Publications

Protecting Journalism in the Digital Era

Author(s): 
Morgan Weiland
Publication Date: 
November 18, 2013
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Imagine that you are 
participating in a protest on a university campus. The campus 
police ask everyone to leave. Some protestors refuse to move, and suddenly
they are doused with pepper spray by campus police. You pull out your cell phone and start recording, asking protestors to describe what happened. After some editing, you post the video to YouTube. But according to the two federal shield laws being considered by Congress, you likely would not qualify as a journalist—and consequently would not enjoy the right to protect your sources. Read more » about Protecting Journalism in the Digital Era

The FAA's Drone Privacy Plan: Actually Pretty Sensible

Author(s): 
Ryan Calo
Publication Date: 
November 9, 2013
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Thursday felt like drone day. The Federal Aviation Administration released both its roadmap (PDF) to integrate private drones into domestic airspace and the privacy requirements (PDF) that that will apply to the half-dozen locations selected to be testing areas for this integration. Read more » about The FAA's Drone Privacy Plan: Actually Pretty Sensible

How to Make Revenge Porn a Crime

Author(s): 
Danielle Citron
Publication Date: 
November 7, 2013
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

During the course of a long-distance relationship, Holly Jacobs shared sexually explicit photos and videos with her ex-boyfriend. She trusted him to keep them private. After they broke up, Jacobs received an anonymous email with a link and a warning that “Someone is trying to make life very difficult for you.” When she clicked on the link, she discovered the nude images that she’d shared with her ex on a site hosting revenge porn—compromising photos, often put up by exes after a breakup, without the subject’s consent. Read more » about How to Make Revenge Porn a Crime

How to Copy Right

Author(s): 
Christopher Sprigman
Publication Date: 
November 8, 2013
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

In their essay “Fake It Till You Make It” (July/August 2013), Kal Raustiala and Christopher Sprigman urged the United States to “relax” when it comes to the flagrant disregard for intellectual property laws in China. The authors make two essential arguments: first, that the United States in its early days, like China today, was a “pirate nation,” and second, that copying drove the United States’ economic growth. Read more » about How to Copy Right

A Stronger ‘Online Eraser' Law Would be a Mistake

Author(s): 
Woodrow Hartzog
Publication Date: 
November 7, 2013
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Excited teenagers – in other words normal teenagers – have never been famous for consistently wise decisions, nor should they be. Trial and error is a critical part of growing up.

But the emergence and widespread uptake of social media has further complicated the ability of teenagers to put past issues behind them. What used to remain only in fading memories increasingly lingers in code on computer servers in the cloud. Read more » about A Stronger ‘Online Eraser' Law Would be a Mistake

We’re About to Lose Net Neutrality — And the Internet as We Know It

Author(s): 
Marvin Ammori
Publication Date: 
November 4, 2013
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Cross-posted from Wired Opinion.

Net neutrality is a dead man walking. The execution date isn’t set, but it could be days, or months (at best). And since net neutrality is the principle forbidding huge telecommunications companies from treating users, websites, or apps differently — say, by letting some work better than others over their pipes — the dead man walking isn’t some abstract or far-removed principle just for wonks: It affects the internet as we all know it. Read more » about We’re About to Lose Net Neutrality — And the Internet as We Know It

Why Is Facebook Putting Teens at Risk?

Author(s): 
Woodrow Hartzog
Publication Date: 
October 24, 2013
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

When Facebook Inc. recently lifted its restriction on public posts by teenagers, some privacy scholars applauded the move as a win for parents -- offering them a chance to teach their children about digital accountability. They may be overstating the case, however. If information and communication technologies aren’t designed to help users -- especially younger ones -- guard their information, appeals to good judgment and discipline won’t go very far. Read more » about Why Is Facebook Putting Teens at Risk?

We All Go Down Together: NSA Programs Overseas Violate Americans’ Privacy, Yet Escape FISC, Congressional Oversight

Author(s): 
Jennifer Granick
Publication Date: 
October 17, 2013
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Cross-posted from Just Security.

Ongoing revelations show that significant NSA surveillance activities take place outside of either Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) or congressional oversight, even though these policies directly impact Americans’ privacy. These activities should, at the very least, be subject to congressional review, since American interests are being adversely impacted by them. Read more » about We All Go Down Together: NSA Programs Overseas Violate Americans’ Privacy, Yet Escape FISC, Congressional Oversight

Pages

Subscribe to Publications