Press

CIS in the news.

  • Western governments enter uncharted territory as they grapple with problem of harmful content on social media

    Date published: 
    April 15, 2019

    "“When lawmakers create new rules that have never been tested by courts – like Australia's new law or the rules proposed in the UK's White Paper – and then tell platforms to enforce them, we can only expect that a broad swathe of perfectly legal speech is going to disappear,” said Daphne Keller, director of intermediary liability at the Stanford Centre for Internet and Society. 

  • How to slow Google Sensorvault from tracking your location on iOS, Android

    Date published: 
    April 15, 2019

    ""Google maintains that such location-tracking features are intended to improve your experience. But that notion is at odds with the definition of "off," said Princeton computer scientist Jonathan Mayer. "If you're going to allow users to turn off something called 'Location History,' then all the places where you maintain location history should be turned off," he said."

  • An anonymous Instagram account that aimed to take down the advertising world’s sexual harassers may soon be unmasked

    Date published: 
    April 14, 2019

    "“People say things online and think they’re largely hidden from discovery,” said Albert Gidari, consulting director of privacy at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School. But in many cases those individuals can be identified, he said.

    “If you’re really smart and you want to defame somebody, you go to Starbucks, where it’s an open or public WiFi,” Gidari said."

     

  • Tracking Phones, Google Is a Dragnet for the Police

    Date published: 
    April 13, 2019

    "“Normally we think of the judiciary as being the overseer, but as the technology has gotten more complex, courts have had a harder and harder time playing that role,” said Jennifer Granick, surveillance and cybersecurity counsel at the American Civil Liberties Union. “We’re depending on companies to be the intermediary between people and the government.”"

  • Hackers tricked a Tesla, and it's a sign of things to come in the race to fool artificial intelligence

    Date published: 
    April 13, 2019

    "Ryan Calo, co-director of the University of Washington's Tech Policy Lab, recently published a paper asking this question: "Is tricking a robot hacking?"

    Unlike the traditional understanding of hacking — entering a system, stealing information or changing its code — this threat includes prompting an AI system to make what Mr Calo called "errors of consequence".

  • The Cybersecurity 202: Security experts irked U.S. prosecutors used anti-hacking law to nab Julian Assange

    Date published: 
    April 12, 2019

    "“CFAA is a ridiculously broad statute or, at least it has been interpreted that way by many courts,” Jeffrey Vagle, an affiliate scholar at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society, told me. “It was written in a completely different era with respect to how we use computers. It was not a well-thought-out law, and that’s come back to haunt us.”"

  • Breaking Down the Hacking Case Against Julian Assange

    Date published: 
    April 11, 2019

    "Is one failed attempt to crack a password really enough to embroil Assange in a felony hacking case? "For the CFAA, unfortunately yes," says Jeffrey Vagle, a former University of Pennsylvania law professor and current affiliate scholar at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. He points to a long history of using the overly expansive wording of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act to hit hackers accused of even trivial acts with serious charges. "The fact that his involvement is de minimus isn't enough to stop an indictment, because the CFAA is just so broad.""

  • Net Neutrality Battles Heat Up in Congress and Beyond

    Date published: 
    April 10, 2019

    "Oral arguments before the three-judge panel were heard early this year, and a decision is expected in late spring or early summer. "The court could reinstate the 2015 protections in full, uphold the FCC's repeal, or rule more narrowly on parts of the repeal," says Ryan Singel, a fellow at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society. "Additionally, the court may decide whether the FCC decision would pre-empt any state laws on net neutrality.""

  • Dems Say Net Neutrality Bill Would Throttle 'Unjust' Practices

    Date published: 
    April 9, 2019

    "But Ryan Singel, a media and strategy fellow at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, characterized the repeal of net neutrality protections as a far more extreme measure.

    “For the first time ever the FCC said we do not have jurisdiction to step in and police ISPs from what happens on the internet,” Singel told Law360 Tuesday. “I would say the 2017 order does not get us anywhere close to where we were before 2015.”"
  • Experts, club members disagree on how to secure Mar-a-Lago

    Date published: 
    April 5, 2019

    "“I certainly doubt that patrons and also the president would endorse that level of security, given that it’s a commercial interest of his,” said Richard Forno, assistant director of the University of Maryland-Baltimore County’s Center for Cybersecurity and director of the Cybersecurity Graduate Program.

    Forno said the incident isn’t so much an issue of cybersecurity, as it is a physical security issue.

  • Details Still Few In City Of Albany’s Ransomware Attack

    Date published: 
    April 5, 2019

    "Brian Nussbaum is assistant professor at the College of Emergency Preparedness Homeland Security and Cybersecurity at the University at Albany.   "Ransomware is a very tough problem, because by the time you're infected there's very little you can do about it, so you really are facing the question of paying the ransom or not paying the ransom.""

  • Prosecutors Dropping Child Porn Charges After Software Tools Are Questioned

    Date published: 
    April 3, 2019

    "“Courts and police are increasingly using software to make decisions in the criminal justice system about bail, sentencing, and probability-matching for DNA and other forensic tests,” said Jennifer Granick, a surveillance and cybersecurity lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech, Privacy and Technology Project who has studied the issue.

  • Ransomware Hits City Of Albany Computers

    Date published: 
    April 1, 2019

    "Brian Nussbaum is an assistant professor at the College of Emergency Preparedness Homeland Security and Cybersecurity at the University at Albany.   "Typically, when people talk about ransomware, they're talking about something called crypto-ransomware, and what crypto-ransomware is, is it uses very, very strong cryptography to lock up your file and the ransom is an amount of money paid by the victim, typically in Bitcoin or another cryptocurrency, to get a key to unlock their files.""

  • The privacy paradox

    Date published: 
    April 1, 2019

    ""Some of these companies have so much power that we don't have much choice but to use their services — and we can't use these services without giving something up," said Jennifer King, director of privacy at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society.

  • Americans Still Don't Trust Self-Driving Cars, Reuters/Ipsos Poll Finds

    Date published: 
    April 1, 2019

    "Self-driving expert Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina, said a number of companies “don’t actually want to sell people these cars — they want to rent us these services. They want us to pay every month, every trip.” 

    For many Americans, “$2,000 is a lot of money,” he said. “If you’d asked people if they’d pay $15,000 for an advanced safety package or even $10,000 for a luxury trim package, the answer in a lot of cases is going to be no.”"

     

  • Care.com Removes Tens of Thousands of Unverified Listings

    Date published: 
    March 31, 2019

    "The issue highlights the pressure on many internet platforms to attract customers by presenting a critical mass of listings to demonstrate scale, says Daphne Keller, director of intermediary liability at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. She added that inactive or false listings don’t produce a good customer experience either. “You don’t want to have a bunch of listings in there that turn out to be dead ends,” Ms. Keller said. A Care.com spokeswoman declined to comment on Ms. Keller’s assessment."

  • Cute robots, smart underwear, and facial recognition in church: Have we gone too far?

    Date published: 
    March 28, 2019

    "In the near future, robots might be able to manipulate our emotions, everyone will be rated on everything, and we won’t be able to trust our own eyes, Woodrow Hartzog said.

    “I promise I will end on a positive note,” the Northeastern professor said Thursday, eliciting chuckles from a roomful of people gathered at the university’s Charlotte campus to hear him discuss online privacy.

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