Press

CIS in the news.

  • Google's Self-Driving Cars: 300,000 Miles Logged, Not a Single Accident Under Computer Control

    Date published: 
    August 9, 2012

    This technology is still at its very early stages and 300,000 miles is not all that big of a sample. According to a "cursory" analysis by Bryant Walker Smith of Stanford Law School, "Google's cars would need to drive themselves (by themselves) more than 725,000 representative miles without incident for us to say with 99 percent confidence that they crash less frequently than conventional cars.

  • FTC Hits Google With $22.5 Million Fine Over Safari Tracking

    Date published: 
    August 9, 2012

    Rumors of the $22.5 million settlement first cropped up in June, but the issue dates back to February. At that point, a Stanford University graduate student, Jonathan Mayer, released a report that accused Google and three other ad networks of side-stepping the privacy settings on Apple's Safari browser to track usage on iPhones and Macs without permission.

  • Google Hit with Record $22.5-Million fine for Safari Tracking

    Date published: 
    August 9, 2012

    The FTC said that Google informed Safari users that since the browser blocks third-party cookies, they did not need to opt out of online tracking. Yet Google in fact placed a temporary cookie on computers, tablets and mobile devices, a privacy breach first reported by Stanford researcher Jonathan Mayer.

  • FCC confirms decision to punish Comcast, support open Internet

    Date published: 
    August 5, 2012

    Congratulations are in order to those who worked hard to promote the cause of an Open Internet. Last month I Interviewed Marvin Ammori, general counsel for the Free Press, which was one of several groups leading the charge. At the time, Kevin Martin had recommended the Federal Communication Commission vote to punish Comcast for blocking some types of Internet traffic.

  • Computer hacking for 8-year-olds

    Date published: 
    July 31, 2012

    The hacker who goes by the pseudonym CyFi won't share her real name and declines to be photographed without her signature aviator sunglasses.

    At the annual Def Con hacking conference here Friday, Gen. Keith Alexander, director of the National Security Agency and head of the U.S. Cyber Command, brought CyFi on stage during his keynote address and called her "the most important person for our future."
     
    CyFi is 11 years old.
  • Clearing The Air On Skype: Most Of What You Read Was Not Accurate, But There Are Still Reasons To Worry

    Date published: 
    July 27, 2012

     

    Hill spoke to legal expert Jennifer Granick who pointed out that just the uncertainty and threat that such legislation might come down the road at some point seemed to be leading companies to make development decisions that left open the possibility of surveillance:
     
    The mere threat of regulation is driving innovation in the direction of backdoors and surveillance compliance. And US law doesn’t require that, yet.
  • Is the government doing enough to protect us online?

    Date published: 
    July 26, 2012

    At one point, Jennifer Granick, the director of civil liberties at the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society, asked the large audience of security professionals who they trusted less, Google or the government? The majority raised their hands for Google.

  • This Is What Is Actually 'Terrifying' About Microsoft's Skype Policy

    Date published: 
    July 26, 2012

    A few days ago, my colleague Eric Jackson wrote a post on speculation that recent changes to Skype’s architecture may have made it easier for Microsoft to tap the service’s VoIP calls. The piece was hyperbolically headlined, “It’s Terrifying and Sickening that Microsoft Can Now Listen In on All My Skype Calls.” There are several problems with this piece.

  • Secret Surveillance on the Rise

    Date published: 
    July 24, 2012

    "A probable cause standard is what's required to protect Americans, and it's what's required under the Constitution," said Catherine Crump, staff attorney for the ACLU, in an earlier interview.

     

  • Publicity rights up in the air

    Date published: 
    July 23, 2012

    The current crop of cases are an important opportunity for an appellate standard, said Julie Ahrens, an attorney and associate director of the Fair Use Project at Stanford Law School. Ahrens filed an amicus brief supporting Electronic Arts in the Hart case on behalf of three nonprofit organizations, including the Digital Media Law Project, and 10 individual law professors. "We're looking for a clear, predictable rule that limits the application of publicity rights and protects free speech rights," Ahrens said.

    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 

  • Self-Driving Cars: Coming Soon to a Highway Near You

    Date published: 
    July 23, 2012

    “We have moved to cars that have millions of lines of code and advanced systems that will think about where you want to go and will change the brakes and steering to allow you to actually get there,” said Bryant Walker Smith, a legal fellow at Stanford University working on the law and policy of autonomous vehicles. “So we’re far along on the spectrum of automation.”

  • Government Needs a Trip to Startup Land

    Date published: 
    July 19, 2012

    On a Friday night in early June, eight strangers came up with an idea to help poor Americans on government assistance gain access to healthier food. They designed a website and business model to help overcome a problem referred to as urban “food deserts –– that many low-income Americans in big cities live miles from the nearest grocery store. After three days, the eight strangers, which included the two authors of this piece, pitched the company and won a little prize –– the invitation to present the solution at an international summit organized by the World Bank and the White House.

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