Press

CIS in the news.

  • California Wants to Make Your Robocar Dreams Come True

    Date published: 
    October 11, 2017

    "Congress may finally be hacking away at national legislation that would firmly delineate who is responsible for regulating what about autonomous cars, but California has a big role to play here. “California is special,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a legal scholar with the University of South Carolina School of Law who studies self-driving vehicles.

  • This is why tech companies won’t disclose content of Russian ads

    Date published: 
    October 11, 2017

    "“I've worked with this statute for 20 years and I learn something new every time I look at it,” Albert Gidari, the Director of Privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society who has previously represented Google and Facebook on ECPA issues. “It's exceedingly complex.”"

  • NVIDIA AI platform promises fully autonomous taxis by 2018: Is it possible?

    Date published: 
    October 10, 2017

    "However, it's important to remember that this is a processing platform, Bryant Walker Smith, an assistant law professor at the University of South Carolina and an expert on the law of driverless vehicles, told TechRepublic. It may have the processing power, speed, and reliability needed for more sophisticated automated driving, but it is not in and of itself an automated driving system, he added.

  • Two men sentenced for violating Minnesota's revenge-porn law

    Date published: 
    October 9, 2017

    "“The past two years have seen some real strides,” said Danielle Citron, a law professor at the University of Maryland and the author of the book, “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace.”

    Citron noted that Google and Bing now agree to keep “nonconsensual pornography” out of name searches, and Twitter, Facebook, Microsoft and Reddit ban the practice. “This allows victims to report content as abuse and if reports are legitimate (and not an anti-porn group) it will be removed,” she said via e-mail."

  • Russian Facebook ads showed a black woman firing a rifle, amid efforts to stoke racial strife

    Date published: 
    October 3, 2017

    "“These ads are racist propaganda, pure and simple,” said Malkia Cyril, a Black Lives Matter activist in Oakland, Calif., and executive director for the nonprofit Center for Media Justice. “Whether they appear to be in support or in opposition to black civil rights is irrelevant. Their aim is to subvert democracy for everyone by using anti-black stereotypes — an idea as old as America.”"

  • EFF: Stupid patents are dragging down AI and machine learning

    Date published: 
    October 1, 2017

    "Just as the US Patent Office problematically gave out patents in the past for computers doing simple things like counting votes or counting calories, the office seems prepared to give out patents on "using machine learning in obvious and expected ways." Companies like Google and Microsoft are seeking to acquire, and in some cases have acquired, patents on "fundamental machine-learning techniques," Nazer writes."

  • American Policing Goes to the Supreme Court

    Date published: 
    October 1, 2017

    "But technology has slightly changed since then. Elizabeth Joh, a University of California, Davis, law professor who studies policing and surveillance, told me most people don’t realize the data they create when using everyday devices could someday be used against them by law enforcement. In fact, they probably don’t know much about their data at all. “Number one, we’re not really aware most of the time how much information we’re providing to these third parties,” Joh said.

  • Divisive words distract from reasons NFL players began protests

    Date published: 
    October 1, 2017

    "We have to admit the truth,” said Malkia Cyril, executive director of the Center for Media Justice, a racial justice organization in Oakland. “We can’t continue to tell the lie, and so we have to say that black life is not valued in this country, that black people are killed at the hands of white officers. If we don’t deal with those facts — and just feelings (about the issue) — we cannot move along."

  • Google warns that govt is demanding more of your private data than ever

    Date published: 
    September 29, 2017

    ""Providing a pathway for such countries to obtain electronic evidence directly from service providers in other jurisdictions will remove incentives for the unilateral, extraterritorial assertion of a country's laws, data localization proposals, aggressive expansion of government access authorities, and dangerous investigative techniques," wrote Richard Salgado, Google's director of Law Enforcement and Information Security.

    "These measures ultimately weaken privacy, due process, and human rights standards.""

  • Behind Ikea’s purchase of Taskrabbit, Amazon looms

    Date published: 
    September 28, 2017

    "“Ikea’s reasons for purchasing TaskRabbit may go well beyond the gains of having that company in-house for purposes of delivery and assembly,” said Ryan Calo, an assistant professor at the University of Washington School of Law, who has written about the sharing economy.

    “You never know what these new marriages with tech companies are going to yield,” he added."

  • Outraged programmers forced a rare concession from Facebook on its open-source software

    Date published: 
    September 28, 2017

    "“My my personal view is that a lot of the negative reaction was a little bit overblown,” said Daniel Nazer, an attorney at the Electronic Frontier Foundation who focuses on patent reform. “I can certainly see the good arguments for why people would prefer it not to be there,” he said, “but I didn’t see it as outrageous.”"

  • Instagram rolls out comment-control, puts onus on user to filter trolls

    Date published: 
    September 27, 2017

    "Danielle Citron, a cyber-harassment expert and law professor at the University of Maryland, said the comment-control tool is similar to those used by some blogging platforms, where people can delete or block individuals who are abusive or off-topic.

    If privacy and safety folks collaborate with engineers when building a product from the ground up, features like this might be available from the get-go "rather than trying to tack on privacy and security later," Citron said."

  • California Supreme Court remands case involving license plate readers

    Date published: 
    September 27, 2017

    "Albert Gidari, director of the Privacy Center for Internet & Society at Stanford Law School, told the Northern California Record the court made the right call, but noted, “Yes, the California Supreme Court balanced the public's right to disclosure with privacy concerns. But it is ironic in another sense. If the license plate data is so sensitive, why does the government get to collect it in the first place and view it any time without legal process?”"

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