Academic Writing

FBI's human rights investigators critical to prosecuting 'atrocity crimes'

Author(s): 
Beth Van Schaack
Publication Date: 
February 22, 2019
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

For over seven decades, the United States has stood as the cornerstone of a rules-based global system that arose from the ashes of World War II, organizing and leading a united group of nations as they held major violators to account at international tribunals convened in Nuremberg and Tokyo. Read more about FBI's human rights investigators critical to prosecuting 'atrocity crimes'

How far should organizations be able to go to defend against cyberattacks?

Author(s): 
Scott Shackelford
Publication Date: 
February 15, 2019
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The deluge of cyberattacks sweeping across the world has governments and companies thinking about new ways to protect their digital systems, and the corporate and state secrets stored within. For a long time, cybersecurity experts have erected firewalls to keep out unwanted traffic and set up decoy targets on their networks to distract hackers who do get in. Read more about How far should organizations be able to go to defend against cyberattacks?

EXCLUSIVE: FBI’s War Crimes Unit on the Chopping Block

Author(s): 
Beth Van Schaack
Publication Date: 
February 10, 2019
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

[UPDATED] A special unit within the Federal Bureau of Investigation that handles war crimes may be shut down imminently, according to officials familiar with the administration’s decision-making process. The FBI’s International Human Rights Unit takes the lead on investigating individuals within the United States who have been accused of committing international crimes, including war crimes, torture, genocide, female genital mutilation, and the recruitment of child soldiers. Read more about EXCLUSIVE: FBI’s War Crimes Unit on the Chopping Block

People used to joke about ‘Democrats in disarray.’ They’re not joking now.

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
January 30, 2019
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The comedian Will Rogers famously joked: “I am not a member of any organized political party. I am a Democrat.” Until relatively recently, neither Republicans nor Democrats were particularly organized. Instead, they were loose coalitions of politicians with very different ideologies. Sam Rosenfeld is an assistant professor at Colgate University. Read more about People used to joke about ‘Democrats in disarray.’ They’re not joking now.

Who Do You Sue? State and Platform Hybrid Power Over Online Speech

Author(s): 
Daphne Keller
Publication Date: 
January 29, 2019
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

This essay closely examines the effect on free-expression rights when platforms such as Facebook or YouTube silence their users’ speech. The first part describes the often messy blend of government and private power behind many content removals, and discusses how the combination undermines users’ rights to challenge state action. The second part explores the legal minefield for users—or potentially, legislators—claiming a right to speak on major platforms. Read more about Who Do You Sue? State and Platform Hybrid Power Over Online Speech

The problem with Brexit is that there’s no obvious next step

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
January 16, 2019
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

No one was surprised that British Prime Minister Theresa May’s proposed Brexit deal was rejected Tuesday by the House of Commons. What was surprising was that the vote was 432 to 202. Normally, such a humiliating defeat would lead to the resignation of the prime minister. That is highly unlikely to happen: May will continue as prime minister, while Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s motion of no confidence is unlikely to succeed. However, it’s hard to see an alternative deal that would pass muster with both the House of Commons and the European Union. Read more about The problem with Brexit is that there’s no obvious next step

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