Press

CIS in the news.

  • Two Senators Call for Investigation of Smart TV Industry

    Date published: 
    July 12, 2018

    "“In terms of practical things the F.T.C. could do, one is filing additional enforcement actions, which, in addition to curtailing individual companies’ practices, can send a powerful ‘clean up your act’ message to industries,” said Jonathan Mayer, an assistant professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University and a former technology adviser at the Federal Communications Commission."

  • El Chapo's Lawyers want to Suppress Evidence from Spyware Used to Catch Cheating Spouses

    Date published: 
    July 11, 2018

    "Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography fellow at the Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, said FlexiSPY is “kind of an app version of a wire.” Wiretaps are the traditional monitoring tool used by law enforcement after obtaining a warrant signed by a judge.

    “It can be done quickly, but it’s not something that can be done remotely,” Pfefferkorn said. “That raises the question for me of whether this was a U.S. law enforcement agency that installed this on Chapo’s phone, if it was his phone.”"

  • Uber axes 100 ‘operator’ positions in self-driving cars

    Date published: 
    July 11, 2018

    "Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor at the University of South Carolina’s law school, who writes regularly about autonomous driving, said Uber’s training of drivers had to strike a tricky balance. “Give a driver too little to do, and they’ll get complacent. Give them too much to do, and they’ll get overwhelmed,” he said. “It’s possible that Uber’s trying to find the sweet spot between the two.

  • The Cybersecurity 202: Privacy advocates blast Kavanaugh for government surveillance support

    Date published: 
    July 11, 2018

    "Kavanaugh could be a “potential vote for retrenchment on privacy and the Fourth Amendment,” said Albert Gidari, director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. As Kavanaugh moves through the confirmation process, he added, “I don't think there will be any surprises, as his unabashed view that national security trumps privacy is pretty clearly articulated in Klayman.”

    “In short,” Gidari said, “the privacy community isn't having cocktails over this one.”"

  • Criminal case sheds light on Apple self-driving car technology

    Date published: 
    July 10, 2018

    "The technical detail in the complaint "would only have been possible if Apple complied" with investigators, said Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant professor of law at the University of South Carolina who has studied issues around autonomous vehicles. Given the fact that even more technical details could come out at trial, "that's striking in its own right" and shows the importance Apple places on protecting its technology, he said."

  • Why California’s new consumer privacy law won’t be GDPR 2.0

    Date published: 
    July 9, 2018

    "“For the major online platforms, I think this law will have very little impact,” said Jonathan Mayer, assistant professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University and former chief technologist of the Federal Communications Commission."

  • The Cybersecurity 202: Spyware theft case offers a cautionary tale for encryption debate

    Date published: 
    July 6, 2018

    "“There's nothing preventing an Apple employee from doing the exact same thing in a world where there's mandatory key escrow for exceptional access to smartphones,” said Riana Pfefferkorn, a cryptography fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. “Once the deed is done by an insider, then what was supposed to be a tool only for the ‘good guys’ is out there for the ‘bad guys’ as well.”"

  • Having more control over your data doesn't mean it's safe

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2018

    "Working out those details is important, because many companies that collect personal data continue making "fundamental mistakes" in how they protect it, said Richard Forno, assistant director of the UMBC Center for Cybersecurity.

    "In 2018, we should not be seeing these types of incidents and breaches," he said.

  • Smart TVs are spying on you through your phone

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2018

    ""It looks like it will put some restrictions on the sale of personal information, but there doesn't seem to be anything there limiting the collection of any kind," said Jennifer King, director of consumer privacy at the Center for Internet and Society at the Stanford Law School. "In some ways, we're still in the status quo with a little more power that our data not be sold.""

  • Outsmarted by a Smart TV? Not This Reporter.

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2018

    "The experience illustrated how difficult it is to discover how companies may be tracking people on their televisions, which many advertisers see as the final frontier of consumer data. “When you’re thinking about buying a TV, you’re thinking about the resolution, the color depth, you think about the price,” said Jonathan Mayer, an assistant professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University and a former technology adviser at the Federal Communications Commission.

  • Facebook Found “Hate Speech” in the Declaration of Independence

    Date published: 
    July 5, 2018

    "Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland who works with Facebook’s non-consensual intimate images advisory group in an unpaid capacity, says that the episode could point to the limits of algorithms in flagging hate speech. Hate speech is about context, she says, which algorithms struggle to detect.

  • Facebook, Cambridge probe widens

    Date published: 
    July 3, 2018

    "Aleecia McDonald, an assistant professor at Carnegie Mellon University, said in an interview that it’s “a typical path for California to pass privacy laws that are passed by other states.” “It’s a great place to experiment,” she added."

  • Is Facebook a publisher? In public it says no, but in court it says yes

    Date published: 
    July 3, 2018

    "Daphne Keller, of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, said Section 230 was designed to allow platforms like Facebook to do some moderation and make editorial decisions without generally being liable for users’ posts: “They need to be able to make discretionary choices about content.”

    The law seemed to be on Facebook’s side, she said, but added that it was an unusual case given the focus on app data access while previous cases have centered on more straightforward censorship claims."

  • Lyft to acquire Ford GoBike, follows Uber’s footsteps

    Date published: 
    July 2, 2018

    "Lyft’s acquisition of Motivate is merely one more step in the ride-hailing industry’s march toward increased dominance in the shared-vehicle market, whether that’s bikes or cars, said Bryant Walker Smith, an affiliate scholar at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. In part, that’s a response to the changing nature of city living and the increasing desire from customers to have more choice and flexibility in the way they move around, he said.

  • Foreign spying comes under new scrutiny from lawmakers

    Date published: 
    July 1, 2018

    "“The federal government is the largest consumer of commercial wireless services and is susceptible to the same cybersecurity risks in our communications infrastructure,” Jonathan Mayer, a computer science professor at Princeton University, told the panel.

    “A foreign intelligence service could easily use cell-site simulators to collect highly confidential information about government operations, deliberations and personnel movements,” Mayer added."

  • Instagram Account That Sought Harassment Tales May Be Unmasked

    Date published: 
    July 1, 2018

    "The Diet Madison Avenue suit, filed in Los Angeles, named the account and a string of Jane and John Does, representing dozens of people it believed were associated with the account. Their identities could be revealed if Instagram is subpoenaed and ordered to turn over subscriber information. The court could grant the subpoena depending on how it interprets Mr. Watson’s defamation claim, said Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and the author of the book “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace.”

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