Press

CIS in the news.

  • What's Next: Max Schrems and Why Your Privacy Policy Still Doesn't Cut It

    Date published: 
    May 30, 2018

    "akeaway: Public data, of course, is already public. But now providers have an obligation to package it up and ship it over to defense counsel, notes Riana Pfefferkorn of Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. “Providers are now on notice that they’re presumably going to get a lot more of these types of subpoenas.”"

  • California’s State Senate Is About to Vote on SB 822 — the Strongest State Net Neutrality Law Yet

    Date published: 
    May 29, 2018

    "The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has called SB 822 the ‘gold standard’ of net neutrality bills.

    That’s because it’s specifically crafted to challenge the federal government’s authority to enact net neutrality laws.  Noted contributors include Barbara van Schewick, a Stanford Law School professor, and the team of lawyers at EFF.  Both groups have built upon the laws passed by both Washington State and Oregon, with an eye towards creating a fierce legal challenge to the FCC."

  • How hackers can exploit devices used at home

    Date published: 
    May 28, 2018

    "“The more we delegate, the more there is opportunity for hackers that make it a valuable target,” said Jennifer King, director of consumer privacy at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society.

    “The second you use some software to link everything to your house to some online account to something else, then it becomes valuable — in ways we don’t necessarily see, but hackers can definitely find those connections and try to figure out a way to exploit it," King said."

  • Ransomware attacks such as at South Bend's Allied Physicians are becoming common

    Date published: 
    May 26, 2018

    "“It would be hard to prove that records haven’t been made,” said Scott Shackelford, a cybersecurity expert and associate professor of business law and ethics at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business.

    SamSam works by gaining access to a computer system and encrypting all of the data so that it is useless unless a ransom is paid. Once that happens — generally with Bitcoin or some other type of cryptocurrency — thieves provide a key to unlock the data.

  • Most U.S. Adults in Poll Unwilling to Share Personal Data for Ads to Keep a Service Free

    Date published: 
    May 25, 2018

    "As Jennifer King, director of consumer privacy at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society, points out, timing is everything.

    She said it is “an incredible coincidence” that the news about the Cambridge Analytica breach came out around the same time that GDPR was getting ready to be implemented “because it has shone the light on the threat third-party data collectors pose in the ecosystem,” she said Monday by phone.

  • Amazon Echo sent family's private conversation to another user

    Date published: 
    May 25, 2018

    "Ryan Calo, a law professor who co-directs the University of Washington's tech policy lab, said while there are upsides to these technologies, there are also downsides to be considered. One of those risks, he said, is normalizing a feeling that a person is never alone, even in their own home.

  • GDPR Oddsmakers: Who, Where, When Will Enforcement Hit First?

    Date published: 
    May 25, 2018

    "There are probably as many answers to those question as there are supervisory authorities (SAs), and there are many, notes Omer Tene, vice president and chief knowledge officer of the International Association of Privacy Professionals. Tene points out that there are 28 different EU member states, and not only might they have individual federal authorities, but they may also have a dozen more for individual states - similar to the US system. Different authorities have different priorities and different "appetites" for litigation or punitive action, he says."

  • G.D.P.R., a New Privacy Law, Makes Europe World’s Leading Tech Watchdog

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2018

    "Even if Europe persuades other countries to adopt its policies, it will be hard to ensure the laws work, said Omer Tene, a vice president at the International Association of Privacy Professionals, a trade group that tracks global privacy regulation.

    “It’s one thing to have rules on the books,” said Mr. Tene. “It’s quite another thing to implement these rules on the ground.”"

  • Will the EU’s GDPR Rules Launch a New Era of Data Protection?

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2018

    "“[GDPR] hinges on a robust notion of explaining what exactly goes on with [people’s] information,” said Andrea Matwyshyn, a professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University, as well as an affiliate scholar at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School. The GDPR replaces the EU’s Data Protection Directive that was implemented in 1998, and it “will nudge companies” to reconsider the way they have been presenting their processing of data to consumers in the last 20 years, she added."

  • California's Heavy-Handed Plan to Regulate the Self-Driving Car Biz

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2018

    "“The transportation network company experience has shaped everyone’s view of how to approach these things,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a lawyer who studies driverless vehicle regulations at the University of South Carolina School of Law. That was the classic horse-is-gone, close-the-barn-door maneuver, and this is an opportunity to start afresh. “If you’re going to open the barn door, make sure the horse is still in there and then open it a bit at a time.”"

  • This Is How Alexa Can Record Private Conversations

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2018

    "People have been willing to overlook glitches in the Echo, like it turning on accidentally or without the wake word being uttered, said Ryan Calo, an associate law professor at the University of Washington who researches how law applies to technology. This incident is more alarming since a private conversation was recorded and sent to a third party, he said.

    "Think about how uncomfortable the millions of people who own these things now feel," Calo said. "The real harm is the invasion into solitude people now experience in their homes.""

  • Uber Self-Driving Car in Crash Wasn't Programmed to Brake

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2018

    ""That seems like a serious design omission," Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina’s School of Law, who studies autonomous vehicle regulations. "I can understand disabling Volvo’s systems, but it sounds like a lot of tasks were placed on a single safety driver."

    It’s further evidence that people just don’t experience driverless cars as being their responsibility even when they’ve been told that it is, even when the system relies on them," said Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington."
  • What Is GDPR and Why Should You Care?

    Date published: 
    May 24, 2018

    ""Some companies may realize it’s better to just extend GDPR protections to all their customers, period, rather than one one policy for European citizens and one policy for the rest of the world," says Richard Forno, a cyber security researcher and the Assistant Director of UMBC's Center for Cybersecurity. "

  • Trump Can't Block Critics on Twitter. What This Means For You

    Date published: 
    May 23, 2018

    "Neil Richards, a law professor at Washington University School of law, says the case is particularly important because it seeks to assess how the internet actually works in the real world. "When we’re thinking about the First Amendment, it’s important that we recognize the internet that we have in practice, rather than an idealized version of the internet that we might want to have or that Silicon Valley might sell us," he says."

  • We know you're not reading all those new terms of service emails. You might want to.

    Date published: 
    May 22, 2018

    "Northeastern professor Woodrow Hartzog, whose new book, Privacy’s Blueprint, published last month, calls the law a “watershed moment,” saying it’s built on the notion that privacy is a fundamental right. He said that while the law applies directly to Europeans, companies that have customers all over the world—like Facebook, Google, Twitter and many of your favorite apps—are updating their terms for everyone, including Americans.

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