Press

CIS in the news.

  • Could California Effectively Restore Net Neutrality for the Entire Country?

    Date published: 
    March 14, 2018

    "Barbara van Schewick, a law professor at Stanford University who specializes in internet regulation, doesn’t believe the the FCC’s pre-emption clause will hold water. According to case law “the FCC can only prevent the states from adopting net neutrality protections if the FCC has authority to adopt net neutrality protections itself,” van Schewick wrote in a blog post on Wednesday.

  • Smart Speakers Will Soon Talk to Police. That’s Not As Bad As It Sounds.

    Date published: 
    March 13, 2018

    "“Personalized computing devices are incredibly valuable in terms of the data they collect about us and the data they provide to us,” said Brian Nussbaum, assistant professor at the University of Albany who teaches cybersecurity and homeland security. “It would be surprising if law enforcement did not want to try and leverage these flows of data to and from citizens to the extent that they can.”"

  • Mar Tech Preps As GDPR Looms

    Date published: 
    March 13, 2018

    "Many will insist it’s all de-identified and anonymized, said Omer Tene, VP and chief knowledge officer at the International Association of Privacy Professionals.

    “But drill a bit deeper and you’ll find that while they might not have direct identifiers like a person’s name or social security number, they do collect, process and store personal data under GDPR,” he said."

  • Gray Hat

    Date published: 
    March 6, 2018

    "Even Hutchins’s defenders say if he’s guilty some punishment is in order, but his prosecution also sends a mixed message. Hutchins had been a model of public-private cooperation at a time when the government was having difficulty recruiting cybersecurity talent. (James Comey irritated the community in 2014 when he said the FBI struggled to hire people because “some of those kids want to smoke weed on the way to the interview.”) Some security researchers said they would stop sharing information with the government in protest.

  • Twitter's tribute to women rings hollow for some targets of abuse

    Date published: 
    March 5, 2018

    "University of Maryland law professor Danielle Citron, who studies online harassment, said there's a disconnect between the outside perception of Twitter and harassment and what's happening internally. Citron has been working closely with Twitter's trust and safety team on issues of online harassment for more than two years.

    "I'm not a cynic about [the ad]," she told CNN. "It's reflective of who the safety team is and I'm encouraged by it."

  • Uber 'Surprised' by Totally Unsurprising Pennsylvania Data Breach Lawsuit

    Date published: 
    March 5, 2018

    ""Given the alleged facts in this case, it wouldn't surprise me at all to see more lawsuits," says Woodrow Hartzog, a law and computer science professor at Northeastern University who studies privacy and data protection issues. "Oftentimes you will have state attorneys general who might even work together if that appears to be the best course of action. They'll probably be using the facts in this case as an example of how not to respond to a data breach.""

  • Repealing Net Neutrality Could Kill Indie Porn

    Date published: 
    February 28, 2018

    "Ryan Singel, Media and Strategy Fellow at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, explained that on a neutral net, service providers function as common carriers, meaning they can’t refuse or prioritize access to certain sites (so long as what’s on them is legal). ISPs have long sought to extract more money from highly trafficked sites.

  • How to Turn Off Facebook's Face Recognition Features

    Date published: 
    February 28, 2018

    ""Using facial recognition to help the visually impaired or as a tool to identify and combat cyber harassment is notable, because the positive uses of facial recognition technology are pretty limited to fun and maybe authentication," says Woodrow Hartzog, a law and computer science professor at Northeastern University who studies privacy and data protection. "It's interesting now to see different uses. We collectively need to watch that to see how it plays out.""

  • Driverless cars given green light to operate in California

    Date published: 
    February 27, 2018

    “We will continue to see a mix of approaches in other states. Many are likely to have far less regulation than California,” said Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor at the University of South Carolina’s law school, who writes regularly about autonomous driving."

  • How The US Government Handles Its Massive Stash Of Bitcoins

    Date published: 
    February 25, 2018

    "Earlier this year, Arvind Narayanan, a professor at Princeton, conducted research about coins that are burnt and forever unspendable. “We have all heard stories of cryptocurrency owners losing private keys, and it is impossible to estimate how many coins have been lost this way,” he said."

  • Military, FBI, and ICE Are Customers of Controversial ‘Stalkerware’

    Date published: 
    February 23, 2018

    "While not talking about any individual in particular, Riana Pfefferkorn, cryptography fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, told Motherboard that “Cops abuse their romantic partners at much higher rates than the general population. So a member of law enforcement could buy this software for purposes of intimate partner abuse while having a convenient cover story of needing it for his job.”"

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