Press

CIS in the news.

  • The Cybersecurity 202: Justice Department to mount another encryption push despite setbacks

    Date published: 
    July 24, 2018

    "The encryption push may be harder now that the public knows about law enforcement's errors. “DOJ has had years to 'collect accurate metrics' on encryption's impact on investigations on prosecutions, but the only number it has ever provided to the public is the one the DOJ had to admit was inaccurate,” said Riana Pfefferkorn, cryptography fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. “If they're serious about this, they should release those metrics once they have them, plus info about how they arrived at those numbers.”"

  • Uber fills 'critical' role of chief privacy officer

    Date published: 
    July 18, 2018

    "But Albert Gidari, consulting director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, said it's not unusual to see a tech company without a CPO.

    "While there have been some very public mistakes, like many tech companies, [Uber] seems to have learned, albeit the hard way, to invest in a serious privacy and security infrastructure," Gidari said. "It is important for the CPO to be in the "C" suite, and Uber has made a serious hire with Ruby Zefo and Simon Hania.""

  • Lawmakers Don't Grasp the Sacred Tech Law They Want to Gut

    Date published: 
    July 17, 2018

    "Nowhere in the statute does it say that tech companies are prohibited from making editorial decisions if they want Section 230 protections. Quite the opposite. "It urges companies to filter and to block offensive content," says Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and author of the book Hate Crimes in Cyberspace. "Congress wanted to let companies filter dirty words and shield kids, without being held responsible for doing it incompletely. The idea that 230 requires neutrality is to fundamentally misunderstand it.""

  • Bots of the Internet, Reveal Yourselves!

    Date published: 
    July 16, 2018

    "Mr. Calo cited as an example a driverless car law passed by Nevada in 2012, which met with protest from luxury carmakers. They were miffed that the technologies in their cars fell under the loosely drawn definition of autonomous vehicles. The bill was revised and passed the following year.

    “Embarrassingly it was the first definition of artificial intelligence I’ve ever seen in a state statute, and they had to strike it out and rewrite it,” Mr. Calo said."

  • How AT&T’s plan to become the new Facebook could be a privacy nightmare

    Date published: 
    July 16, 2018

    "“It’s tens of billions of dollars on the table, at a minimum. So of course they want to be in this market,” says Jonathan Mayer, an assistant professor at Princeton University who studies the intersection of technology and law. “It’s plausible because they have untapped data,” he adds. “They have info about what their customers do when they use home internet connections.

  • How Wireless Carriers Get Permission to Share Your Whereabouts

    Date published: 
    July 15, 2018

    "“That was a green light for telecommunications carriers to monetize customer location data,” said Stanford University law professor Al Gidari, who helped draft the location-data guidelines that wireless industry group CTIA used to self-regulate. He said the FCC has been “woefully inadequate” at policing the carriers’ use of location information."

  • US: Government Has Planted Spy Phones With Suspects

    Date published: 
    July 13, 2018

    "Even if authorized by a warrant, the dissemination of vulnerable devices could create a risk of significant harm. Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography fellow at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, told Human Rights Watch it would be “frightening to use a wiretap order to authorize seeding compromised devices among people.” She suggested that anyone who might accept such a tactic when the targets are suspected drug traffickers should consider a hypothetical scenario in which agents secretly gave such non-secure devices to “journalists or activists.”"

  • 'Data is a fingerprint': why you aren't as anonymous as you think online

    Date published: 
    July 13, 2018

    "“Once our data gets out there, it tends to be stored forever,” said Arvind Narayanan, a Princeton computer science professor. “There are firms that specialise in combining data about us from different sources to create virtual dossiers and applying data mining to influence us in various ways.”"

  • Two Senators Call for Investigation of Smart TV Industry

    Date published: 
    July 12, 2018

    "“In terms of practical things the F.T.C. could do, one is filing additional enforcement actions, which, in addition to curtailing individual companies’ practices, can send a powerful ‘clean up your act’ message to industries,” said Jonathan Mayer, an assistant professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University and a former technology adviser at the Federal Communications Commission."

  • El Chapo's Lawyers want to Suppress Evidence from Spyware Used to Catch Cheating Spouses

    Date published: 
    July 11, 2018

    "Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography fellow at the Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, said FlexiSPY is “kind of an app version of a wire.” Wiretaps are the traditional monitoring tool used by law enforcement after obtaining a warrant signed by a judge.

    “It can be done quickly, but it’s not something that can be done remotely,” Pfefferkorn said. “That raises the question for me of whether this was a U.S. law enforcement agency that installed this on Chapo’s phone, if it was his phone.”"

  • Uber axes 100 ‘operator’ positions in self-driving cars

    Date published: 
    July 11, 2018

    "Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor at the University of South Carolina’s law school, who writes regularly about autonomous driving, said Uber’s training of drivers had to strike a tricky balance. “Give a driver too little to do, and they’ll get complacent. Give them too much to do, and they’ll get overwhelmed,” he said. “It’s possible that Uber’s trying to find the sweet spot between the two.

  • The Cybersecurity 202: Privacy advocates blast Kavanaugh for government surveillance support

    Date published: 
    July 11, 2018

    "Kavanaugh could be a “potential vote for retrenchment on privacy and the Fourth Amendment,” said Albert Gidari, director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. As Kavanaugh moves through the confirmation process, he added, “I don't think there will be any surprises, as his unabashed view that national security trumps privacy is pretty clearly articulated in Klayman.”

    “In short,” Gidari said, “the privacy community isn't having cocktails over this one.”"

  • Criminal case sheds light on Apple self-driving car technology

    Date published: 
    July 10, 2018

    "The technical detail in the complaint "would only have been possible if Apple complied" with investigators, said Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina who has studied issues around autonomous vehicles. Given the fact that even more technical details could come out at trial, "that's striking in its own right" and shows the importance Apple places on protecting its technology, he said."

  • Why California’s new consumer privacy law won’t be GDPR 2.0

    Date published: 
    July 9, 2018

    "“For the major online platforms, I think this law will have very little impact,” said Jonathan Mayer, assistant professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University and former chief technologist of the Federal Communications Commission."

  • The Cybersecurity 202: Spyware theft case offers a cautionary tale for encryption debate

    Date published: 
    July 6, 2018

    "“There's nothing preventing an Apple employee from doing the exact same thing in a world where there's mandatory key escrow for exceptional access to smartphones,” said Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. “Once the deed is done by an insider, then what was supposed to be a tool only for the ‘good guys’ is out there for the ‘bad guys’ as well.”"

  • Facebook Found “Hate Speech” in the Declaration of Independence

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2018

    "Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland who works with Facebook’s non-consensual intimate images advisory group in an unpaid capacity, says that the episode could point to the limits of algorithms in flagging hate speech. Hate speech is about context, she says, which algorithms struggle to detect.

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