Press

CIS in the news.

  • Court Decision Could Lead FCC To Redefine Internet

    Date published: 
    April 9, 2010

    Professor Barbara van Schewick talks to reporter Emily Badger about FCC Internet policy and net neutrality:

    A federal appeals court in D.C. earlier this week threw up a roadblock to the Federal Communications Commission’s plans for the future of the Internet in America. The details of the case were relatively straight-forward: Comcast was caught interfering with traffic by customers using the cumbersome file-sharing application BitTorrent, flouting a 2005 FCC Internet policy stating that Web users are entitled to access the content and applications of their choice.

  • Care To Share Your Credit Card Statement?

    Date published: 
    April 8, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society talks to KALW's Martina Castro about online privacy in light of blippy.com, a site that shares financial details within a social network:

    Not that long ago, it was awkward, and even inappropriate, to share your personal business with the world. Relationship woes, resumes, credit card statements -- they were all considered "private."

  • New Web Site Created By Stanford Experts Offers Security Reviews Of App Market

    Date published: 
    April 2, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted in the LA Times on the launch of WhatApp?, a website that reviews how well web applications protect users' privacy:

    With Apple Inc.'s iPad rolling out this weekend, developers are scrambling to create new applications — or apps.

    But are they safe? That's the question a new Web site hopes to help answer.

    Internet security experts at Stanford University launched a site Friday that reviews how well certain Web and mobile applications protect users' privacy.

    ...

  • Web And Mobile Apps Come Under Review On New Stanford Site

    Date published: 
    April 2, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is interviewed by the Stanford Report on the launch of WhatApp?, a website that reviews web and mobile apps for privacy, security, and openness. Adam Gorlick filed this story:

    About to download a new application to your smartphone? Ready to play a game on Facebook that requires you to join a network? All you have to do is share a little bit of personal information, trust the systems are secure, and you're on your way.

  • 'Harry Potter Lexicon' is focus Of Copyright Law And Fair Use Seminar At GVSU

    Date published: 
    April 1, 2010

    Jule Ahrens, associate director of the Fair Use Project, is mentioned as a speaker at the Copyright Law and Fair Use for Creative Artists Workshop:

    For RDR Books Inc., Grand Rapids author Steven Vander Ark's "The Lexicon: An Unauthorized Guide to Harry Potter Fiction and Related Materials" has been the second highest selling title in the Muskegon book publisher's 16-year history.

    "It's not a blockbuster. It's a good, solid reference book," said Roger Rapoport, owner of Muskegon-based RDR Books. "It's done well. We're very happy about that."

    ...

  • Blippy.com Shares Intimate Financial Details

    Date published: 
    March 9, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, talks to Steve Inskeep of National Public Radio about online privacy in light of Blippy.com, a site that shares financial transactions within a social network:

    The Internet start-up Blippy.com keeps track of someone's spending habits online, much like Twitter keeps track of random thoughts. Users register a credit card with the site, and every transaction on that card is displayed to friends on Blippy.

    ...

    STEVE INSKEEP, host:

  • Google Earth Faces Pressure From Europeans

    Date published: 
    March 7, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, talks to KCBS radio about privacy issues associated with Google's street view images:

    Google Earth can take you to just about any place you want to go on the planet and for some that's a problem. European Union officials are demanding that Google reduce the time it stores its street view images from 12 to six months. Ryan Calo of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society says there's concern that individual privacy could be jeopardized.

  • Redrawing The Route To Online Privacy

    Date published: 
    February 28, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, discusses his research on voice and animation technologies that emulate humans to deliver warnings about privacy issues to web browsers. Steve Lohr of the New York Times reports:

    On the Internet, things get old fast. One prime candidate for the digital dustbin, it seems, is the current approach to protecting privacy on the Internet.

  • Legal Precedent To Be Set On Smartphone Searches

    Date published: 
    February 18, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, talks to Holly Quan of KCBS about whether police searching cell phones at time of arrest without obtaining a search warrant violates privacy rights:

    New ground could be broken in a San Mateo County courtroom when a judge decides whether evidence collected from the warrantless search of a suspect's smartphone is admissible. Experts say the case speaks to how the law isn't keeping up with technology.

  • Judge To Decide If Police Can Search Cell Phones

    Date published: 
    February 17, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted in the San Mateo County Times on whether police searching cell phones without a search warrant violates a person's Fourth Amendment rights:

    Attorneys for a San Francisco man are trying to set a legal precedent that would force police to obtain a search warrant before going through the cell phone of a person who has been arrested.

  • Facebook Gripes Protected By Free Speech, Ruling Says

    Date published: 
    February 16, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted on a student's constitutional right to criticize her teacher on Facebook. Rich Phillips of CNN reports:

    A former Florida high school student who was suspended by her principal after she set up a Facebook page to criticize her teacher is protected constitutionally under the First Amendment, a federal magistrate ruled.

  • Google Apologizes for Buzz Fuss, Stops Automation

    Date published: 
    February 16, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted in CIO Today about the online privacy of Google users with regards to Google's launch of Buzz, it's social-media network:

    Google's Todd Jackson has apologized for the Google Buzz fiasco in which Gmail users contacts were made public without notice. In response to user complaints, Google has further tweaked Google Buzz so matchups and sharing are no longer automatic. A security lab reported that in just two days, a Google Buzz spammer had linked to 237 people.

  • Alameda DA Clears Brown's Office In Privacy Flap

    Date published: 
    February 5, 2010

    Alameda County's district attorney announced Thursday that Attorney General Jerry Brown's office did not break privacy laws by recording phone conversations with news reporters without their consent.

    Brown's office had asked District Attorney Nancy O'Malley to conduct the independent investigation into the repeated recordings made by communications director Scott Gerber, who resigned in November after news broke about his actions.

  • Does Mr. Roboto Need A Lawyer?

    Date published: 
    January 29, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is featured in a NBC video interview on robotics and the law. He comments that robotics law should model Internet law, in that manufacturers are not responsible for content built on platforms, just as websites have immunity from content posted on the Web:

    When the day comes that robots are living alongside humans, what happens if there's a malfunction of legal proportions?

  • Software And Application Evaluator WhatApp Nears Public Release

    Date published: 
    January 28, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society (CIS), discusses WhatApp, a project initiated by CIS to assess the security and privacy of software applications:

    This spring, a project under development to help assess the security and privacy of software applications will go public. WhatApp, an online resource where experts and the public alike can rate applications based on how well-behaved they are, will help consumers to exercise their privacy rights, said its project manager.

  • Former Boyfriend Used Craigslist To Arrange Woman's Rape, Police Say

    Date published: 
    January 11, 2010

    Center for Internet Fellow Ryan Calo talked to the LA Times' DeeDee Correll about the role of Craigslist in a criminal case involving Jebidiah James Stipe, a Marine stationed at Twentynine Palms, California who is a accused of using the free online advertising service to arrange the rape of his former girlfriend:

    A Wyoming man is accused of posing online as his former girlfriend and soliciting someone to act out a violent sexual fantasy.

    ...

    The advertisement appeared on Craigslist in early December.

  • Who Will Be Legally Responsible For Our New Robot Overlords?

    Date published: 
    December 8, 2009

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted in Above the Law's blog post on robotics and legal responsibility:

    It’s almost 2010. 2010! The future is here!

    So where, pray tell, are my freaking robots? When I was a kid, I was promised robots that would clean my house and prepare my meals and submit to my sexual perversions. Yet here we are, well into the 21st century, and there is not a robot slave to be found. What a ripoff. I’m so angry I feel like going back in time and killing John Connor.

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