Academic Writing

Courtroom “Feud” Leaves Accurate Speech About Celebrities Unprotected

Author(s): 
Daniel Nazer
Publication Date: 
October 10, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

The first season of FX’s drama Feud told the story of the rivalry between Bette Davis and Joan Crawford. Set in Hollywood during the early sixties, the drama portrays numerous real-life figures from the era. Catherine Zeta-Jones appeared as Olivia de Havilland. Unfortunately, de Havilland did not enjoy the show.

We know that evidence-based medicine works. So why don’t politicians support it?

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
October 3, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Eric M. Patashnik, Alan S. Gerber and Conor M. Dowling’s new book, “Unhealthy Politics: The Battle over Evidence-Based Medicine,” provides some very important insights into the role that evidence does (and doesn’t play) in U.S. policymaking. I asked Patashnik, a professor of public policy and political science at Brown University, about the book’s major findings.

Jesner: A Guide to the Blogosphere

Author(s): 
Beth Van Schaack
Publication Date: 
September 30, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

As part of our symposium of Jesner v. Arab Bank case, we are offering this annotated guide to previous coverage of the case in the blogosphere, including another online symposium on the SCOTUS blog featuring a contribution on the relevance of the post-WWII prosecutions by yours truly.

SCOTUS BLOG Symposium

Diversity isn’t just about justice. It’s about helping us make better collective decisions.

Author(s): 
Henry Farrell
Publication Date: 
September 28, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Scott Page is a professor of political science at the University of Michigan, and the author of The Diversity Bonus, a new book based on his research on diversity and collective decision-making (some of which has been developed and presented at workshops organized by the MacArthur Network on Opening Governance). I asked him questions about the implications of his work.

Libya’s Haftar and Liability of Superiors: Ordering Offenses v. Responsibility for Omissions

Author(s): 
Beth Van Schaack
Publication Date: 
September 20, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Further to Just Security‘s coverage on Tuesday of the potential war crimes liability of U.S citizen/Libyan warlord General Khalifa Haftar, this article discusses the distinction under international criminal law between (1) ordering the commission of offenses and (2) being found liable under the doctrine of superior responsibility for failing to prevent or punish the commission of abuses by subordinates.

Congress's sloppy new internet bill is a step in the wrong direction

Author(s): 
Daphne Keller
Publication Date: 
September 18, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Most observers cheered when the neo-Nazi Daily Stormer was booted from YouTube, CloudFlare, and other platforms around the Internet. At the same time, the site’s disappearance stirred anxiety about Internet companies’ power over online speech. It starkly illustrated how online speech can live or die at the discretion of private companies. The modern public square is in private hands.

Privacy and the Dark Side of Control

Author(s): 
Woodrow Hartzog
Publication Date: 
September 4, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

To hear some in industry and government tell it, the answer to our modern privacy dilemma is simple: give users more control.  There is seemingly no privacy-relevant arena, from social media to big data to biometrics that cannot be remedied with a heaping dose of personal control. Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg said “What people want isn’t complete privacy. It isn’t that they want secrecy.

Every Cop Involved in the Arrest of This Utah Nurse for Refusing to (Illegally) Draw a Patient’s Blood Needs to Be Fired

Author(s): 
Scott Shackelford
Publication Date: 
September 1, 2017
Publication Type: 
Other Writing

Shall we ease into our Labor Day weekend with an absolutely repulsive video of a police detective abusing his authority against a completely innocent person for no real justifiable reason? Oh, why not?

Behold, Salt Lake City Police Det. Jeff Payne arresting Nurse Alex Wubbels in July for refusing to violate an unconscious—comatose, actually—man's rights by drawing his blood for the police without any sort of warrant whatsoever:

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