Press

CIS in the news.

  • You Give Apps Sensitive Personal Information. Then They Tell Facebook.

    Date published: 
    February 22, 2019

    "Privacy lawyers say the collection of health data by nonhealth entities is legal in most U.S. states, provided there is sufficient disclosure in an app’s and Facebook’s terms of service. The Federal Trade Commission has taken an interest in cases in which data sharing deviates widely from what users might expect, particularly if any explanation was hard for users to find, said Woodrow Hartzog, a professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University."

  • Pinterest Blocks Vaccination Searches in Move to Control the Conversation

    Date published: 
    February 20, 2019

    "“There’s a secretive process with no real appeal where people are making extremely difficult subjective calls that have to do with politics, culture and religion,” said Jennifer Granick, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union. “This example shows why it is dangerous. If I want to find good information about vaccines, I can’t find it.”"

  • Should we be worried about 'killer' AI robots?

    Date published: 
    February 19, 2019

    "However, speaking to BBC Three, Professor Peter Asaro, vice chair of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control, shared his concerns about battlefield AI and wonders if it could ever be used against civilians.

    "The issue is that computers aren’t capable of determining when it’s legally or morally acceptable to take human life, and can’t be held morally or legally responsible for doing so. 

  • FBI is dismantling its war crimes unit

    Date published: 
    February 15, 2019

    "“These are difficult cases to prove because they need rock-solid investigations,” said Beth Van Schaack, a law professor at Stanford University who was deputy ambassador-at-large for war crimes issues in the Obama administration. Scrapping the FBI unit “is inevitably going to jeopardize prosecutions,” she said."

  • Legal Scholars Dive into Implications of Deep Fakes

    Date published: 
    February 15, 2019

    "“Imagine the night before an IPO, a deep fake video of the CEO comes out of the CEO soliciting a child prostitute or doing drugs,” University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law professor and privacy expert Danielle Citron, JD, said to a full house in the school’s Ceremonial Moot Courtroom.

    “There goes the IPO, and the faith of the marketplace for the CEO is wrecked,” she continued."

  • Call to ban killer robots in wars

    Date published: 
    February 15, 2019

    "According to Peter Asaro, of the New School in New York, such a scenario raises issues of legal liability if the system makes an unlawful killing.

    "The delegation of authority to kill to a machine is not justified and a violation of human rights because machines are not moral agents and so cannot be responsible for making decisions of life and death.

    "So it may well be that the people who made the autonomous weapon are responsible.""

  • Agency Might Have Overstated Tesla Autopilot's Safety Impact

    Date published: 
    February 14, 2019

    "“The lesson here is a need for candor,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a driverless-vehicle law expert at the University of South Carolina. “What does it mean to be trustworthy in this field?”

    Companies, regulatory agencies and politicians, Smith said, need to communicate clearly: “This is what we’re doing, this is why we think it’s safe, and this is why you should believe us.”"

  • Scientists call for ban on lethal, autonomous robots

    Date published: 
    February 14, 2019

    "None of the panelists said they were seeking to bar the use of robotics in all military applications. However, a sharp moral line should be drawn when it comes to robots or autonomous systems that can decide on their own when to use lethal force without “supervision or meaningful human control,” said Peter Asaro, an associate professor at the New School in New York and co-founder of an organization of scientists and technologists in support of robot arms control."

  • The gloomy saga of Article 13 just got a whole lot worse

    Date published: 
    February 13, 2019

    "“Article 13 creates more or less limitless liability with extraordinarily narrow exemptions,” says Annemarie Bridy, an academic intellectual property and technology lawyer at the University of Idaho. “The result will be that a few platforms will be positioned in terms of resources to operate with the related risk and expense. The rest will either stop hosting user-generated content, which would be a shame, or continue to do it until they get hit with an existentially threatening lawsuit, and fold.”"

  • Trump’s Plan to Keep America First in AI

    Date published: 
    February 11, 2019

    "Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington, says it’s good to see the White House taking AI and its effects seriously. He also says it will take time to know whether the Trump administration is properly attending to the ethical and human rights questions raised by AI. “Are they aware enough of its social impacts and thinking about the effects on society and how to address the problems it creates?” Calo says. “That’s what we have to watch for.”"

  • Trump signs executive order to boost AI technology

    Date published: 
    February 11, 2019

    "Ryan Calo, a cyber law expert at the University of Washington, told The Hill that Trump's executive order appears to incorporate some elements of former President Obama's AI plan.

    Calo, the cyber law expert, told The Hill there needs to be an examination of "the way in which artificial intelligence can be biased, the way it can disproportionately harm vulnerable populations."

    He said government needs to regulate how it procures AI technologies "so that we don’t 'unleash AI' on the world without thinking about its social impacts.""

  • Inside the Secret Facebook War For Mormon Hearts and Minds

    Date published: 
    February 9, 2019

    "“The business model of delivering messages according to customer lists or email addresses—we have all heard of that,” said Omer Tene, chief knowledge officer at the International Association of Privacy Professionals and an affiliate scholar at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society. “But this is something I never thought about, and it definitely pushes the envelope… This is not a washer-dryer. It’s religious faith.”"

  • Most Sextortion Victims Aren’t Billionaires

    Date published: 
    February 8, 2019

    "“Law is pretty much a blunt instrument here,” said Danielle Citron, a law professor at University of Maryland who wrote the book Hate Crimes in Cyberspace. “It’s modest in what it can do because it requires law enforcement to care and it requires the victim to have the resources to pursue.” All too often, these victims aren’t even given the potential out of making a deal."

  • The big risk to your privacy when you take a home DNA test

    Date published: 
    February 7, 2019

    "“We worry about this in the privacy space,” says Jennifer King, director of consumer privacy at the Center for Internet and Society Stanford Law School. “Your DNA is uniquely identifiable, it’s what makes you, you.  This gets into a whole new realm of privacy concerns.”"

  • Google Home's Assistant could one day know your mood. Take that, Alexa

    Date published: 
    February 7, 2019

    "Huffman won't speculate on the types of regulation, but Jen King, director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, has an idea of what legislation could look like. She's currently researching the types of data collected through smart speakers.

    She says we should all pay attention to what defaults Google and other companies set on their devices in the future, to make sure people aren't unwittingly giving up personal information.

  • Following national scandals, North Dakota lawmaker argues for consumer rights on data privacy bill

    Date published: 
    February 6, 2019

    "Kasper’s legislation was supported by Ryan Harkins, the director of state affairs and public policy at Microsoft, who said the bill would impose the country’s strongest privacy protections. He called on legislators to “modernize” privacy laws to alleviate anxieties over the increased collection of personal data by large technology firms.

  • Attacking a Pay Wall That Hides Public Court Filings

    Date published: 
    February 4, 2019

    "“Federal courts need to be providing this access without charge,” said Stephen W. Smith, who was until recently a federal magistrate judge in Houston and who signed a supporting brief. “There are too many downsides to creating these barriers. If you don’t give effective access to these records, it undermines courts’ legitimacy.”"

Pages