Press

CIS in the news.

  • Sensor tracks who is driving in your neighbourhood

    Date published: 
    August 22, 2017

    "“One of the great weaknesses in US privacy law is that we only protect against intrusions into private areas, not public spaces,” said Albert Gidari, director of privacy at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society.

    "Public roads through neighbourhoods, licence plates, pedestrians on public sidewalks etc all are fair game," he said."

  • Why the alt-right can’t build an alt-internet

    Date published: 
    August 21, 2017

    "Registrars need to be established companies that can demonstrate technical capability and financial stability. If they want to offer recognized domains extensions, they have to work with companies like Verisign, which controls the coveted .com TLD. Establishing a registry for a new TLD, meanwhile, is pretty much a non-starter right now: the last application period was in 2012, when applicants paid $185,000 just to be evaluated. The next application period is tentatively slated for 2020.

  • Hate on the Web: Does banning neo-Nazi websites raise free-speech issues for the rest of us?

    Date published: 
    August 18, 2017

    "“This part of the Charlottesville story makes people think about who controls speech on the Internet,” says Daphne Keller of Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. “We don’t have 1st Amendment rights to stop private companies from shutting down our speech, and most of the Internet is run by private companies. Most of us want some intermediaries to play that role — when we go on Twitter, we don’t want to be barraged with obscenities and on Facebook we don’t want to see racism.

  • Discord, Gab, Hatreon: how the US extreme right is organized. on the Internet to distribute neo-Nazi materials and circumvent the Silicon Valley blockade

    Date published: 
    August 18, 2017

    "For Morgan Weiland, PhD candidate and junior associate researcher at the Center for Internet & Society at Stanford Law School, the discussion is very complicated and she does not see a solution in the short or medium term.

    "The risk of closing pages or removing content from white supremacists is what happens tomorrow, someone can do the same with a page from the Black Lives Matter movement ," Weiland says in an interview with BBC World.

    "Where you put the limit, how you avoid falling into censorship ... are very delicate issues,""

  • It’s Official: President Elevates U.S. Cyber Command

    Date published: 
    August 18, 2017

    "The move really doesn’t come as a surprise, says Richard Forno, director of the Graduate Cybersecurity Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and assistant director of its Center for Cybersecurity. Former President Barack Obama approved the move before leaving office, but it took a while for President Trump to make it official, Forno points out.

  • Facebook, Airbnb Go on Offense Against Nazis After Violence

    Date published: 
    August 17, 2017

    "That doesn’t mean these companies aren’t feeling the pressure from advertisers and users who fear that pages belonging to alt-right publications like the Daily Stormer could incite violence, said Daphne Keller, Director of Intermediary Liability at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society.

  • When Government Rules by Software, Citizens Are Left in the Dark

    Date published: 
    August 17, 2017

    "Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland, says that pressure from state attorneys general, court cases, and even legislation will be necessary to change how local governments think about, and use, such algorithms. “Part of it has to come from law,” she says. “Ethics and best practices never gets us over the line because the incentives just aren’t there.”"

  • Canada approves first cryptocurrency sale in property rights shake-up

    Date published: 
    August 16, 2017

    "Following the growth of bitcoin, the most well known cryptocurrency, there are now more than 1,000 similar digital currencies being traded over the internet, said Arvind Narayanan, a computer science professor at Princeton University in the United States.

    Most of these new digital offerings, however, are used for speculation - investors hoping the currency will gain popularity and then rise in value - rather than buying and selling tangible goods and services, Narayanan said.

  • Tech Firms Break From Hands-Off Approach With Bans on White Supremacists

    Date published: 
    August 16, 2017

    ""The number of net intermediaries acting as gatekeepers has increased," since GoDaddy booted Daily Stormer, said Daphne Keller, who studies platforms' legal responsibilities at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. "Suddenly the domain registrars are sitting in judgment on content and speech," joining the usual players around free speech such as Google, Facebook and Twitter."

  • If an AI creates a work of art, who owns the rights to it?

    Date published: 
    August 15, 2017

    "As it stands, AIs in the US cannot be awarded copyright for something they have created. The current policy of the US Copyright Office is to reject claims made for works not authored by humans, but the policy is poorly codified. According to Annemarie Bridy, a professor of law at the University of Idaho and an affiliate scholar at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society, there’s no actual requirement for human authorship in the US Copyright Act. Nevertheless, the “courts have always assumed that authorship is a human phenomenon,” she says."

  • Charlottesville is reshaping the fight against online hate

    Date published: 
    August 15, 2017

    "At the same time, many anti-racism groups see free speech arguments as a distraction. The Oakland-based Center for Media Justice applauded GoDaddy’s decision to drop the site, citing the extreme nature of the Charlottesville killing. “For me, this isn't about speech at all — it's about the violent actions that led to the death of a young woman,” said director Malkia Cyril. “Cutting off sponsorship of violent white supremacy isn't corporate censorship. It's a positive assertion of values and a clear rebuke of domestic terrorism.”"

  • Did the Department of Justice Request Detailed Information About All Visitors to an Anti-Trump Website?

    Date published: 
    August 15, 2017

    "Albert Gidari, Director of Privacy for the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, told us he agrees with the EFF’s argument:

    Asking for metadata on everyone that visits a particular website implicates more than just the particularity required by the 4th Amendment. It implicates the 1st Amendment rights of anyone that visited the site.

  • Should web-hosting companies restrict who's on their platforms?

    Date published: 
    August 14, 2017

    ""Legally, they don't have any responsibility around this, unless it's a federal crime [such as child pornography] or intellectual property," Daphne Keller, the director of intermediary liability at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, told CNN Tech."

  • More U.S. companies push back on foreign must-store-data-here rule

    Date published: 
    August 12, 2017

    "“Part of what made the Internet always great and the reason why it’s blossomed is because it was always decentralized and not subject to heavy-handed regulations,” says Omer Tene, vice president of research and education at International Association of Privacy Professionals. "The concern is that the Internet will be splintered into islands.”"

  • ‘Smart Cities’ of the Future Will Require More than Big Data

    Date published: 
    August 11, 2017

    "Embedding sensors into public infrastructure without centralizing and securing the data doesn’t make a city smart or sensible. If anything, it creates more privacy concerns and security risks. “This is kind of like giving everyone an ice cream,” said Albert Gidari, Director of Privacy at Stanford’s Center for Internet & Law. “Before you know it, what sounded like something for the greater good that we all liked, is killing us,” Gidari said."

  • Hacking in Hollywood: Why the Industry Needs to Shore Up Security

    Date published: 
    August 11, 2017

    "When it comes to fighting cyber crimes in Hollywood, it’s a case of pay now or pay later. Matwyshyn said the entertainment industry is a prime target for hackers because the stakes are high, and those who work in the industry may not be paying close attention to internet security practices. It’s relatively easy to send a “phishing” email to a studio executive, advising them to click on a link. And just like that, hackers are in.

  • Can Government Keep Up with Artificial Intelligence?

    Date published: 
    August 10, 2017

    "“There is no possible way to have some omnibus AI law,” says Ryan Calo, a professor of law and co-director of the Tech Policy Lab at the University of Washington. “But rather we want to look at the ways in which human experience is being reshaped and start to ask what law and policy assumptions are broken.”"

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