Press

CIS in the news.

  • Is the LAPD using drones to search for ex-cop Christopher Dorner?

    Date published: 
    February 12, 2013

    "Ryan Calo, director of privacy and robotics at the Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society agreed with Harman, saying: "Any time you have a tool like that in the hands of law enforcement that makes it easier to do surveillance, they will do more of it. This could be a time when people are uncomfortable, and they want to place limits on that technology.""

  • Why the Rick Ross Case May Change Hip Hop

    Date published: 
    February 12, 2013

    "According to Julie Ahrens, director of Copyright and Fair Use at Stanford University's Center for Internet and Society, that's because such bandied-about issues as fair use, parody, and obscenity don't figure neatly with the suit and the parties involved."

  • Why Americans Are Saying No to Domestic Drones

    Date published: 
    February 11, 2013

    "Ryan Calo of Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society suggested in a December 2011 paper that because of their “disquieting” nature, drones “could be just the visceral jolt society needs” to spark broader changes in how Americans conceptualize privacy problems."

  • Aaron’s Law Takes Shape

    Date published: 
    February 11, 2013

    "Jennifer Granick, a scholar and computer crime defense attorney at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society, addressed Kerr’s proposal in a January 23 post, calling it “a great second step.”"

  • Congress' horse-and-buggy computer laws

    Date published: 
    February 6, 2013

    ""Congress tries to write technology-neutral laws," says Jennifer Granick, an Internet law expert at Stanford, "but there's been a wholesale change in how we interact with computers" that renders these laws quickly anachronistic."

  • Privacy worries may stall commercial use of drone aircraft

    Date published: 
    February 3, 2013

    ""If we don't fix the privacy problems for civil liberties, we'll never realize the benefits from drones," said Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington who specializes in robotics and privacy. "Folks will be afraid and object.""

  • When the drones come home

    Date published: 
    February 2, 2013

    "“The rising hostility in Pakistan and now Yemen is causing a bit of a pullback in global and U.S. opinion. I sense people becoming more and more doubtful about the efficacy of drone policy as policy,” Asaro told the Star."

  • Hackers asked to help revise outdated digital laws

    Date published: 
    January 31, 2013

    "Citing the legendary Hacker Manifesto and tragic suicide of digital activist Aaron Swartz, Jennifer Granick, Director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, pointed out that just studying computers, network security, and programming flaws, simply in the name of curiosity and exploration, can be a crime or civil offense — values counter to the hacking community."

  • Liability Roadblocks For Self-Driving Cars

    Date published: 
    January 30, 2013

    "Smith was behind a November White Paper analyzing the current legality of driverless cars, the short version of which is: driverless cars are probably already legal, since they’re not actively prohibited."

  • Anonymous Plays Games With U.S. Sites

    Date published: 
    January 28, 2013

    "Kerr's proposals have been picked up and refined by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), in what calls "Aaron's Law." The group's suggestions have also been endorsed by Jennifer Granick, the director of civil liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, who described Kerr's initial efforts as "necessary but not sufficient.""

  • The suicide of Aaron Swartz: an appropriate platform for CFAA reform?

    Date published: 
    January 24, 2013

    "Stanford Law School’s Professor Jennifer Granick disagrees, and she chastises Professor Kerr for lumping Aaron’s alleged conduct of “circumventing code-based restrictions” in with the crime of ”using someone else’s password, which is the quintessential access without authorization” proscribed by the CFAA because, as Professor Granick explained, “[u]sing another person’s password gets you access to their files."

  • Hacktivist anger over US government's 'ludicrous' cyber crackdown

    Date published: 
    January 24, 2013

    "Jennifer Granick, an attorney and the director for civil liberties at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford law school, writing after Swartz's death, said that ordinary prosecutorial tactics, such as the "horse-trading" that is plea-bargaining, become "extraordinary mistakes when the case is bogus or overcharged"."

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