Press

CIS in the news.

  • Body camera maker will let cops live-stream their encounters

    Date published: 
    October 8, 2018

    "Harlan Yu, the executive director of Upturn, a Washington nonprofit consultancy that has studied body cameras, says that live-streaming could erode community trust and help enable more controversial technologies down the road.

    “The capability to livestream all BWC footage back to a department- or precinct-wide command center… will further entrench body-worn cameras as tools for police surveillance of communities, rather than tools for transparency,” he wrote in an email."

     

  • Banks shooting pulls MPD into national fray over reliability, proper use of bodycams

    Date published: 
    October 8, 2018

    "Are officers deliberately neglecting their cameras – even shutting them off – to undermine the transparency promised by expensive investments in body cameras and in-car video systems?

    And are supervisors letting them get away with it?

    “We are seeing this happen over and over,’’ says Harlan Yu, executive director of Upturn, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that studies the role of police technology in protecting civil rights."

  • The DOT Says ‘Drivers’ Don’t Have to Be Human

    Date published: 
    October 4, 2018

    "“These rulemakings could matter a lot, and the devil will be in the details,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law who studies automated vehicle policy. In other words: A lot might be about to change in the world of vehicle regulation. We just don’t know what yet."

  • Trump administration pushing to ease roll-out of driverless cars and trucks

    Date published: 
    October 4, 2018

    "“There’s wariness about the federal government’s regulatory commitment [and] willingness to police the companies,” said Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina and a driverless policy expert. “Even more than the distrust in the technology, it’s distrust in the companies . . . And it’s even a distrust in the administrative ability of government to regulate, to act as a check.""

  • Experts say USMCA frees Canadian data — with unknown risks

    Date published: 
    October 4, 2018

    "“I think, realistically, if you’re looking at superpower intelligence agencies, they would be able to access the data regardless of whether it’s stored in a server in Toronto or in Chicago,” said Omer Tene, vice president of the U.S.-based International Association of Privacy Professionals. “There’s very close collaboration between intelligence agencies, and they can overcome bigger technological obstacles than [the border].”"

  • California tests limits of state power, from internet to boardrooms

    Date published: 
    October 2, 2018

    "But Stanford law Professor Barbara van Schewick said that because the FCC disavowed its power to regulate internet service providers’ behavior in the December order, it cannot turn around and say states can’t regulate them either.

    “If the FCC doesn’t have authority to adopt net neutrality rules, then it can’t prevent the states from adopting their own net neutrality rules,” van Schewick said."

  • California’s net neutrality rules face legal test

    Date published: 
    October 1, 2018

    "“I think the California bill is on strong legal ground,” said Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick.

    In removing the 2015 net neutrality rules, she pointed out, the Federal Communications Commission said it should not have the power to impose such restrictions on internet service providers.

    “If the FCC doesn’t have authority to adopt net neutrality rules then it can’t prevent the states from adopting their own net neutrality rules,” van Schewick said.

  • The Federal Government and California Are Officially at War Over Net Neutrality

    Date published: 
    October 1, 2018

    "Barbara van Schewick, a professor at Stanford Law School and the director of the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford, says that California’s new net neutrality law is on firm legal footing. “An agency that has no power to regulate has no power to preempt the states, according to case law,” van Schewick said in a statement Sunday.* “When the FCC repealed the 2015 Open Internet Order, it said it had no power to regulate broadband internet access providers.

  • California just passed its net neutrality law. The DOJ is already suing

    Date published: 
    September 30, 2018

    "Barbara van Schewick, a professor at Stanford Law School, says the California bill is on solid legal ground and that California is within its legal rights.

    "An agency that has no power to regulate has no power to preempt the states, according to case law. When the FCC repealed the 2015 Open Internet Order, it said it had no power to regulate broadband internet access providers. That means the FCC cannot prevent the states from adopting net neutrality protections because the FCC's repeal order removed its authority to adopt such protections," said van Schewick."

  • During Senate Hearing, Tech Companies Push for Lax Federal Privacy Rules

    Date published: 
    September 26, 2018

    "Tech companies are rushing to get a seat at the table for a federal data privacy framework that could have major implications for their businesses. The push for regulation is a reversal from tech companies’ longtime approach to resist regulation, and is an effort to preempt the strict California Consumer Privacy Act, said Omer Tene, the vice president and chief knowledge officer of the nonpartisan International Association of Privacy Professionals.

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