Publications

A Financial Times columnist says that taxes have nothing to do with fairness. Here’s why he’s wrong.

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
April 12, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

One of the people to suffer fallout from the Panama Papers leak is David Cameron, Britain’s prime minister. After a few days of equivocation, he was forced to admit that he had personally benefited from offshore financial arrangements that had been put in place by his father.

The publicly available evidence does not suggest that he did anything illegal. Nonetheless, this has led to political debate in Britain about the fairness of a tax system in which the rich and privileged are able to take advantage of offshore tax shelters and the like to limit their tax liability.

How Governments Can Clear the Road for Self-Driving Cars

Author(s): 
Bryant Walker Smith
Publication Date: 
April 8, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

So you've decided that your state should have self-driving cars. How, then, do you catch the attention of the Googles, Volvos and Navyas of the world that are developing and even deploying these vehicles?

How RightsCon brings press freedom, technology and social change together

Author(s): 
Geoffrey King
Publication Date: 
March 28, 2016
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

This week in San Francisco, CPJ's Technology and Advocacy teams will participate in RightsCon 2016, an annual conference focusing on human rights and technology. Organized by digital rights group Access Now, RightsCon is one of the most important regular gatherings on technology policy, and the conference has been the site of effective discussions around issues that affect journalists and journalism. We expect this year to be no different.

Digital Piracy Debunked: a Short Note on Digital Threats and Intermediary Liability

Author(s): 
Giancarlo Frosio
Publication Date: 
March 23, 2016
Publication Type: 
Academic Writing
In the last two decades, the industry has deployed endlessly the rhetoric of the “digital threat” in order to demand harsher measures against digital piracy. Recently, the “digital threat” discourse called for enhanced liability of online intermediaries, especially those whose platforms may be used to infringe copyright. This short paper shows that the “digital threat” discourse is based on shaky grounds. Two related arguments might run against this approach. First, market conditions might incentivise piracy.

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