Press

CIS in the news.

  • Brave New World of Robot Litigants, Soldiers, Escorts

    Date published: 
    April 21, 2012

    The interrogator-bots — displayed on screens in kiosks at border checkpoints — will ask questions while flashing pictures of weapons or drugs, then decide whether the answers are truthful from data collected by sensors monitoring involuntary responses like breathing and heartbeat. The robots even have the ability to switch from good-cop to bad-cop modes depending on how a suspect responds.

  • ACLU: Wireless Carriers Enable Warrantless Cellphone Tracking

    Date published: 
    April 20, 2012

    While law enforcement organizations across the country may be tracking people using their cellphones, police are finding willing partners in wireless phone companies, an American Civil Liberties Union lawyer said on Friday.

    Many cellphone companies have created departments and even online portals to help law enforcement request location data on people, often without a warrant, ACLU attorney Catherine Crump said during a taping of C-Span's "The Communicators" on Friday.
     
    Read full story at the original publication link below. 
  • To Read All Those Web Privacy Policies, Just Take A Month Off Work

    Date published: 
    April 19, 2012

    Internet surfers have long worried that they have insufficient control over their online privacy — despite the privacy policies many people agree to when they visit websites or use online services. There are data to support the surfers' feelings: Online privacy policies are so cumbersome and onerous that it would take the average person about 250 working hours every year — about 30 full working days — to actually read the privacy policies of the websites they visit in a year, according to an analysis by researchers Aleecia M. McDonald and Lorrie Faith Cranor.

  • Y! Big Story: Tupac’s Resurrection and Questions Over Raising the Dead

    Date published: 
    April 19, 2012

    "Speaking of the law, all sorts of legal protections do come into play: copyright, right to publicity, defamation. Daniel Nazer, a fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, points out to Yahoo! that a statute in California—an entertainment hub—allows famous public figures to be reanimated for a play and other broader works, in a nod to the First Amendment."

  • What Local Cops Learn, and Carriers Earn, from Cellphone Records

    Date published: 
    April 18, 2012

    “I think that this data confirms that cellphone trapping is a routine law enforcement practice, not only for serious crimes but for more routine crimes ,” said Catherine Crump, the ACLU lawyer who ran its investigation. “It is integrated into the law enforcement’s everyday arsenal, and that makes understanding what data law enforcement uses, and making sure that this complies with the Constitution, all the more important. … This is first look we have to see how pervasive this practice is.”

    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 

  • Effect of Regulation on Technology & Innovation

    Date published: 
    April 16, 2012

    Anthony Falzone, Executive Director of the Fair Use Project, along with Larry Kramer, Mark Lemley, Richard Epstein, Peter Thiel and Ted Ullyot in the Federalist Society's panel "Effect of Regulation on Technology & Innovation.

  • Robots dazzle spectators at Stanford block party, job fair

    Date published: 
    April 16, 2012

    Ryan Calo, the director of privacy and robotics at Stanford's Center for Internet and Society, said the event has always been popular among the younger set.

    "Robots are fun," he said. "But one of the reasons we do the event, frankly, is because robots are such a good way to get kids interested in science, technology, engineering and math. And those are very much needed skills in the contemporary economy."

  • Stanford Robot Block Party Has PR2s, SPHERES, More

    Date published: 
    April 13, 2012

    If you couldn't make it to the Robot Block Party at Stanford on Wednesday, you should probably take a minute and seriously re-examine your life goals. And after you've done that, head on past the break to check out our gallery of pictures from the event, which ought to give you a fairly good idea of all the robot fun that you missed out on.

  • Copyfraud: Techdirt Book Club Selection For April, Part Two

    Date published: 
    April 11, 2012

    Anthony Falzone suggests that the defendants’ decision not to assert fair use may have been strategic: “Combs and his label can afford to pay for samples. Many aspiring artists and their fledgling labels—the next generation of would-be moguls hungry to unseat Diddy—cannot.”

  • New Creations on Display at Stanford National Robot Week Event

    Date published: 
    April 11, 2012

    Innovators and technology developers on Wednesday night were celebrating National Robot Week at Stanford University by showing off robots of the future. The event wasn't all serious tech talk. In fact, one of the big hits of the event was a dancing robot.

  • Robots Showcased At Stanford ‘Block Party'

    Date published: 
    April 11, 2012

    A "Robot Block Party" was held at Stanford on Wednesday to expose kids to the practical applications of fields such as science and technology. Mark Sayre reports.

  • Rep. Issa Discusses SOPA/PIPA

    Date published: 
    April 10, 2012

    Congressman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) engaged in a public conversation Monday evening with Anthony Falzone, director of the Fair Use Project at the Center for Internet and Society (CIS), on the broad subject of Internet freedoms and intellectual property. The event, entitled “SOPA, PIPA and Internet Freedom: Where Do We Go From Here?” was held at the Law School in front of a crowd of mostly graduate students and faculty.

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