Publications

New EU Law Will Tell U.S. What Can Be Said — And Built — On the Internet

Author(s): 
Daphne Keller
Publication Date: 
October 14, 2015
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Americans have long been ignoring European data protection law, but it has not been ignoring us. Last year’s so-called “right to be forgotten” case from the EU’s highest court let people remove links about themselves from Google’s search results — and regulators insist that the links must disappear from U.S. search results, too. Read more » about New EU Law Will Tell U.S. What Can Be Said — And Built — On the Internet

Users' Patronage: The Return of the Gift in the "Crowd Society"

Author(s): 
Giancarlo Frosio
Publication Date: 
September 10, 2015
Publication Type: 
Academic Writing
In this work, I discuss the tension between gift and market economy throughout the history of creativity. For millennia, the production of creative artifacts has lain at the intersection between gift and market economy. From the time of Pindar and Simonides – and until the Romanticism will commence a process leading to the complete commodification of creative artifacts – market exchange models run parallel to gift exchange. From Roman amicitia to the medieval and Renaissance belief that “scientia donum dei est, unde vendi non potest,” creativity has been repeatedly construed as a gift.

The Special Rapporteur on Torture’s Report on Extraterritoriality Speaks to Migrant Crisis

Author(s): 
Beth Van Schaack
Publication Date: 
October 7, 2015
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture, Juan E. Méndez, has issued a new expert’s report (his 17th)—this one on extraterritoriality. (JustSecurity’s extensive coverage of the extraterritoriality of states’ human rights obligations can be found here). Read more » about The Special Rapporteur on Torture’s Report on Extraterritoriality Speaks to Migrant Crisis

This privacy activist has just won an enormous victory against U.S. surveillance. Here’s how.

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
October 6, 2015
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The European Court of Justice, Europe’s highest court, has just ruled that the Safe Harbor, an arrangement between the European Union and the United States allowing for the transfer of personal data, is legally invalid. Few non-specialists have heard of the Safe Harbor. Even so, this ruling is going to send shock waves through both Europe and the United States. Here’s how it happened (we talk about the implications in a separate post). Read more » about This privacy activist has just won an enormous victory against U.S. surveillance. Here’s how.

Here’s how the Facebook case has just transformed the surveillance debate

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
October 6, 2015
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The European Court of Justice, Europe’s highest court, has just shot down the Safe Harbor, an arrangement between the European Union and the United States allowing for the transfer of personal data, in a case against Facebook. This has the potential to transform arguments between the E.U. and United States over privacy and surveillance. The decision is complex, and lawyers will be arguing over its more subtle implications for years. Read more » about Here’s how the Facebook case has just transformed the surveillance debate

Facebook is at the center of a huge privacy controversy. For once, it isn’t Facebook’s fault.

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
September 25, 2015
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The Advocate-General of the European Court of Justice, the European Union’s closest equivalent to the U.S. Supreme Court, has just made a key finding in a court case involving Facebook. If the court follows his recommendation – which it does 80 percent of the time – either the U.S. will have to change its laws on surveillance or companies like Facebook and Google will find their European business models undermined.

This time, it’s not Facebook’s fault Read more » about Facebook is at the center of a huge privacy controversy. For once, it isn’t Facebook’s fault.

Why are working class kids less likely to get elite jobs? They study too hard at college.

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
September 23, 2015
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Lauren Rivera is an associate professor of management and organizations at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of management. Her recent book, “Pedigree: How Elite Students Get Elite Jobs,” examines how inequality is produced by subtle social patterns of education and informal skills as well as big political and economic forces. I asked her four questions about the book. Read more » about Why are working class kids less likely to get elite jobs? They study too hard at college.

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