magistrate ruled.

  • Google Apologizes for Buzz Fuss, Stops Automation

    Date published: 
    February 16, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted in CIO Today about the online privacy of Google users with regards to Google's launch of Buzz, it's social-media network:

    Google's Todd Jackson has apologized for the Google Buzz fiasco in which Gmail users contacts were made public without notice. In response to user complaints, Google has further tweaked Google Buzz so matchups and sharing are no longer automatic. A security lab reported that in just two days, a Google Buzz spammer had linked to 237 people.

  • Alameda DA Clears Brown's Office In Privacy Flap

    Date published: 
    February 5, 2010

    Alameda County's district attorney announced Thursday that Attorney General Jerry Brown's office did not break privacy laws by recording phone conversations with news reporters without their consent.

    Brown's office had asked District Attorney Nancy O'Malley to conduct the independent investigation into the repeated recordings made by communications director Scott Gerber, who resigned in November after news broke about his actions.

  • Does Mr. Roboto Need A Lawyer?

    Date published: 
    January 29, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is featured in a NBC video interview on robotics and the law. He comments that robotics law should model Internet law, in that manufacturers are not responsible for content built on platforms, just as websites have immunity from content posted on the Web:

    When the day comes that robots are living alongside humans, what happens if there's a malfunction of legal proportions?

  • Software And Application Evaluator WhatApp Nears Public Release

    Date published: 
    January 28, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society (CIS), discusses WhatApp, a project initiated by CIS to assess the security and privacy of software applications:

    This spring, a project under development to help assess the security and privacy of software applications will go public. WhatApp, an online resource where experts and the public alike can rate applications based on how well-behaved they are, will help consumers to exercise their privacy rights, said its project manager.

  • Former Boyfriend Used Craigslist To Arrange Woman's Rape, Police Say

    Date published: 
    January 11, 2010

    Center for Internet Fellow Ryan Calo talked to the LA Times' DeeDee Correll about the role of Craigslist in a criminal case involving Jebidiah James Stipe, a Marine stationed at Twentynine Palms, California who is a accused of using the free online advertising service to arrange the rape of his former girlfriend:

    A Wyoming man is accused of posing online as his former girlfriend and soliciting someone to act out a violent sexual fantasy.

    ...

    The advertisement appeared on Craigslist in early December.

  • Who Will Be Legally Responsible For Our New Robot Overlords?

    Date published: 
    December 8, 2009

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted in Above the Law's blog post on robotics and legal responsibility:

    It’s almost 2010. 2010! The future is here!

    So where, pray tell, are my freaking robots? When I was a kid, I was promised robots that would clean my house and prepare my meals and submit to my sexual perversions. Yet here we are, well into the 21st century, and there is not a robot slave to be found. What a ripoff. I’m so angry I feel like going back in time and killing John Connor.

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