Blog

Thoughts on Baltimore's ongoing ransomware situation

The people of Baltimore are beginning their fifth week under an electronic siege that has prevented residents from obtaining building permits and business licenses – and even buying or selling homes. A year after hackers disrupted the city’s emergency services dispatch system, city workers throughout the city are unable to, among other things, use their government email accounts or conduct routine city business. Read more about Thoughts on Baltimore's ongoing ransomware situation

Tool Without A Handle: Guerilla Information Warfare

The security of our news and media information systems matters as much as the security of personal and commercial information systems. "Information warfare" shows that harms can arise even when there is no unauthorized access, when tools are used as intended, and when there’s no compromise of user privacy settings. In both cases of cybersecurity and news/media security, the threats are asymmetric, the tools readily available, usable for many purposes, and threats are easily disguised as benign. Read more about Tool Without A Handle: Guerilla Information Warfare

Open Letter to GCHQ Regarding Threats Posed by their Ghost Proposal

Today I join several cybersecurity, civil liberties, civil society organizations and researchers in responding to the United Kingdom's GCHQ recent proposal to silently add 'ghost' users from law enforcement or the security services to online chats and calls, including those conducted via encrypted messaging tools like WhatApp, iMessage, or Signal. Read more about Open Letter to GCHQ Regarding Threats Posed by their Ghost Proposal

What Online Content Are We Regulating? Illegal Speech, Offensive Speech, and Platform Value

This discussion, excerpted from my Who Do You Sue article, very briefly reviews the implications of what I call “must-carry” arguments – claims that operators of major Internet platforms should be held to the same First Amendment standards as the government, and prevented from using their Terms of Service or Community Guidelines to prohibit lawful speech. Read more about What Online Content Are We Regulating? Illegal Speech, Offensive Speech, and Platform Value

Platform Content Regulation – Some Models and Their Problems

Lawmakers today are increasingly focused on their options for regulating the content we see on online platforms. I described several ambitious regulatory models for doing that in my recent paper, Who Do You Sue? State and Platform Hybrid Power Over Online Speech. This blog post excerpts that discussion, and sketches out potential legal regimes to address major platforms’ function as de facto gatekeepers of online speech and information. Read more about Platform Content Regulation – Some Models and Their Problems

Prominent security pros enter the 'Right to Repair' debate

I'm pleased to be part of the inaugural group of security professionals standing up for the rights of technology owners to repair, re-use, fix, modify, and enhance the many modern products they buy, use, and depend on for work and personal use.  Securepairs.Org is our voice on this critical architecture and public policy item, which has cybersecurity, operational, and resiliency considerations for every technology user. Read more about Prominent security pros enter the 'Right to Repair' debate

Pages

Subscribe to Stanford CIS Blog