Press

CIS in the news.

  • Tulane, Southern law clinics offer entrepreneurs intellectual property help

    Date published: 
    October 22, 2017

    ""We get questions all the time about, 'Can you help me with my patent?' But we couldn't until we got certification," said Elizabeth Townsend Gard, a Tulane Law School faculty member and co-director of the Tulane Center for IP, Media & Culture.

    Townsend Gard said in each of the past three years, her intellectual property class has done about 100 trademark searches for people.

  • A Big Test of Police Body Cameras Defies Expectations

    Date published: 
    October 20, 2017

    "“This is the most important empirical study on the impact of police body-worn cameras to date,” said Harlan Yu from Upturn, a Washington, D.C., nonprofit consulting company that studies how technology affects social issues. It was not directly involved in the research. “The results call into question whether police departments should be adopting body-worn cameras, given their high cost.”"

  • What happens to your email after you die?

    Date published: 
    October 18, 2017

    "Albert Gidari, director of privacy for Stanford University Law School’s Center for Internet and Society in California, thoroughly disagrees with his colleagues on the east coast. He told Quartz (in an email, of course) that the Massachusetts decision was “nonsense” and that this question didn’t even really need resolving.

  • 2017’s States Most Vulnerable to Identity Theft & Fraud

    Date published: 
    October 18, 2017

    "What measures can authorities undertake in order to avoid cases like the recent Equifax leaks? Should credit bureaus be tested for security breaches by authorities on a regular basis? If so, would the CFPB play a larger role in regulation and enforcement of bureaus? 

  • Smart cities are making the places we live more vulnerable to attacks

    Date published: 
    October 12, 2017

    "Brian Nussbaum, assistant professor at the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs at the State University of New York at Albany, said in the report that “the real question is the tier below these large global cities.”

    “The NYPD [New York Police Department] has 35,000 police officers, which is almost three times the size of the FBI, so they have the capacity to specialize and work on these things in ways that even the top 20 cities in terms of population don’t.”"

  • No One Knows What a Self-Driving Car Is, And It's Becoming a Problem

    Date published: 
    October 12, 2017

    "This could prove a problem for automakers as well as customers. “What you call something can be a kind of implicit promise that the feature is capable of behaving safely under certain circumstances,” says Ryan Calo, who specializes in cyber law and robotics at the University of Washington’s School of Law. A judge or jury could interpret Autopilot or ProPilot as a pledge that a vehicle can, well, pilot itself, regardless of the fine print."

  • California Wants to Make Your Robocar Dreams Come True

    Date published: 
    October 11, 2017

    "Congress may finally be hacking away at national legislation that would firmly delineate who is responsible for regulating what about autonomous cars, but California has a big role to play here. “California is special,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a legal scholar with the University of South Carolina School of Law who studies self-driving vehicles.

  • This is why tech companies won’t disclose content of Russian ads

    Date published: 
    October 11, 2017

    "“I've worked with this statute for 20 years and I learn something new every time I look at it,” Albert Gidari, the Director of Privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society who has previously represented Google and Facebook on ECPA issues. “It's exceedingly complex.”"

  • NVIDIA AI platform promises fully autonomous taxis by 2018: Is it possible?

    Date published: 
    October 10, 2017

    "However, it's important to remember that this is a processing platform, Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant law professor at the University of South Carolina and an expert on the law of driverless vehicles, told TechRepublic. It may have the processing power, speed, and reliability needed for more sophisticated automated driving, but it is not in and of itself an automated driving system, he added.

  • Two men sentenced for violating Minnesota's revenge-porn law

    Date published: 
    October 9, 2017

    "“The past two years have seen some real strides,” said Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and the author of the book, “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace.”

    Citron noted that Google and Bing now agree to keep “nonconsensual pornography” out of name searches, and Twitter, Facebook, Microsoft and Reddit ban the practice. “This allows victims to report content as abuse and if reports are legitimate (and not an anti-porn group) it will be removed,” she said via e-mail."

  • Russian Facebook ads showed a black woman firing a rifle, amid efforts to stoke racial strife

    Date published: 
    October 3, 2017

    "“These ads are racist propaganda, pure and simple,” said Malkia Cyril, a Black Lives Matter activist in Oakland, Calif., and executive director for the nonprofit Center for Media Justice. “Whether they appear to be in support or in opposition to black civil rights is irrelevant. Their aim is to subvert democracy for everyone by using anti-black stereotypes — an idea as old as America.”"

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