Press

CIS in the news.

  • Stanford Students Create 'Do Not Track' Software

    Date published: 
    December 2, 2010

    Fellow Ryan Calo discusses the potential future of a new "do not track" software, which was created by a pair of Stanford researchers:

    As a government agency pushes for a "do not track" mechanism to protect online consumer privacy, a pair of Stanford researchers is developing the technology to make it work.

  • Could A Do Not Track List Become A Reality?

    Date published: 
    November 30, 2010

    Student fellow Jonathan Mayer is the featured guest on a Martketplace radio broadcast covering the Do Not Track List option now available to web users. Here is a description and link to the interview:

    The idea of a Do Not Track list for web users has been kicked around for a while. After the relative success of the Do Not Call telemarketing list, it seems like an easy and practical way for people to choose not to be tracked around the Internet by online advertisers.

  • Becoming The Microsoft Of The Robot World

    Date published: 
    November 2, 2010

    Director of the Consumer Privacy Project Ryan Calo is quoted in the following story on the highly competitive atmosphere of the robot industry. Business Week's Joel Stonington reports:

    Robots build our cars and electronics. They sort packages with ease, lift enormous weights, and perform microsurgeries too small for the human eye. In Afghanistan, robots are fighting our wars. What they can't do is share an operating system.

  • Could Europe’s Tough Privacy Protection Proposals Influence Washington, D.C.?

    Date published: 
    October 22, 2010

    Ryan Calo, director of the Consumer Privacy Project at the Center for Internet and Society, is mentioned in a Forbes article on online privacy harm:

    “Online privacy” is a hot topic across the country these days. Our spending tons of time on the Internet and revealing lots about ourselves is not a particularly new phenomenon, but it seems to have finally caught the sustained attention of lawmakers and federal regulators in Washington, D.C.

  • Robots: The Law

    Date published: 
    October 5, 2010

    Ryan Calo is a senior research fellow at Stanford Law School who has specialized in robotics and the law. In his interview with the Robots podcast he discusses liability issues in robotics: Should manufacturers, users or even robots be responsible for robots and their actions? Why does current US liability legislation hinder the robotics industry to live up to its full potential? Is there a good model for changing it? And what could trigger such a change?

  • Online Classifieds: Who Is Responsible?

    Date published: 
    September 22, 2010

    Senior research fellow Ryan Calo talks to American Public Media's Marketplace about the Communications Decency Act and website liability when it comes to user-generated content:

    The Village Voice's Backpage.com is being sued by an underage girl who was pimped out via the classifieds website. But the Communications Decency Act says that websites are protected from liability from what users post.

    ...

  • Craigslist Action On Adult Ads Is One Right Step Down A Long Road

    Date published: 
    September 11, 2010

    Professor Ryan Calo, a research fellow at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society, is quoted on the efforts of 20 attorneys general to prevent the posting of salacious ads on Craigslist:

    Craigslist wasn't forced to shut down its "adult services" section on the popular online community board, but it did last weekend. And that's worth celebrating.

    Legal experts say Craigslist could have continued offering the space, which law enforcement and victim advocacy groups blame for making it easier to find and sell underage victims of sex trafficking.

  • Craigslist Adult Ads Under Fire

    Date published: 
    August 31, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a senior research fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, talks to Michael Krasny of KQED Forum about the legality of Craigslist's adult services:

    Seventeen state attorneys general sent a letter to Craigslist last week, calling on the San Francisco-based classified ad website to shut down its "adult services" section over prostitution concerns. We take up the debate over the online ads.

    ...

    Host: Michael Krasny

  • Prelude To A Book Review: Barbara van Schewick’s Internet Architecture And Innovation

    Date published: 
    August 27, 2010

    Professor Barbara van Schewick's book, Internet Architecture and Innovation, is reviewed by Danielle Citron on Concurring Opinions:

    In the next few weeks, Concurring Opinions will be discussing various aspects of Internet policy in earnest. On September 7 and 8, we will hold an online symposium on Jonathan Zittrain’s The Future of the Internet (And How To Stop It) featuring thoughtful scholars, journalists, and (lucky for us) the author.

  • Essential new book on 'Net Policy (blessed by Lessig!): "Internet Architecture and Innovation"

    Date published: 
    August 12, 2010

    Professor Barbara van Schewick's book, Internet Architecture and Innovation, is reviewed by Xeni Jardin of Boing Boing:

    Marvin Ammori has an extensive review up on Barbara van Schewick's "Internet Architecture and Innovation," a new book on Internet policy that Ammori describes as "essential reading for anyone interested in Internet policy--and probably for anyone interested in the law, economics, technology, or start-ups."

  • Internet Policy: Most Important Book In Years is Now Out

    Date published: 
    August 11, 2010

    Professor Barbara van Schewick's book, Internet Architecture and Innovation, is reviewed by Center for Internet and Society visiting scholar, Marvin Ammori, on his website:

    There’s a new book out on Internet policy that is essential reading for anyone interested in Internet policy—and probably for anyone interested in the law, economics, technology, or start-ups. I recommend it to everyone. It’s that good.

  • Putting A Price On Privacy

    Date published: 
    July 21, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted in The International Herald Tribune on the value of personal information online. Steve Lohr reports:

    I recently wrote a column about a San Francisco start-up that is betting the time has come to make personal information online not only an asset consumers can manage but also a virtual currency that can be traded someday.

  • The Economics Of Privacy Pricing

    Date published: 
    July 19, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted on the difficulty of determining the value of personal information in the marketplace:

    I wrote a Sunday column about a San Francisco start-up that is betting the time has come to make personal information online not only an asset consumers can manage, but also a virtual currency that can be traded someday.

  • The Web Means The End Of Forgetting

    Date published: 
    July 19, 2010

    Ryan Calo, a residential fellow at the Center for Internet & Society, is quoted in the New York Times on privacy issues in the age of online social media and his research on the effects of anthropomorphic icons on online sharing activities. Jeffrey Rosen files this story:

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