Press

CIS in the news.

  • Self-driving car dilemmas reveal that moral choices are not universal

    Date published: 
    October 24, 2018

    "Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, is sceptical that the Moral Machine survey will have any practical use. He says that the study is unrealistic because there are few instances in real life in which a vehicle would face a choice between striking two different types of people. “I might as well worry about how automated cars will deal with asteroid strikes,” Walker Smith says."

  • Global preferences for who to save in self-driving car crashes revealed

    Date published: 
    October 24, 2018

    "“What happens with autonomous vehicles may set the tone for other AI and robotics, since they’re the first to be integrated into society at scale,” Patrick Lin, director of the Ethics + Emerging Sciences Group at Cal Poly University, told The Verge. “So it’s important that the conversation is as informed as possible, since lives are literally at stake.”"

  • Engineering Supersoldiers: Boost in Lethality May Come From Within

    Date published: 
    October 24, 2018

    "In the 2013 report, “Enhanced Warfighters: Risk, Ethics, and Policy,” Cal Poly San Luis Obispo professor Patrick Lin and others raised concerns about the operational, ethical and legal implications of enhancing warfighters. “Besides the obvious issue of free and informed consent of the test subject, there may be issues about the wider effects of an enhancement. … These are open-ended questions we don’t have a policy for yet. The technology is starting to outpace the policy and it becomes increasingly difficult to legislate these things,” Lin said in an interview."

  • Survey Polls the World: Should a Self-Driving Car Save Passengers, or Kids in the Road?

    Date published: 
    October 24, 2018

    "“The core problem, I think, is going to occur many times a day in the real world, just not in a crazy crash dilemma,” says Patrick Lin, a philosophy professor at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, who specializes in the ethics of emerging technologies and was not involved with the study.

    “The big value I see in the Moral Machine experiment is that it helps to sniff out key areas of disagreement that we need to address,” Lin says. Given time to reflect, most survey respondents might well agree with the experts."
  • Is technology re-engineering humanity?

    Date published: 
    October 24, 2018

    “We become what we behold. We shape our tools and then our tools shape us.” This truism—by the media-scholar John Culkin about the work of Marshall McLuhan—is more potent than ever in the age of data and algorithms. The technology is having a profound effect on how people live and think. 

    Some of those changes are documented in “Re-Engineering Humanity” by two technology thinkers from different academic backgrounds: Brett Frischmann is a law professor at Villanova University in Pennsylvania and Evan Selinger teaches philosophy at Rochester Institute of Technology in New York.

  • Google Turns Over Identities of Bloggers on Benfica

    Date published: 
    October 23, 2018

    "Albert Gidari, consulting director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, said under current regulations Google had little option but to comply with Benfica’s subpoena. Internet companies get hundreds of thousands of similar requests, said Gidari, who spent 20 years representing some of the world’s biggest technology companies including Google. “It isn’t scalable to know what’s behind each case,” he said.

    Google already goes “one step beyond” what it is required to do by giving notice of the subpoena to users, he added."

  • The Wildly Unregulated Practice of Undercover Cops Friending People on Facebook

    Date published: 
    October 23, 2018

    "Catherine Crump, a law professor at the University of California-Berkeley, found that horrifying. “Our social media profiles contain sensitive, private information. The circumstances under which police access those profiles raise important public policy questions that should be decided in a transparent public process, not by police departments acting on their own and certainly not by individual officers make it up as they go along,” she said by email. “Police departments should have written policies explaining when they will go undercover to access our social media profiles.

  • Artificial intelligence conference explores darkside of technology with ‘threat to democracy’ conference

    Date published: 
    October 18, 2018

    "The keynote speaker was Danielle Citron, Morton and Sophia Macht Professor of Law at the University of Maryland’s Francis King Carey School of Law. Citron addressed the rise of “deep fakes,” sophisticated fake audio and video that can be easily produced by people with access to the technology.

    Citron warned the audience that the democratization of this technology could have devastating effects on the political process. She discussed the possibility of a fabricated video that incriminates or embarrasses a political candidate surfacing the night before an election.

  • We Need To Work Harder To Make Software Engineering More Ethical

    Date published: 
    October 17, 2018

    "My fellow Forbes contributor Patrick Lin has long been involved in these discussions. He's the Director of the Ethics + Emerging Sciences Group at Cal Poly and an affiliate scholar at Stanford's Center for Internet and Society. When asked about the current code conundrum, he replied that in order to make progress, two critical things are necessary:

  • As some departments loosen grip on body camera footage, Memphis police holds firm

    Date published: 
    October 16, 2018

    "Harlan Yu, executive director of UpTurn based in Washington, D.C., a group that participated in a review of MPD's body camera policy, said the individual or the next of kin should "always have access" to body camera footage before filing a police complaint.

    Yu said a review of Memphis police policies shows the agency does not have "any provisions" like that in the department's policy.

  • 'Do Not Track,' the Privacy Tool Used by Millions of People, Doesn't Do Anything

    Date published: 
    October 15, 2018

    "“Do Not Track could have succeeded only if there had been some incentive for the ad tech industry to reach a consensus with privacy advocates and other stakeholders—some reason why a failure to reach a negotiated agreement would be a worse outcome for the industry,” said Arvind Narayanan, a professor at Princeton University who was one of the technologists at the table. “Around 2011, the threat of federal legislation brought them to the negotiating table. But gradually, that threat disappeared.

  • #NetNeutrality: Turns Out 99.7 Percent of Unique FCC Comments Wanted to Keep the Internet Open

    Date published: 
    October 15, 2018

    "“Filtering Out the Bots: What Americans Actually Told the FCC about Net Neutrality Repeal” is a study completed by Ryan Singel—a Media and Strategy Fellow at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society—in which he took a “state-by-state, district-by-district look at linguistically unique comments fled to the FCC in the 2017 repeal proceedings.”

  • Shitty Media Men list: lawyer wants to expose women who contributed

    Date published: 
    October 14, 2018

    "According to Daphne Keller, a director at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford’s school of law, outing those anonymous defendants might be the only way Miltenberg can get the case heard. It’s likely that Google – which was not named in the suit – and Donegan as the document’s creator will be immunized by federal statute and could get the case dismissed, Keller said.

  • The Ick of AI That Impersonates Humans

    Date published: 
    October 11, 2018

    "It isn't just our interactions with other humans that could be affected. “I worry a lot about how we’re building this world that’s supposed to be for convenience, comfort, and speed, but in fact makes us feel like someone is always listening, whether they are or not,” says Ryan Calo, a professor of law at the University of Washington who has studied the impacts of anthropomorphic robots on society.

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