Publications

A Robot Really Committed A Crime: Now What?

Author(s): 
Ryan Calo
Publication Date: 
December 23, 2014
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

It is always fun, and sometimes worrying, to see imagination come to life. I was on a panel last year at UC Berkeley around robotics and law. We talked about some of the conundrums robots and artificial intelligence might pose for law and policy–the subject of my forthcoming work Robotics and the Lessons of CyberlawOne hypothetical involved a shopping “bot” that randomly purchases items on the Internet. Read more » about A Robot Really Committed A Crime: Now What?

Will the FCC ruin the Internet?

Author(s): 
Barbara van Schewick
Publication Date: 
November 7, 2014
Publication Type: 
Other Writing
The results of the midterm election confirm Americans' widespread discontent with Washington gridlock on a range of issues.
 
In the last few months, millions of people contacted the White House, Congress and federal agencies to demand action on one of those issues -- protecting a free and open Internet.
 

Does the FCC really not get it about the Internet?

Author(s): 
Brett Frischmann
Publication Date: 
October 31, 2014
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The key to an open Internet is nondiscrimination and in particular, a prohibition on discrimination or prioritization based on the identity of the user (sender/receiver) or use (application/content). I explain why at length in my book, Infrastructure: The Social Value of Shared Resources (2012). Read more » about Does the FCC really not get it about the Internet?

Lohan, Noriega video game lawsuits are a troubling sign for the arts

Publication Date: 
October 30, 2014
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Former Panamanian strongman Manuel Noriega and actress Lindsay Lohan have at least one thing in common: Both recently filed high-profile lawsuits against video game makers, charging that their likenesses were used in games without their permission.

These suits may seem like acts of desperation by people now more notorious than famous, and a judge has already ruled against Noriega. But they are nevertheless extremely worrying. Read more » about Lohan, Noriega video game lawsuits are a troubling sign for the arts

Comments on Mozilla's Proposal

Author(s): 
Barbara van Schewick
Publication Date: 
October 30, 2014
Publication Type: 
White Paper / Report

Mozilla has suggested that the FCC should classify a newly defined service, which it calls “remote edge provider delivery service,” as a telecommunications service. This service, as defined by Mozilla, is offered by broadband Internet access providers to providers of Internet applications, content or services (“edge providers”) and encompasses the transport of an individual edge provider’s data across the ISP’s access network to and from all of an ISP’s subscribers. According to Mozilla, this classification would allow the FCC to adopt rules banning blocking, discrimination, and access fees under Title II of the Communications Act. Read more » about Comments on Mozilla's Proposal

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