Publications

Reply Comments on Telekom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) Consultation Paper on "Traffic Management Practices (TMPs) and Multi-Stakeholder Body for Net Neutrality"

Author(s): 
Barbara van Schewick
Publication Date: 
February 27, 2020
Publication Type: 
Regulatory Filing

On February 27, 2020, Barbara van Schewick, Professor of Law and (by Courtesy) Electrical Engineering and Director of the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, submitted Reply Comments to the Consultation by the Telekom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) on its Consultation Paper on "Traffic Management Practices (TMPs) and Multi-Stakeholder Body for Net Neutrality." Read more about Reply Comments on Telekom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) Consultation Paper on "Traffic Management Practices (TMPs) and Multi-Stakeholder Body for Net Neutrality"

Brief of Professors of Internet Law as Amici Curiae in Lawsuit over California Net Neutrality Law

Author(s): 
Barbara van Schewick
Publication Date: 
September 30, 2020
Publication Type: 
Litigation Brief

On September 30, 2020, a group of seven Professors of Internet Law, led by Barbara van Schewick, Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, filed a friend of the court brief in the lawsuit over the California net neutrality law.

Background  Read more about Brief of Professors of Internet Law as Amici Curiae in Lawsuit over California Net Neutrality Law

Are We Already Living in a Tech Dystopia?

Author(s): 
Albert Gidari
Publication Date: 
August 26, 2020
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

People should no more believe in dystopia than utopia. The fact is that technology has changed the world for so many for so long for the better—from reduction of disease to extending life to increased food and health—that to dismiss those gains is just know-nothingism. As with all technological advances, not everyone shares equally in the gains or benefits in the same way, and some may even experience disproportionately negative impacts, but that does not diminish the overall societal value of the advancements. Read more about Are We Already Living in a Tech Dystopia?

Redesigning Data Privacy: Reimagining Notice & Consent for human technology interaction

Author(s): 
Jen King
Publication Date: 
July 31, 2020
Publication Type: 
White Paper / Report

The World Economic Forum partnered with the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School and a community of policy-makers, researchers, civil society advocates, legal scholars, and industry and design practitioners to convene a set of conversations about the challenges of Notice & Consent as a norm for data collection and processing, particularly when it comes to the technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Read more about Redesigning Data Privacy: Reimagining Notice & Consent for human technology interaction

Schrems II Offers an Opportunity—If the U.S. Wants to Take It

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
July 28, 2020
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The Schrems II judgment by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) will reshape the relationship between national security and global data flows. By invalidating the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield agreement, the decision ends a two-decade transatlantic compromise on data exchange. The court found that U.S. surveillance practices were disproportionate and violated the fundamental rights of European Union citizens, who had no effective legal recourse to challenge potential U.S. abuses. Read more about Schrems II Offers an Opportunity—If the U.S. Wants to Take It

Cyberattack Attribution and International Law

Author(s): 
Kristen E. Eichensehr
Publication Date: 
July 24, 2020
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Earlier this week, the U.S. Department of Justice unsealed an indictment accusing two men linked to China’s Ministry of State Security of a decade-long campaign of hacking dissidents, human rights activists, and a variety of private sector targets, including most recently entities working on COVID-19 treatments, tests, and vaccines. Read more about Cyberattack Attribution and International Law

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