Press

CIS in the news.

  • Could a cyberwar ever be ethical?

    Date published: 
    June 19, 2012

    The Atlantic has published a fascinating article about how the ongoing digital revolution is changing the face of war, and how military and government leaders are failing to adopt a new ethics to match. Written by cyberwar and emerging technology experts Patrick Lin, Fritz Allhoff, and Neil Rowe, the essay makes the case that just-war theory still applies – even when the battlefield is digital.

    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 

  • Brett Frischmann on Infrastructure as a Commons

    Date published: 
    June 18, 2012

    It’s unlikely that we are ever going to get a book as rigorous and comprehensive in its treatment of infrastructure as a commons than Professor Brett Frischmann’s recently published Infrastructure: The Social Value of Shared Resources (Oxford University Press). This book is a landmark in the study of the social value of infrastructure, a theme that is generally overlooked or marginalized.

    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 

  • World's Most Wired Computer Scientist

    Date published: 
    June 18, 2012

    Arvind Narayanan’s business card is an exercise in brevity. It contains no data except his name and the words “Google me,” a fitting calling card for an academic who specializes in privacy and anonymity research. When you do Google him, his online footprint is robust, but highly selective and pruned.

  • You Know You Want One: Personal Robots Not Ready For You Yet

    Date published: 
    June 18, 2012

     

    "It's a real boon to the entire robotics industry to have this common language," says Ryan Calo, who follows the robotics industry at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society.
     
    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 
  • Self-driving cars are almost here — but don’t expect to own one tomorrow

    Date published: 
    June 14, 2012

     

    “Self-driving vehicles, since the 1930s, have been 20 years away,” says Bryant Walker Smith, a fellow at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society who focuses on the law and policy of autonomous vehicles.
     
    “The good news is, now they’re only 10 years away.”

    Read the full story at the original publication link below. 

  • Van Schewick’s View of Net Neutrality and Quality of Service

    Date published: 
    June 14, 2012

    Network Quality of Service (QoS) is the technical issues that lurks behind the policy issue of net neutrality. While there are many subtle variations of net neutrality, the concept as a whole comes from the idea that the Internet should have a “soft middle” that exerts little or no influence over the behavior of users and applications, and a very robust set of services at the edge that handle all the problems of congestion, charging, and innovation.

  • The Growing Power of the Meme

    Date published: 
    June 14, 2012

    For the originator of a meme, legal protections are slim, and that’s the way it should be, says copyright attorney Anthony Falzone, executive director of the Fair Use Project at Stanford Law School. “If you’re the first person to do the video S- -t Girls Say, that doesn’t mean someone else can’t use the same idea with girls saying different stuff,” he says. “Just because you’re the first one to do something doesn’t mean you should be the only one to get to do it.”

    Read the full publication at the original link below. 

  • If You've Ever Sold a Used iPod, You May Have Violated Copyright Law

    Date published: 
    June 8, 2012

    CIS Affiliate Scholar Marvin Ammori's latest article for The Atlantic. 

    The Supreme Court will soon hear a case that will affect whether you can sell your iPad -- or almost anything else -- without needing to get permission from a dozen "copyright holders." Here are some things you might have recently done that will be rendered illegal if the Supreme Court upholds the lower court decision:

  • Marvin Ammori on Cyber Warfare and Cyber Security

    Date published: 
    June 1, 2012

    Marvin Ammori is an Internet law expert who has contributed to promoting freedom and security online. He spent years as a lead advocate for network neutrality, representing citizens' groups before agencies and courts. He also spent three years as a law professor helping to shape the direction of nascent laws of cybersecurity through his teaching and writings. He currently runs his own firm in Washington, DC,where he counsels tech companies on legal and policy strategy.

  • It’s Getting Easier to Fly Drones in the U.S.

    Date published: 
    May 31, 2012

    “They’re right and they’re wrong,” said Ryan Calo, an incoming law professor at the University of Washington School of Law, who has taught at Stanford University on the questions surrounding privacy and robotics. “The law won’t treat a helicopter any different than the use of a drone, likely. But drone surveillance is so much more cost effective and efficient… The incentives for police officers to engage in surveillance is higher, and the obstacles are lower.”

    Read full story at the original publication link below. 

  • Domestic Drones and Privacy Law

    Date published: 
    May 31, 2012

    On February 14, 2012, President Obama signed the Federal Aviation Administration Modernization and Reform Act into law.  This Act requires the FAA to allow others to fly drones, including law enforcement agencies, private companies and even individual hobbyists, over American neighborhoods.

  • Jennifer Granick to Direct New Civil Liberties Initiative at Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society

    Date published: 
    May 30, 2012

    Stanford Law School today announced the appointment of Jennifer Stisa Granick as Director of Civil Liberties at the Center for Internet and Society (CIS). Granick will lead the Center’s work at the intersection of online technologies and civil liberties, with a particular focus on cybersecurity, national security, government surveillance and free speech.

    Read full story at the original publication link below. 

  • Some Legal Considerations for the Driverless Car

    Date published: 
    May 23, 2012

    CIS Resident Fellow Bryant Walker Smith talks with Patrick Egan sUAS News about some recent and upcoming events as well as examine the potential ramifications for our roads and society. 

    Listen to full podcast at link below. 

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